Quantcast

How much wheat to cause chill haze?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

frankvw

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2011
Messages
242
Reaction score
88
Location
Johannesburg
I've been brewing all-grain beers for about 8 years now. My three latest brews were all Belgian beers which contained a small amount (about 4%) of wheat. They all developed chill haze the moment I stuck them in the fridge. (Yes, I know, these beers shouldn't be served at fridge temperatures, but that's no the point here.)

Seeing as I haven't had this problem before and these three beers all contain a small amount of wheat, my first guess would be that the wheat is the culprit here. I didn't do a protein rest, since I assumed that properly modified modern wheat malts don't really need it for such a small percentage of the grain bill. It wouldn't be the first time I'm wrong. :)

I'd suspect my brewing process (vigor of the boil, hot/cold break, efficiency of my counterflow chiller, etc) if not for the fact that this is has not happened before. I've brewed Weizen in the past which were expectedly cloudy, but given the 50% of wheat in the grain bill, that was to be expected and desired.

Hence my question: can even a small amount of wheat (<4.5%) cause chill haze? Should I incorporate a protein rest to prevent this? Would all malts benefit from a protein rest or is it just the wheat malt that would need this?

-- Edit:
I suddenly realized I've used Weyermann Pilsener malt as a base malt for these beers, while I usually base my regular beers on local pale malt (which is of a lower quality and a hint darker but still works well in general). Would the Weyermann Pilsener malt increase the risk of chill haze?


// FvW
 
Last edited:

hottpeper13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2013
Messages
986
Reaction score
270
Location
Mequon
If the malt in question is floor malted then yes. Look at the COA to find out. I always give floor malted grain a protein rest and decoction mash,and whirlflok in the kettle.
 

dwhite60

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2009
Messages
941
Reaction score
514
Location
Wake County NC
Doesn't take much.

It will settle out given enough time in the cold. Last I did took about three weeks in the fridge. To me it's just an appearance thing. I've never noticed a flavor benefit from letting it clear.

It's protein. You're stripping out some of the nutritious part of the beer taking it out.

All the Best,
D. White
 
OP
frankvw

frankvw

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2011
Messages
242
Reaction score
88
Location
Johannesburg
If the malt in question is floor malted then yes. Look at the COA to find out. I always give floor malted grain a protein rest and decoction mash,and whirlflok in the kettle.
Nope, it's not floor malted, Bohemian or otherwise out of the ordinary. And I know Weyermann malts to be generally properly modified.
 
OP
frankvw

frankvw

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2011
Messages
242
Reaction score
88
Location
Johannesburg
Doesn't take much.
Then that's probably it. I also understand that Calcium in the brewing water can make a difference, so I should also look at my water mineral additions.

It will settle out given enough time in the cold. Last I did took about three weeks in the fridge. To me it's just an appearance thing. I've never noticed a flavor benefit from letting it clear
True. However, prevention is better than fixing it afterward and that start in the brew house.

It's protein. You're stripping out some of the nutritious part of the beer taking it out.
Also true. However, if that principle would prevail we'd simply leave the spent grains in the finished beer. Very nutritious. :) Instead I prefer a reasonably clear beer. It doesn't have to be brilliant (being unfiltered and all) but at least not completely opaque.
 

thehaze

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2017
Messages
2,131
Reaction score
921
Location
Iasi, Romania
Wheat malt can create haze, but the beer will clear with even 50% wheat malt. A lot of top hefes become clear if stored cold long enough, unless you shake and pour the yeast from the bottom.
 
Top