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jezter6

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So I did it, I couldn't wait.

After reading up and asking questions, I said screw it and went and bought a kit from New England Cheesemaking (the Cheese Queen).

Hopefully I will get it and be making cheese by this weekend!!!

I still don't know how to tell the difference between Pasteurized and Ultra P, so the first go round might not be good.
 

BrianP

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I think I'm close to breaking down and doing the same. The mozzarella thread may have done it for me.
 

SuperiorBrew

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jezter6 said:
So I did it, I couldn't wait.

After reading up and asking questions, I said screw it and went and bought a kit from New England Cheesemaking (the Cheese Queen).

Hopefully I will get it and be making cheese by this weekend!!!

I still don't know how to tell the difference between Pasteurized and Ultra P, so the first go round might not be good.
I bought some cream the other day and it all said Ultra Pasturized, so maybe the milk will too. I googled my head off but got no definitave answer, it may be that they do not have to label it ultra but many still do, you can also look at the freshness date if its more than a week or tow its most likely ultra
 
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FWIW: From wikipeida http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasteurization

Pasteurisation typically uses temperatures below boiling since at temperatures above the boiling point for milk, casein micelles will irreversibly aggregate (or "curdle"). There are two main types of pasteurisation used today: high temperature/short time (HTST) and Extended Shelf Life (ESL) treatment. Ultra-high temperature (UHT, Also known as Ultra-heat treated) is also used for milk treatment. In the HTST process, milk is forced between metal plates or through pipes heated on the outside by hot water, and is heated to 71.7 °C (161 °F) for 15-20 seconds. UHT processing holds the milk at a temperature of 138 °C (250 °F) for a fraction of a second. ESL milk has a microbial filtration step and lower temperatures than HTST.[1] Milk simply labeled "pasteurised" is usually treated with the HTST method, whereas milk labeled "ultra-pasteurized" or simply "UHT" must be treated with the UHT method.
Pasteurisation is typically associated with milk, first suggested by Franz von Soxhlet in 1886. HTST pasteurised milk typically has a refrigerated shelf life of two to three weeks, whereas ultra pasteurised milk can last much longer when refrigerated, sometimes two to three months. When UHT treatment is combined with sterile handling and container technology (such as aseptic packaging), it can even be stored unrefrigerated for 3-4 months.[
 
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jezter6

jezter6

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I'm in contact with a few local dairies hoping that I can get milk in the raw from the farm. Maybe just roll up on saturday morning, pick up a gallon or two for cheese and come back next time I'm making a batch.

There's a number of local farmers that make/sell cheese for farmer's markets with their own milk, so at least if I can get some of that I can get some quality tested and proven milk.

That or I buy a farm and my own milk producers...
 

zoebisch01

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Iirc, for cheese making I have heard that the ultra is better as the contact time is reduced. Albeit it's at a much higher temperature. Actually I think Caroll might talk about that in her book.

Remember with cheese it's all about the milk. Kind of like if you brewed your beer with chlorinated water. *blech*. Actually this is one of the things that stopped me from going further...although we are fortunate to have a local dairy that does not feed the cows hormones...etc. But I want raw milk and need to venture into Amish land to get some...either that or get some milk goats, but that's a commitment.
 

zoebisch01

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jezter6 said:
I'm in contact with a few local dairies hoping that I can get milk in the raw from the farm. Maybe just roll up on saturday morning, pick up a gallon or two for cheese and come back next time I'm making a batch.

There's a number of local farmers that make/sell cheese for farmer's markets with their own milk, so at least if I can get some of that I can get some quality tested and proven milk.

That or I buy a farm and my own milk producers...
Once you feel confident, I'd recommend doing as big a batch as you can manage. By the time you run out you'll realize "dang I should have made more"! Also, unless you have a really good way of controlling humidity, don't venture into the more complex ripened soft cheeses. Trust me on that :D. Actually I have been thinking of a modified food container for this, but I just haven't had the time to try it. I have these NSF rectangular containers I got at Sam's club for around $15 a pop. Clear Acrylic or something. Great containers. But I was thinking they might be ideal if you could make a mini rack system inside and then figure out how much water you'd need to keep in there to get the right humidity. A little 'Mickey Mouse' but it should work....
 
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jezter6

jezter6

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As far as I've seen Ultra doesn't make curds and isn't good for cheese, but all the real info I find on ultra seems to be for cream, and not for milk. I've never seen anything that says ULTRA on a milk jug, but then again, I never looked too hard before.

I'll try with store milk once and if it sucks, I'll go dairy. In central PA, you should have no problem finding a local dairy. What part of Central are you from (pending where you live, I've seen people from Altoona to Lancaster all say they're in Central PA).
 
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jezter6

jezter6

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zoebisch01 said:
Once you feel confident, I'd recommend doing as big a batch as you can manage. By the time you run out you'll realize "dang I should have made more"! Also, unless you have a really good way of controlling humidity, don't venture into the more complex ripened soft cheeses. Trust me on that :D.
Sounds like brewing...don't wait for the first batch to be done before you start making another. :)
 

zoebisch01

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jezter6 said:
As far as I've seen Ultra doesn't make curds and isn't good for cheese, but all the real info I find on ultra seems to be for cream, and not for milk. I've never seen anything that says ULTRA on a milk jug, but then again, I never looked too hard before.

I'll try with store milk once and if it sucks, I'll go dairy. In central PA, you should have no problem finding a local dairy. What part of Central are you from (pending where you live, I've seen people from Altoona to Lancaster all say they're in Central PA).

I might have it backwards then. I am fairly certain it's in her book. (I think :D).

I live close to State College (Centre county...as central as it gets :D), so there are places...usually though you have to drive around to find them as people just hang a sign out by the road (mostly the Amish).
 
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Haha
That Milk site bases it's philopsophy after CAMRA...

Back in the 1970s, a couple of blokes were sitting in an English pub, bemoaning the consolidation of the brewing industry in England and the decline of British beer and ale. A commodity that represented the soul of Britain carefully brewed lagers from countless small-scale manufacturers, each with a distinctive color and taste had been edged out by the insipid canned beers of a few large monopolistic breweries. What was needed, they decided, was a return to traditional brewing methods. They launched A Campaign for Real Ale, which soon became the force that turned back the mega-brewers and reinstated varied and delicious ales to English tables and pubs.
What's needed today is a return to humane, non-toxic, pasture-based dairying and small-scale traditional processing, in short . . .
A Campaign For Real Milk
http://www.realmilk.com/why.html
 
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jezter6

jezter6

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zoebisch01 said:
I might have it backwards then. I am fairly certain it's in her book. (I think :D).

I live close to State College (Centre county...as central as it gets :D), so there are places...usually though you have to drive around to find them as people just hang a sign out by the road (mostly the Amish).
Awesome. Born and raised in Centre county myself. Family from Milesburg and up in Black Moshannon. I'z a mountain boy.

I'm sure there's some stuff maybe down Zion and towards Loch Haven on both sides of the stream.

From that real milk site:
# State College: (Centre County), Stone Soup Market, 1011 East College Avenue, Suite C, (In front of Centre Furnace Mansion), State College, PA 16801. Phone: (814) 234-3135. Email: [email protected] . Website: www.stonesoupmarket.org. Stone Soup carries locally produced dairy – raw cow’s milk, raw goat’s milk, raw butter, raw cheeses and yogurt, [and on contract with supplier] raw kefir, raw sour cream, raw cultured butter, raw cottage cheese, and occasional lacto-fermented vegetables and kombucha. They also have local, humanely-raised meat – fresh chicken, fish, bacon, and eggs delivered weekly, and pastured, grass-fed, antibiotic & hormone-free beef, pork and chicken. Locally baked goods are available weekly and certified organic fruits and vegetables are available on a seasonal basis.
 

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The ultra is no good for cheese. Most of the odd milks and creams are now ultra due to the long shelf life. Ultra milk is most likely to be in a box, not a gallon jug.

From cheesemaking.com
[SIZE=+1]Ultra Pasteurization[SIZE=+1]

[/SIZE]This is a range of milk processing temps from 191-212 F for varying times
once the temp rises above 174F the calcium component of the milk will be damaged to the point that a curd will not develop properly. If your curd forms as a loose mass or something looking like ricotta, then your milk source has been probably Ultra Pasteurized.
This higher heat treatment causes denaturation of whey proteins which subsequently stick to the casein particles. The effects are:
* Longer flocculation times
* Weak or no curd formation
* Poor syneresis (moisture release)
* Coarse textured curd with reduced ability to stretch, mat and melt.





[SIZE=+1]Ultra High Temperature Sterilization (UHT)[/SIZE]
(280F) Short Time (2 sees) ....
UHT when used to describe a dairy ingredient means that such ingredient shall have been thermally processed at or above 280 deg.F for at least 2 seconds.
DO NOT TRY TO MAKE THE QUICK MOZZARELLA FROM THIS MILK
The key word here is 'Shelf Life' and this process increases it to 60 plus days compared with the 18 days of lower temp pasteurization. It would be very hard to place the word 'Fresh' on the package with any conscience.



[/SIZE]



 

zoebisch01

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jezter6 said:
Awesome. Born and raised in Centre county myself. Family from Milesburg and up in Black Moshannon. I'z a mountain boy..

I live on Rattlesnake Pike baby! :D

Stone Soup wants an arm and a leg for the raw milk :(
 

zoebisch01

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SuperiorBrew said:
From cheesemaking.com



Ahh ok, thanks for that. I couldn't remember without the book :(.

I guess I never worried about it too much, because I feel it is best to find a raw milk source anyway :D
 
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jezter6

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Man I hope my kit comes by Friday (which it should since I ordered it Monday morning)...

I called a local farm who has a market stand that sells raw milk from PA (they don't have any milk cows, but do make cheese from that milk). I will be going up there first thing Saturday morning to pick up 2 gallons of fresh milk to make some cheeses.

Does anyone think that my kegerator will be a decent storage space? I keep it kind of warm (above 40) and could reasonably keep it at 48-50 with beer in it, since that's a fine serving temp for me. Humidity seems good, as there's always a little condensation rolling around. I don't have a meter to check temp and humidity, so I kinda have to guess at the first batch.

Cant wait!
 

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I just made my first batch of mozarella using a gallon of dairygold whole milk and it worked great. Smallish curds but they held together well and didn't seem to have the problems that UP is supposed to have. It goes on pizza this weekend.
 

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Alan, I expect, yes, expect to be able to try some of this!
 
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jezter6

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Absolutely. I should probably have a few ready for Maryland Brewday Summer 08.

We just need to figure out how to get the Summer one planned for May. There are 2 brewfests I know of I june that will keep me occupied from attending much in the way of brew days.

Speaking of which - Harrisburg Brewfest is in June. We usually go up Friday night, party, have the brewfest saturday, then leave sunday around checkout time to head back to MD.

Get permission from SWMBO now, we'll be booking the hotels in March.
 
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jezter6

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Making cheese is as long as doing AG brewday. I'm in 3 hours so far and just about getting ready to start the first weighted press into the mold, and PLENTY of stuff still to clean up.

Not an easy process, we shall see how it turns out.
 
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