How to get carbonic acid taste out of my stout?

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olie

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So, I made a stout that I really enjoy, sort of. I was great after fermentation, and I was really excited but, on carbonation (admittedly, a tad too much), it took on a strong carbonic-acid (like seltzer water) taste.

The foam is still really good -- lots of dark, slightly chocolaty stout taste there -- but the beer itself, even after resting/conditioning for 6 months, still tastes of carbonation.

Anything I can do to help neutralize that?

Note: This recipe was bottle carbonated, and a tad more than a stout usually has. (I say this because it's a bit too foamy on the pour.) We've been cracking open a bottle a month hoping for the stout-y taste to come forward, but it's particularly slow.

I guess I'm wondering if I have to give-up on this otherwise quite delicious recipe, or if there's something I might do to salvage it on the next batch. On possibility is to force carbonate, so as to have slightly better control over the numbers. But perhaps there are other options?

What say HomeBrewTalk...?


Thanks!
 
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Basically I’d try letting it sit in the glass for awhile before drinking. Maybe pour a few bottles into a pitcher, and let it sit until the carbonation level decreases a little?
 
We were thinking about that, but isn't it already carbonic acid at that point? Or maybe letting the fizz out will change the taste...? Easy enough to just let a bottle go flat for tasting; we'll try that & report back. :)
 
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In what way?

Either way, the answer is no -- it's pretty much just normal old water like we always use.

Is one supposed to make water adjustments for stouts?
 
Just sounds like you're describing a water problem.

Any style can benefit from hitting the right mash pH, sulfate, chloride, sodium, and magnesium levels.
 
I tend to carbonate stouts pretty low, around 2.0 volumes of CO2.

And yes, the process that creates carbonic acid works both ways. If the solution isn’t kept under pressure, carbonic acid reduces back to CO2 and H2O.
 
So, I made a stout that I really enjoy, sort of. I was great after fermentation, and I was really excited but, on carbonation (admittedly, a tad too much), to took on a strong carbonic-acid (like seltzer water) taste.

The foam is still really good -- lots of dark, slightly chocolaty stout taste there -- but the beer itself, even after resting/conditioning for 6 months, still tastes of carbonation.

Anything I can do to help neutralize that?

Note: This recipe was bottle carbonated, and a tad more than a stout usually has. (I say this because it's a bit too foamy on the pour.) We've been cracking open a bottle a month hoping for the stout-y taste to come forward, but it's particularly slow.

I guess I'm wondering if I have to give-up on this otherwise quite delicious recipe, or if there's something I might do to salvage it on the next batch. On possibility is to force carbonate, so as to have slightly better control over the numbers. But perhaps there are other options?

What say HomeBrewTalk...?


Thanks!

Conditioning at what temperature? I prefer to leave my stouts at room temp for a year or more as they keep getting better. What temperature do you serve your stout? I've found better flavor from serving a bit warmer than my lighter color beers too.
 
Conditioned @ room temp. It's about 6 months old. Been serving cold, though -- same fridge as everything else.
 

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