I Need a Suggestion for a Beer

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Chip

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First off, thanks in advance to those of you who choose to provide me some help and guidance. Here is my delima...

I am just getting started brewing my own beer and so far have found it be a great deal of fun. Over Memorial Day weekend here in the USA (last weekend in May) I will be camping with about 30 others and we often sit about the fire at night enjoying a beer or two. I would love to bring along a home brew but simply there are way to many options to chose from.

I have two batches brewing now that have made from recipies that include extracts - both dry and liquid - along with hops and grains. My equipment calls for five gallon batches and I plan on making two to feed everyone's thirst for the weekend. Most of these folks drink an assortment of beer ranging from light ale to American lager.

In searching for a choice I need to consider that the beer should be easily enjoyed by most folks, be brewed within my skill level, not have a killer alcohol content because there are children in the crowd, and something that can travel and be served from a cooler over a five day period.

Choosing a beer should be easy, but I continue to go back and forth between what I like - a good British Bitter or stout - and what everyone else might enjoy. So I am asking for your help on choosing a beer - a recipe - that you have found it easy to a large group palate.

Thanks again,

Chip
 

Parker36

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Just had this debate today about what kind of spring seasonal to make. The overwhealming verdict: Can't beat a wheat.
 

Fingers

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I'm surfing for a recipe like that right now. I'm looking in the recipe database (link at the top) for an American Pale Ale (APA). I'm leaning toward BierMuncher's Centennial Blonde. I've done a few of BierMuncher's recipes, and he hasn't steered me wrong yet.

Here's a quote from his description:

"Light and crisp. The IBU’s are on the low side, but there is a nice sweet/spicy balance to the beer. The great fresh taste of a craft ale with an extremely clean finish. This reminds me of what a local craft brewery might come out of the gates with to win over a new market. Very drinkable with wide appeal. I’ve yet to have anyone, even BMC drinkers not say it’s one of the best beers they’ve tasted….period. The secret lies in the name. I moved through Northern Brewer, Nugget and Pearle hops, all in combination with Cascade. Even went with a strict Cascade hop bill, but was just a bit on the tart side for this lighter grain bill."
 

DrunkTrucker

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You can try cheesefood's vcca. Its a pretty good beer to chill out and drink.
 

jmiracle

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I'd go with just a simple pale ale, less hoppy then a lot of APAs. Probably something that's just 6.6 pounds of LME plus the hops.

If you doing two you could do one pale ale and one brown ale or ordinary bitter.
 
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Chip

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I like the idea of a bitter - since that is one of my favorite. Perhaps a duel approach is in order for this challenge. A bitter and an ale.

Should one run out, folks will just drink the other - after all - its free.

Thanks for the suggestions and I have saved BierMuncher's Centennial Blonde recipe.
 

kush

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Parker36 said:
Just had this debate today about what kind of spring seasonal to make. The overwhealming verdict: Can't beat a wheat.
I second that. Im waiting for my hefe to be transfered to the cornie.
 

bs22619

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I would also do a lighter pale ale. My last batch was out of a Charlie Pappazian's book, the original Sierra Nevada pale ale recipe. It was lighter and crisp however had enough body to be enjoyed on a colder night. Plus its got a cool idea behind it. (who hasnt heard or Sierra Nevada?) My most prized batch according to my family, who are all lighter beer drinkers.
 

Sloppy Sam

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If you want something easy. Midwest sells an American Light Extract boil kit that is my favorite lawnmower beer. Light and a little hoppy. Crisp Clean and low on the alcohol so you can drink it all night long.
 
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Chip

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I looked up EdWort's Ale and believe that the all grain is above my current skill and equipment as it is an all grain - but it sure looks good.
 

Bernie Brewer

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Chip said:
I looked up EdWort's Ale and believe that the all grain is above my current skill and equipment as it is an all grain - but it sure looks good.

Go to Recipator and convert it to extract or whatever process you use.

Also EdWort's Kolsch is likely to please the masses.
 

explosivebeer

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Hey Chip,

Where in Puyallup are you? I grew up on Lake Tapps and then out in Lakewood.

Anyway, I thought I'd recommend the Chocolate Hazelnut Porter I did a few months ago. It's extremely smooth and almost anyone will enjoy it, even if they don't typically like darker beers. It's also a 5-gallon extract recipe so it's right up your alley.

That, plus a more traditional light ale or lager would probably do the trick. I'll see if I can dig up my recipe for you if you're interested.
 

Moonpile

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If you're planning on bottle conditioning this beer, then I'm going to second the suggestion for a Wheat. Since it's for a camping trip and you will likely be toting these brews around in a cooler any sediment is going to get disturbed, but for a wheat, that's ok.
 
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Chip

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explosivebeer said:
Hey Chip,

Where in Puyallup are you? I grew up on Lake Tapps and then out in Lakewood.

.
I live on what I call the West Hill. We look out over the valley just off of where 72nd dumps down in the valley.

My loves stout and porters so please send over your recipe. I am just starting and gathering all of these to try is just plain fun.
 

explosivebeer

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Chip said:
I live on what I call the West Hill. We look out over the valley just off of where 72nd dumps down in the valley.

My loves stout and porters so please send over your recipe. I am just starting and gathering all of these to try is just plain fun.
I figured I might as well give this recipe a proper write-up if I was going to be sharing it with people. Here you go: https://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=54159

I hope it turns out great for you. Be careful not to let people taste it before your weekend retreat or it might not make it that long. :mug:
 
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Chip

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explosivebeer said:
I figured I might as well give this recipe a proper write-up if I was going to be sharing it with people. Here you go: https://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=54159

Thanks for the recipe, I have it saved in my "to try" file under do this one fast. One question though, you say to add the aroma hops at flameout. I have seen that on other recipies - when or what is flameout?

Thanks again and this one is getting brewed as soon as out stout is gone. It is getting bottled this weekend.
 

Danek

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Chip said:
One question though, you say to add the aroma hops at flameout. I have seen that on other recipies - when or what is flameout?
Flameout is at zero minutes, at the very end of the boil. The aromatic components of hops are easily lost through boiling, so a lot of people add aroma hops only after they've turned the flame off after the end of the boil. The hops then impart flavour during the time it takes to cool down the wort.
 

explosivebeer

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Cool - I'm glad to hear you'll be putting it to use. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

And thanks Danek for the clarification.
 

Chriso

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I would +1 to either EdWort's Haus Pale Ale or Koelsch, and just convert them from AG to Extract. Both are fantastic for people who are accustomed to drinking BMC.

Sounds like a fun camping trip, hope it goes well! :)
 
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Chip

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The camping trip is very cool. We actually do a recreation of the Fur Trapper period of time 1840's and setup tipi's, shot flintlock rifles, and sit around the fire at night telling stories.

A great excuse to drink beer and enjoy the company of good friends.

Thanks for the advice on flame-out. I thought that what it meant - zero boiling time - and have seen it in several recipes.
 
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Chip

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I picked up the ingredients for Cheeseheads Carmel Vanilla Ale today. Tomorrow it goes in the primary.

Thanks to everyone for your advice and help. I have lots of new recipies for future batches.

This forum ROCKS!
 

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