How to read the NCYC yeast properties?

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beervoid

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Hello everyone,

I've got a yeast here and got the properties from the NCYC website.
It states:

Brewing Information
  • Description Unknown
  • Deposit 8-15mm
  • Head Good Head
  • Attenuation 1.008-1.010
  • Clarity 0-10
  • Fermentation Rate 8-10°
  • Flocculence Flocculent

Can someone translate this for me? I'm especially interested to know what the attenuation % is from this yeast.
Flocculent means medium low or high?

Thank you!
 

Vale71

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Just go to their homepage https://www.ncyc.co.uk/ and expand the "BREWING STRAINS" item in the left sidebar.
Next to every entry there's an information button, just position the cursor over the button and a balloon help will open explaining what each parameter means. Unfortunately there is no information for the flocculence paramenter but since possible values are "Flocculent" and "Non-Flocculent" I'd guess the former means medium to high and the latter medium to low.
 
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beervoid

beervoid

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Just go to their homepage https://www.ncyc.co.uk/ and expand the "BREWING STRAINS" item in the left sidebar.
Next to every entry there's an information button, just position the cursor over the button and a balloon help will open explaining what each parameter means. Unfortunately there is no information for the flocculence paramenter but since possible values are "Flocculent" and "Non-Flocculent" I'd guess the former means medium to high and the latter medium to low.
Hi thanks I just checked but it didn't really specify the attenuation % but I can kind of guess now I think.
 

Vale71

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Values usually come from test fermentations of a 12°Plato wort (1.048 SG) so you can probably use that as a starting value to calculate attenuation.
 
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