How much yeast & DME do I use for 5 gallons?

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JoefromPhilly

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I was reading in How to Brew, to use 2 packets of yeast, yet in other places i see just one. If I am using dry yeast packets from my LHBS, how many packets do I need for a 5 gallon batch?

Also, if I am using one standard 3.3 lb can of LME, how many pounds of DME should I be adding to create a full-bodied beer?

Thanks.

- Joe
 

brian_g

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I was reading in How to Brew, to use 2 packets of yeast, yet in other places i see just one. If I am using dry yeast packets from my LHBS, how many packets do I need for a 5 gallon batch?

Also, if I am using one standard 3.3 lb can of LME, how many pounds of DME should I be adding to create a full-bodied beer?

Thanks.

- Joe

Yeast: This gets into debates about pitching rates. I typically use one pack of dry yeast and I don't use a starter. If you want to try two packs go ahead. Neither way will ruin your beer.


DME: are you asking about adding 3.3 of LME plus DME? It's about 3 lbs of DME. One 5 gal batch of beer needs 6.6 lbs of LME or 6 lbs of DME. If you want to use half of each that's fine too.

Btw, you do know you need to add hops, right?
 
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JoefromPhilly

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So, basically, if I add one can of LME, I should add three pounds of dry malt extract. Correct?

Yes, I know about the hops, including AAUs and schedules.

Thanks for asking.
 

ChshreCat

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If you're just starting out, I'd find an established recipe and add how ever much LME and/or DME it calls for. Or course, that's not what I actually did... but it's what I'd recommend. :D
 

brian_g

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So, basically, if I add one can of LME, I should add three pounds of dry malt extract. Correct?

Yes

Yes, I know about the hops, including AAUs and schedules.

Thanks for asking.

Sorry, I wasn't trying to be insulting. True story, I was as the homebrew store and I was waiting at the counter. I struck up a conversation with the customer next to me and said, "so what are you making?" He said, "I don't know, whatever this can here makes. It's my first batch" He had a can of unhoped malt and 4 lbs of sugar. I had to explain to him that he the can was unhoped. I think I embarrassed the guy, but can you imagine if I hadn't said anything? He would have been pretty disappointed about his first batch.
 

McGarnigle

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Palmer recommends two dry yeast packets in case one of them is bad. He doesn't intend that you pitch both.
 

Crash

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Initially the yeast are going to multiply until they use up the available oxygen in the wort and then they'll start anaerobic phase and make alcohol. You want the yeast to take over the wort as soon as possible to prevent infection etc. If you use more than one packet or make a yeast starter ahead of time you're increasing your pitching rate and getting a head start on fermentation as well as potentially putting less stress on the yeast that can cause off flavors. Dry yeast it cheap; why gamble pitch 2.
 
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JoefromPhilly

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Brian,

No, you were not insulting. I know that there are people who don't understand hops, or unhopped extract. Any advice you provide to newbies is always good.

Crash,
I liked your explanation about why it is good to make a yeast starter.

Thanks to all.
 

85 Haro Designs

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I've been making yeast starters from dry yeast with awesome success.

I don't mean to beat a dead horse but I amazed myself by making a starter last April from dry yeast and then re-viving it this spring and using it in my "Wooly Booger" Common Ale recipe.

So far it tastes great (2ndary right now).
 
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