How much CO2 is produced in secondary?

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dunbruha

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Hi all,

I have a small fermentation chamber, with room for only one vessel at a time. I would like to be able to transfer to a secondary to make room for the next batch. My thought was to transfer the beer into a CO2-purged (but not pressurized) 1/6 bbl Sanke keg, and seal it up and keep it at room temperature (72F). I was wondering: how much CO2 is produced at room temperature from a secondary fermentation? Would too much pressure build up during the course of the secondary? I would do approx. 10 days in the primary (at 65F), then another 2 weeks in the secondary. I brew mostly IPAs.

Do you think it would be safe to seal up the Sanke for a couple of weeks?
 

Yooper

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No co2 is produced when fermentation is finished, although things can make the residual c02 come out of solution, like if the temperature is raised, so an airlock might bubble for reasons like that.

Not only can you seal it up, but you can put c02 on it to start carbonation if you want to.
 
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dunbruha

dunbruha

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No co2 is produced when fermentation is finished, although things can make the residual c02 come out of solution, like if the temperature is raised, so an airlock might bubble for reasons like that.

Not only can you seal it up, but you can put c02 on it to start carbonation if you want to.
Thanks. I figured that was the case, but I want to be safe.
 
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