How warm should saison fermentation be? (belle Saison)

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Happydad1689

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I'd like to brew a saison this Monday but my basement is around 65. I can pitch around 80 and let it drop..... What do you think?

I did one saison last summer and liked the peppery notes but I'm not sure I'd get that at 65.
 
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I've used Belle Saison several times. I prefer to pitch lower 66°-68°F and then let it rise slowly on its own. I've gotten into the mid/80's w/ really good outcomes.
 
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Happydad1689

Happydad1689

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I've used Belle Saison several times. I prefer to pitch lower 66°-68°F and then let it rise slowly on its own. I've gotten into the mid/80's w/ really good outcomes.

Do you raise it with temp control or does it do it on its own?
 

jwalk4

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I have pitched it at 65 for my wheat saison and just left it alone in my basement until the airlock starts to slow. Then I brought it upstairs where it is a touch warmer (around 70) and let it sit for another week.



Turned out nice and dry at 1.006. And that's with Wheat!
 
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Happydad1689

Happydad1689

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I have pitched it at 65 for my wheat saison and just left it alone in my basement until the airlock starts to slow. Then I brought it upstairs where it is a touch warmer (around 70) and let it sit for another week.



Turned out nice and dry at 1.006. And that's with Wheat!

Looks good. Was it "spicy" though? The pepper taste comes from the yeast being hotter I heard.
 

Shawn_Brewin

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This yeast loves the higher temps in my opinion. start low 65ish and let it do its thing. you want all those flavours that yeast develop at higher temps. thats what makes it a saison.
 

TheBigLebrewsk1

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I have pitched it at 65 for my wheat saison and just left it alone in my basement until the airlock starts to slow. Then I brought it upstairs where it is a touch warmer (around 70) and let it sit for another week.



Turned out nice and dry at 1.006. And that's with Wheat!
I like this approach as well. I do not enjoy overly funky Saisons.
 

jwalk4

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Looks good. Was it "spicy" though? The pepper taste comes from the yeast being hotter I heard.
It was spicy in the sense that I could pull out distinct clove flavor, not so much pepper. Thin mouthfeel, highly carbed and slight alcoholic in the finish.

To me, it seemed right for what I was after. Any more and the beer would have been out of balance. But either way, you're bound to do alright by this yeast; it's one of the few Danstar products that I would endorse.

I plan to do a belgian pale ale with it this summer!
 

howamidriving

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I did a saison in the middle of summer last year with this yeast and it turned out really well. We don't have AC and the house was low 80s during the day and mid to high 70s at night. I stuck it in my closet and wrapped it in a sleeping bag. I definitely got those pepper notes at those temps and I believe it finished at 1.006.
 

Kate00

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I use French saison yeast. I start fermenting at 68 degrees for a couple of days, then I raise the temp a couple degrees per day until it's in the mid to high 70's. This gives me full attenuation without any harsh flavor.
 
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