How to add coffee to beer?

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Jtd6628

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I was planing on adding 16 oz of whole coffee beans into secondary for 14 days. I don't know if this is the right way to go to get both a lot of coffee and long lasting coffee? Should it go in the boil of ground in the primary I do not know? I also would like a suggestion on how to add some lactose for milk flavor and how much?

Another java stout

Style: Foreign Extra Stout OG: 1.070
Type: Extract FG: 1.019
Rating: 0.0 ABV: 6.68 %
Calories: 230 IBU's: 34.76
Efficiency: 70 % Boil Size: 2.83 Gal
Color: 51.1 SRM Batch Size: 5.00 Gal
Boil Time: 70 minutes

Fermentation Steps
Name Days / Temp
Primary 14 days @ 66.0°F
Secondary 14 days @ 72.0°F
Bottle/Keg 14 days @ 74.0°F

Grains & Adjuncts
Amount Percentage Name Time Gravity
1.87 lbs 18.00 % Caramel/Crystal Malt - 80L 70 mins 1.034
1.25 lbs 12.00 % Barrett Burston Wheat Malt 70 mins 1.037
1.04 lbs 10.00 % Chocolate Malt 70 mins 1.028
0.41 lbs 4.00 % Briess Roasted Barley 70 mins 1.033
0.41 lbs 4.00 % Black (Patent) Malt 70 mins 1.025
5.39 lbs 52.00 % Extra Light Dry Extract 70 mins 1.044

Hops
Amount IBU's Name Time AA %
2.08 ozs 32.34 Northern Brewer 70 mins 8.50
1.25 ozs 2.42 Cascade 5 mins 5.50

Yeasts
Amount Name Laboratory / ID
0.8 pkg Irish Ale Wyeast Labs (null)

Additions
Amount Name Time Stage
0.08 lb Malto-Dextrine 15 mins Boil
13.28 oz Coffee 14 days Secondary

Mash Profile
(none)

Carbonation
Amount Type Beer Temp CO2 Vols
5.35 oz Corn Sugar - Bottle Carbonation 74.0°F 2.50

Notes
Steep the grains for 30 mins in water bring to boil.
 

IXVolt

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I added 4oz of Sumatra (freshly ground right before brewing) coffee for the last 5 minutes of the boil in my last batch. I just put it in a coffee filter, and stapled it shut.

I was planning on cold brewing another 4 oz for the secondary, but the coffee flavor was so strong (perfect) I didn't need to add any more.

This was in a founders breakfast stout.
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f68/founders-breakfast-stout-clone-139078/
 

completenewbie

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Have only done one coffee beer - moved a stout to secondary for 2 days and racked on top of 2.5 cups of brewed and then cooled coffee (used a french press, however you get superior coffee from cold brewing if you have time to do it). Opened this batch a couple of days ago, so no idea how long the coffee flavor will last, but it's definitely there and noticeable, however would not call it "strong".

lactose for "milk flavor"? I was under the impression that lactose was purely to sweeten a stout, no real "milk flavor" added.
 
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Jtd6628

Jtd6628

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completenewbie said:
lactose for "milk flavor"? I was under the impression that lactose was purely to sweeten a stout, no real "milk flavor" added.
Well I have no clue about lactose I have just seen it used primarily in stouts and specifically recipes called milk stout
 

BryceL

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I had good success cold brewing coffee and adding it to secondary. I ground the coffee, put it in my french press, filled with 16oz of boiled and then cooled water, and let it sit overnight. I then poured it into my secondary carboy and racked my stout on top. Turned out great. I've read that adding the grounds to the boil can lead to a more bitter coffee taste, but I know people have had success with that as well.
 

dnslater

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I had good success cold brewing coffee and adding it to secondary. I ground the coffee, put it in my french press, filled with 16oz of boiled and then cooled water, and let it sit overnight. I then poured it into my secondary carboy and racked my stout on top. Turned out great. I've read that adding the grounds to the boil can lead to a more bitter coffee taste, but I know people have had success with that as well.

I did a similar technique. I cold brewed about 10 ounces of Blue Mountain Coffee in a french press overnight and then pressed in the morning and added to secondary. Adding at bottling would have the same effect, and I will likely do this for future stouts. I think cold brewing and not adding beans directly to your beer keeps oils and tannins out of the beer. Hot brewed coffee pulls oils out which would reduce head retention. I call it Blue Mountain Irish Stout.

BASEDOCUMENTSTOUTcopy-1.jpg


For the record, 10 ounces of strong coffee added to 5 gallons of dry Irish stout gives a subtle coffee hint, but definitely detectable. 12-16 ounces might be a good amount.
 

HighCountryBrewer

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Check out Terpsichoreankid on YouTube. He does a 4 or 5 part series on brewing a Java Stout. I think it works pretty well. As a matter of fact, of all the brewing videos I watched on YouTube, I learned the most from him and follow his methodology in my own brewing. CraigTube is also very good but wish he would do more partial mashes.
 

badlee

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I have found that adding the coffee at botteling time is great.Gives a prominent and long lasting coffee flavour.
 

Spintab

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I always crack about a pound of whole beans just enough to split the bean. Then steep them after flame out once wort temp reaches 110ish until I pitch to avoid astringency. I'm not going for an intense coffee flavor though, I'd drink coffee for that, just a nice compliment to the robust in a robust porter. I really like WLP004 (Irish Ale) for coffee beers too.

A note too: there's always something to be said about finding a local roaster to get beans from.
 

pstrohs

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I had good success cold brewing coffee and adding it to secondary. I ground the coffee, put it in my french press, filled with 16oz of boiled and then cooled water, and let it sit overnight. I then poured it into my secondary carboy and racked my stout on top. Turned out great. I've read that adding the grounds to the boil can lead to a more bitter coffee taste, but I know people have had success with that as well.

+1. I highly recommend cold brewing the coffee. It gives you the rich coffee taste w/o the bitterness. I brewed McAustin's Mocha Stout (w/ cold brewed coffee) about a year ago and it was incredible. The coffee flavor was perfect.
 

SDCore

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So, Port Brewing in San Diego add french cold pressed coffee at bottling/kegging and it is amazing. It gives the Stout a distinct coffee aroma and flavor. One of the best coffee stout I ever had. I was thinking of matching this technique in the future just because it tasted like someone poured a strong, aromatic, delicious coffee into my beer. Great pick me up as well since it still had caffeine in it.
 

drathbone

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I used an aeropress with about 6oz of Leopard Forest Zimbabwean Coffee to make about 1/2 gallon of coffee. Added to bottling bucket and racked on top. Gave the perfect amount of of flavor and aroma. Despite my coffee brewing process being hot, nobody noticed any bitterness.
 

slogger

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I had good success cold brewing coffee and adding it to secondary. I ground the coffee, put it in my french press, filled with 16oz of boiled and then cooled water, and let it sit overnight. I then poured it into my secondary carboy and racked my stout on top. Turned out great. I've read that adding the grounds to the boil can lead to a more bitter coffee taste, but I know people have had success with that as well.
Thanks for the info!:rockin: I plan on using this technique with a stout I plan to brew this weekend.
 

Codemunki

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I just coarse grind it and add directly to secondary for 1 week. It's a bit of a mess to clean up, but tastes great.
 

smccarter

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It seems to me that it might be better to add freshly ground coffee beans to the mash. Let the ground coffee beans steep along with the grain.

As a matter of fact, I've never thought about this until today when I searched for posts on the subject.

I'm always surprised to see how complex some of the processes are when I read posts on here. Nothing like making work of a hobbie I suppose, but I think I'll keep it simple and enjoy the hobbie that brings me so much joy and relaxation.
 

mrgstiffler

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It seems to me that it might be better to add freshly ground coffee beans to the mash. Let the ground coffee beans steep along with the grain.

As a matter of fact, I've never thought about this until today when I searched for posts on the subject.

I'm always surprised to see how complex some of the processes are when I read posts on here. Nothing like making work of a hobbie I suppose, but I think I'll keep it simple and enjoy the hobbie that brings me so much joy and relaxation.

Don't do that. You're going to extract more from the beans that you want and the yeast is going to remove more than you want. Add cold brewed coffee at packaging time.
 

HollisBT

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I know this thread is OLD, and I can make a new thread if I need to, but I thought I would start by asking this question here...

Would there be any detriment to the coffee if I made a cold brew, and then canned it in my pressure cooker to kill any bugs in it before I added it to my beer? Or would this just be wildly unnecessary...
 

mrgstiffler

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I know this thread is OLD, and I can make a new thread if I need to, but I thought I would start by asking this question here...

Would there be any detriment to the coffee if I made a cold brew, and then canned it in my pressure cooker to kill any bugs in it before I added it to my beer? Or would this just be wildly unnecessary...

I would say that's unnecessary. Just cold brew and add at packaging.
 
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