How much Pectic Enzyme for 6 gallons Blackberry Jam wine?

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dash14251

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6 gallon batch of blackberry preserves wine:

ok all the recipes for this seem to call for 1 tsp for a 1 gallon batch, so to me that means 6 tsp for a 6 gallon batch.

the little bottle that the pectic enzyme come in says 1/4 tsp per 5 gallons.

so now im not sure if the bottle is assuming that im making real grape wine and not a weird jam wine. but this may be a more concentrated brand of pectic enzyme. its Crosby and Baker Pectic Enzyme Solution. its a small bottle, only 1/2 oz.

if i go by the recipes online im guessing i use 6 tsp, but if i go by the bottle it could be about 1/4 tsp for the whole batch.

any help is appreciated! thanks
 

Dos_Locos_Brewery

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The role of pectin in jam and wine is completely opposite. In wines, you use pectic enzyme to degrade the natural pectins in the fruit, usually a relatively small amount. In jam, OTOH, you actively add pectin to gel the product. My guess is that whole bottles of pectic enzyme will not be enough to break down all the pectin in the jam needed for 6 gallons of wine. Unless I completely misunderstand what you're trying to do.
 

summersolstice

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I've made wine from jelly and posted a recipe in the recipes section. I used 1t of powdered pectic enzyme in a gallon and it cleared very nicely. I'm looking at a recipe on Jack Keller's website and his recipe calls for 5t of pectic enzyme in a one gallon recipe. To quote Jack's site, "If wine doesn't fall perfectly clear in 60 days, add another teaspoon of pectic enzyme and wait 2 weeks. If still not clear, add another teaspoon." Take your pick.
 

Dos_Locos_Brewery

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Fascinating. I guess on the timescale of wine fermentation/settling, the enzymes have enough time to clear a lot of pectin. Question for both dash14251 and summersolstice: What's the appeal of wine-from-jam? When I'm preserving my backyard bounty, I've always divided the fruit up front for various purposes (wine, jam, cobblers, ...). Seems like a lot of extra work to make it jam and then make it wine. Is it some flavor profile? Big honkin' pile of free jelly?
 

cyberlord

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Generic jam can be had on sale for way less the cost of fresh fruit, especially if you are making the wine outside the fruit season. You are correct, you divide up your bounty into how you want to preserve it, wine, jam, pie filling etc. But for those who do not have access to bounties of fruit during harvest the jam to wine process works quite well if you watch the must pH.
 

saramc

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Also jam wine is usually ready to consume as soon as it is clear, though it it much better if you allow it to age for at least 3 months. And with the cost of sugar being what it is, many times you can find a great deal on good quality jam, or hit the mother load at a Farmer's Market. Wine, ready-to-make, in a jar, just add water and a few chemicals. My favorite is my Boysenberry Jam wine, and then my ChocolateStrawberry Jam Wine. My blackberry is still oaking. Had a boatload of crabapple jam (thank you to the tree in my front yard) and I have the nicest dry white wine---made from jam.
 

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