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DrMary

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So I am very new to mead making. I've done it successfully a few times but by no means know more than the absolute basics. I just started two one gallon carboys of mead--one simply a traditional one, one a cherry mead. I realized today after fermentation has been bubbling along for about three days that I hadn't mixed them well enough and an inch or so of honey has settled to the bottom. So I took the airlock off and tried to stir them today....which resulted in a volcano. Fortunately, I didn't lose more than about a half a cup, but there is still an inch of honey on the bottom. What do I do, other than make sure I mix thoroughly next time? I was thinking that maybe I could wait until primary fermentation ended and then pour all of it out into a bowl, mix like mad, pour it back into a carboy, let the sediment sink to the bottom for a week or so, and then re-rack it....obviously with the honey re-mixed, that could kickstart another fermentation, so I'd keep an airlock on it....
 

videojunkie1208

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Mixing it like you suggest after primary fermentation is an absolute way to destroy your mead. Oxygen is the enemy of ethanol. Once your fermentation is complete your goal is to minimize any contact between your mead and the air.


If you're really concerned, you can give the jug a good swirl while holding on to the airlock.
 

Dan O

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So I am very new to mead making. I've done it successfully a few times but by no means know more than the absolute basics. I just started two one gallon carboys of mead--one simply a traditional one, one a cherry mead. I realized today after fermentation has been bubbling along for about three days that I hadn't mixed them well enough and an inch or so of honey has settled to the bottom. So I took the airlock off and tried to stir them today....which resulted in a volcano. Fortunately, I didn't lose more than about a half a cup, but there is still an inch of honey on the bottom. What do I do, other than make sure I mix thoroughly next time? I was thinking that maybe I could wait until primary fermentation ended and then pour all of it out into a bowl, mix like mad, pour it back into a carboy, let the sediment sink to the bottom for a week or so, and then re-rack it....obviously with the honey re-mixed, that could kickstart another fermentation, so I'd keep an airlock on it....
The only thing bad about the honey sitting on the bottom is your hydrometer reading won't be accurate. The yeast will get to the honey.
I watched a time lapse video on Man Made Mead on YouTube where he did an experiment whether or not the sugars would get eaten by not mixing the honey & water, they did. It was kinda cool to see the honey level disappear little by little.
Pouring it in a bowl & mixing like mad would be a bad idea....unless you are looking to make honey vinegar.😋 In the beginning, (first 7days) , the yeast are trying to build a strong colony, making it a good thing to introduce oxygen. After that, oxygen is a no no! Oxygen is bad for the must after 7 days or so.
Give the carboy a gentle swirl to degas, not aerate. When you degas, you free the yeast from being stuck to the cO2 & the yeast get back to work. After that leave it alone & wait for that liquid gold.
Happy meading 😎
 
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DrMary

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Thank you all so much! I will sit patiently and let the yeast do its work!
 

bernardsmith

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Mixing it like you suggest after primary fermentation is an absolute way to destroy your mead. Oxygen is the enemy of ethanol. Once your fermentation is complete your goal is to minimize any contact between your mead and the air.


If you're really concerned, you can give the jug a good swirl while holding on to the airlock.
AFTER primary fermentation has ended, yes, but if there is a layer of honey then fermentation has not ended and in fact yeast will gobble up any O2 far faster than the O2 will bind to any compounds in the mead. AND if there was a volcano then what you have is the nucleation of CO2... and THAT would prevent any O2 accessing the vessel. My money is on there being absolutely no spoilage at this time. None.
 
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