How much propane do you use for an All Grain batch?

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

BrewVegas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Messages
125
Reaction score
0
Location
Las Vegas
I took my finally finished single tier for a spin last weekend. I started off with a full propane tank with indicator dial. After brewing an all grain 5 gallon batch, the indicator was on "low".

How much propane do you use on a single tier all grain 5 gallon batch?

 

aubrey

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2008
Messages
242
Reaction score
2
Location
Acworth, Ga
Sorry, I dont have an answer for your question, but I wanted to comment that I really like how you put the wheels on the side of your brewstand so it can be stored vertical. It never occured to me to do that, I'll have to do that when I build mine, I've been trying to figure out where I'm going to put it...
 

The Pol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2007
Messages
11,390
Reaction score
117
I used to use 5lbs with a single burner... I imagine you COULD use up to 10lbs on a single brew.

I use none now...
 

rcrabb22

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jun 23, 2008
Messages
716
Reaction score
25
Location
Illinois
Here's my long answer..... :)

I use 20lb (typical gas grill size) tanks have been getting a consistent 5 1/2 60 min boil sessions per tank. I have a 15 gal kettle that has a larger 18" dia. so I need to boil 7.75 gal to end up with 5.5 gal. I do all-grain brewing so my wort temp going into the kettle is ~165F. I start the boil process with the kettle covered until a boil is achieved. Most times my kettle is boiling in ~15 minutes then I turn down the gas supply to keep a rolling boil (more than a simmer but short of vigorous boil).

This has been winter brewing (coldest session ~10F, warmest ~25F) in a garage with overhead and rear passage doors wide open. I try to position the burner to limit wind exposure while keeping it ~5ft from any combustables in the garage. Once the weather warms up I hope the gas will last for another 1.5 sessions.

BTW - I have 2 propane tanks so I don't have to run to the store to get more when one expires. I have a CO detector with PPM display I test regualrly with my car exhaust to ensure it is working.
 
OP
BrewVegas

BrewVegas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Messages
125
Reaction score
0
Location
Las Vegas
Sorry, I dont have an answer for your question, but I wanted to comment that I really like how you put the wheels on the side of your brewstand so it can be stored vertical. It never occured to me to do that, I'll have to do that when I build mine, I've been trying to figure out where I'm going to put it...
Thanks, having the wheels on the side is great to move it from the garage, through the kitchen and into the back patio. It's also great for storing the single tier while not in use. Originally, I had drilled holes in the tubing and tacked some nuts around the holes for the threaded casters. The tacking didn't hold, so I had to run a fill bead all the way around the nut.
 
OP
BrewVegas

BrewVegas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Messages
125
Reaction score
0
Location
Las Vegas
I need to get a lid for all three keggles. This will help with saving gas.

The burners are currently about 6" away from the bottom of the keg. Should they be closer?

Also, on the back of the burner there is a plate that regulates the amount of air pulled in by the burner. I don't notice a difference in the flame with this plate wide open or closed. Which setting would be best to save on gas?

Thanks!
 

Mutilated1

Beer Drenched Executioner
Joined
Jul 15, 2007
Messages
2,146
Reaction score
27
Location
Hoover, Alabama USA
Here's my long answer..... :)

I use 20lb (typical gas grill size) tanks have been getting a consistent 5 1/2 60 min boil sessions per tank. I have a 15 gal kettle that has a larger 18" dia. so I need to boil 7.75 gal to end up with 5.5 gal. I do all-grain brewing so my wort temp going into the kettle is ~165F. I start the boil process with the kettle covered until a boil is achieved. Most times my kettle is boiling in ~15 minutes then I turn down the gas supply to keep a rolling boil (more than a simmer but short of vigorous boil).

This has been winter brewing (coldest session ~10F, warmest ~25F) in a garage with overhead and rear passage doors wide open. I try to position the burner to limit wind exposure while keeping it ~5ft from any combustables in the garage. Once the weather warms up I hope the gas will last for another 1.5 sessions.

BTW - I have 2 propane tanks so I don't have to run to the store to get more when one expires. I have a CO detector with PPM display I test regualrly with my car exhaust to ensure it is working.
Do you heat your mash water and sparge water with the propane too ? I usually heat my water on the gas stove in the kitchen and just boil the wort on the porch outside so the wife and kids don't complain about the smell so much - why they don't love the smell I don't understand. Anyway, I haven't kept great records but I'm fairly certain I get a few more batches than 5 out of one of those propane tanks.
 

The Pol

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2007
Messages
11,390
Reaction score
117
There are about 22,000 BTUs in a pound of propane. How many BTUs are your burners?
 
Top