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Southern_Junior

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So I am planning my new garage brewery. I am building a dedicated brewing space and trying to think everything through as much as possible. I will certainly overlook some stuff, but that’s life.

my question is ventilation. I am having the builder put in a large exhaust fan. But no hood vent. Is there a need to truly install a hood vent? Or would garage door open and exhaust fan on be enough? Everything is electric.
 
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Southern_Junior

Southern_Junior

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I see you are in Texas? I'd put in A/C and a steam condenser and be comfortable.
while I would love to, that got cut. I typically brew early in the morning. A good fan is usually enough.

i am thinking through a condenser. But wondering if it’s needed. Or if a box fan to disperse the steam is enough.
 

Transamguy77

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How big is the space? Between the door being open and the window with a fan that might be enough. Is there a way to just add a vent from a duct in the garage? I have a single duct and it makes a big difference, if the door is open for any length of time it will get hot but my garage stays closed most of the time and it will be almost as cool as the house. It’s a 20x20 space. And you could add a mini split later, if it turns out that you really need it.
Can’t wait to see pics! Are you planning on a sink?
 

Jhedrick83

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As someone who just did this. I ordered a Steam Condenser and did a brew prior to hooking it up just to see what it was like and get the new equipment dialed in before adding another variable. It was still a bit muggy and I was worried about a big fan stirring up all kinds of dust/particulates/bacteria and getting them in to my boiling wort. The steam condenser is 100% worth it. I keep my runoff in a bucket and use it to help wash up when I'm done too.
 

PCABrewing

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So I am planning my new garage brewery. I am building a dedicated brewing space and trying to think everything through as much as possible. I will certainly overlook some stuff, but that’s life.

my question is ventilation. I am having the builder put in a large exhaust fan. But no hood vent. Is there a need to truly install a hood vent? Or would garage door open and exhaust fan on be enough? Everything is electric.
I brew in the garage, upper mid-west, so I get the advantage of real hot or real cold weather.
I keep the double door open about 18". That creates a gap at the top of ~12" and the bottom is 18".
I have a service door at the back corner that I open to have cross ventilation.
That usually results in a decent breeze through the garage (3-car) so much that I have to close the service door sometimes to reduce turbulence and the risk of dust landing in the kettle.
Even with that much airflow I still get condensation all over my tools and since they are expensive tools I don't like that.
Open doors will not necessarily cure that problem.

Now if you add a hood at the proper height & CFM to capture the steam, you still need to have some inlet for fresh air to replace the volume that the hood exhausts. Ideally you have a furnace filter on the inlet to minimize dust. Could be as simple as a window with something to hold the filter.

Also consider that if you have a hood it will produce a negative pressure that can result in exhaust (CO) from furnaces or water heaters being sucked into the structure rather than going up the intended flue. That is often a problem with "whole house" fans.
Even if the appliances are in the basement, if you open a door to the house from the evacuated garage you can create that reverse flow in the flues.

So Dust & CO are two things to consider in addition to the excess moisture.
 

PCABrewing

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As someone who just did this. I ordered a Steam Condenser and did a brew prior to hooking it up just to see what it was like and get the new equipment dialed in before adding another variable. It was still a bit muggy and I was worried about a big fan stirring up all kinds of dust/particulates/bacteria and getting them in to my boiling wort. The steam condenser is 100% worth it. I keep my runoff in a bucket and use it to help wash up when I'm done too.
So are you able to collect close to the amount that you boil off?
 
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Southern_Junior

Southern_Junior

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How big is the space? Between the door being open and the window with a fan that might be enough. Is there a way to just add a vent from a duct in the garage? I have a single duct and it makes a big difference, if the door is open for any length of time it will get hot but my garage stays closed most of the time and it will be almost as cool as the house. It’s a 20x20 space. And you could add a mini split later, if it turns out that you really need it.
Can’t wait to see pics! Are you planning on a sink?
Brewery area will be about 15 by 20, deepest part of the garage. Getting a stainless deep basin sink with pre wash and a 4inch floor drain.
 
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Southern_Junior

Southern_Junior

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I brew in the garage, upper mid-west, so I get the advantage of real hot or real cold weather.
I keep the double door open about 18". That creates a gap at the top of ~12" and the bottom is 18".
I have a service door at the back corner that I open to have cross ventilation.
That usually results in a decent breeze through the garage (3-car) so much that I have to close the service door sometimes to reduce turbulence and the risk of dust landing in the kettle.
Even with that much airflow I still get condensation all over my tools and since they are expensive tools I don't like that.
Open doors will not necessarily cure that problem.

Now if you add a hood at the proper height & CFM to capture the steam, you still need to have some inlet for fresh air to replace the volume that the hood exhausts. Ideally you have a furnace filter on the inlet to minimize dust. Could be as simple as a window with something to hold the filter.

Also consider that if you have a hood it will produce a negative pressure that can result in exhaust (CO) from furnaces or water heaters being sucked into the structure rather than going up the intended flue. That is often a problem with "whole house" fans.
Even if the appliances are in the basement, if you open a door to the house from the evacuated garage you can create that reverse flow in the flues.

So Dust & CO are two things to consider in addition to the excess moisture.

Not sure I follow on the risks of the CO. There is no other equipment in the garage. Just an exhaust fan(think beefy bathroom fan) and the garage door, service door, and door to house.
 

Transamguy77

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Brewery area will be about 15 by 20, deepest part of the garage. Getting a stainless deep basin sink with pre wash and a 4inch floor drain.
That sounds great! Can’t wait to see pics of it done. Do you get the whole garage for the brewery or do you have to share? I only have half as the still in progress brewery and the other half is for tools and house stuff.
 

PCABrewing

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Not sure I follow on the risks of the CO. There is no other equipment in the garage. Just an exhaust fan(think beefy bathroom fan) and the garage door, service door, and door to house.
Just pointing out a sometimes overlooked risk. For me the dust from the breeze is a bigger risk. Some houses have a furnace and/or water heater in a closet in the garage VS the basement.
 
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Southern_Junior

Southern_Junior

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That sounds great! Can’t wait to see pics of it done. Do you get the whole garage for the brewery or do you have to share? I only have half as the still in progress brewery and the other half is for tools and house stuff.
As long as my wife gets one spot to park her car, I get the rest of the garage. Tools, work bench, etc. I’m a pretty lucky guy.
 

OakIslandBrewery

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Having a dedicated brew space is a very nice luxury not everyone can have. I started out in the kitchen like so many have and still do. When we built a new home a basement brewery was added. For ventilation I have a round hood that lowers from the ceiling with a pulley. I can lower it to inches above the boil kettle if needed. It does a great job at removing fumes and condensation plus it makes a good head knocker if I don't pull it up all the way. The hood is a galvanized planter bucket with a 6" diameter flexible duct attached to an inline exhaust fan. It vents outside through a damper that closes when the fan is off. I wired in a variable speed switch to power it. Works great.
 

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