How much is too much.........

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Ogri

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When it comes to pitching yeast???

From what I've read and understand it's important to start with enough viable yeast to go through primary fermentation then secondary, or bottling, so I'm tending to err on the side of "more is better" when pitching. Thinking that if I leave to ferment longer, 3, or 4, weeks then bottle condition for a reasonable length of time then everything should work out fine and dandy.

Is this the wrong mind set and should I be more discerning about the quantity pitched??

I'm only doing 2.5 gallon, Mr. Beer, batches so far and using a whole pack of safale S-04 and chucking the stuff that comes with the cans in too.:eek::mug:
 

944play

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You want at least SOME yeast growth. At typical recommended ale pitch rates of ca. 0.75 cells/°P/mL, you'll probably see something like 4-6 times growth. Anything over the standard pitch rate could be construed as overpitching, but it probably won't be something you can taste until you get into the near-zero-growth range. People here report getting good tasting beer by pitching on an entire yeast cake, but I wouldn't, unless it was a lager yeast, and the new wort was higher gravity and larger in volume than the beer being racked off. Even then, I'd prefer to rinse the yeast and clean the fermenter, then pitch the proper amount of slurry.
 

el_caro

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You want at least SOME yeast growth. At typical recommended ale pitch rates of ca. 0.75 cells/°P/mL, you'll probably see something like 4-6 times growth. Anything over the standard pitch rate could be construed as overpitching, but it probably won't be something you can taste until you get into the near-zero-growth range. People here report getting good tasting beer by pitching on an entire yeast cake, but I wouldn't, unless it was a lager yeast, and the new wort was higher gravity and larger in volume than the beer being racked off. Even then, I'd prefer to rinse the yeast and clean the fermenter, then pitch the proper amount of slurry.
I know you mean 0.75million not just 0.75 :cross: Those little buggers would really have to earn their keep.
 

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