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Lusch

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Hey folks just bottled my first Canadian red tonight and low and behold the capper that I borrowed from my brew shop capped all the bottles and a bunch of them are loose, I'm using corona majority as well as 15-20 screw-ons, never had a problem before using another type of capper but sure enough as soon as I change I get burned...My question is will the beers that are loose spoil overnight before I get to my buddys and get his capper to recap the beers?
Thanks
Andy
 

Sasquatch

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Your beers won't spoil in a day, but if you recap them, you'll find that you may have lost some carbonation. Certain brands of bottle don't have the "standard" size top. Besides that, Coroana being clear glass is about the worst thing you can store your beer in. Think skunk.
 

cowain

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I bet there is a high correlation between the caps that aren't on there very well and the screw top bottles. Screw top bottles require a special sealer. Stick to non-screw top type and it should work out well.
 
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Sasquatch said:
Your beers won't spoil in a day, but if you recap them, you'll find that you may have lost some carbonation. Certain brands of bottle don't have the "standard" size top. Besides that, Coroana being clear glass is about the worst thing you can store your beer in. Think skunk.

What is the go with the clear bottles, I use them all the time, but haven't had any problems yet.
 

tnlandsailor

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The deal with clear and even green glass leading to skunking is all about hops. When the hop oils are subjected to light, they break down and produce the flavor and aroma described as skunky. It's not pleasant. Evidently, brown glass is able to filter the damaging light waves and prevent/minimize the skunking process. If you keep your bottled beer in the fridge or in a dark place, it's probably no big deal.

I remember the first time I tried a Pilner Urquell. I bought it at the specialty market and took it home and after the first sip almost poured it out. It was nasty and I couldn't figure out what all the fuss was about regarding this beer being the king of lagers or whatever. Well, come to find out, imported beer in green glass can sit for days and days (maybe weeks?) under the flourscent lights in the cooler. Skunk city. Your best bet for imports like this is cans or beer shipped and stored in a closed cardboard box - or - find one in a brown bottle.

The only brewery I've heard of that gets around this light issue is Miller. Evidently they use some kind of hop stabalizer that prevents the degradation by light and allows them to use clear glass bottles without this concern.
 

Sasquatch

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I've had skunky Millers. The way to test it out is to buy a 12 pack of corona or miller, and a 6 pack from the same store, at the same time. Both companies box up 12s in a light-proof box, and sixes are exposed. You will find a noticeable difference in the quality.
 

Shmohel

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tnlandsailor said:
The deal with clear and even green glass leading to skunking is all about hops. When the hop oils are subjected to light, they break down and produce the flavor and aroma described as skunky. It's not pleasant. Evidently, brown glass is able to filter the damaging light waves and prevent/minimize the skunking process. If you keep your bottled beer in the fridge or in a dark place, it's probably no big deal.

I remember the first time I tried a Pilner Urquell. I bought it at the specialty market and took it home and after the first sip almost poured it out. It was nasty and I couldn't figure out what all the fuss was about regarding this beer being the king of lagers or whatever. Well, come to find out, imported beer in green glass can sit for days and days (maybe weeks?) under the flourscent lights in the cooler. Skunk city. Your best bet for imports like this is cans or beer shipped and stored in a closed cardboard box - or - find one in a brown bottle.

The only brewery I've heard of that gets around this light issue is Miller. Evidently they use some kind of hop stabalizer that prevents the degradation by light and allows them to use clear glass bottles without this concern.
Great explanation. I had heard this before -- about bottle colors -- but never knew why or if it were true. Thanks LandSailor
 
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