How much campden?

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vaidas

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I want to brew malt + extract beer. I will boil about 10 liters of wort and then I will mix it with extra 10 liters of cold water. I don't want to boil that extra 10 liters if water the day before brew, so I wonder could I use campden to kill all yeast that water might have. How many grams of campden should I use per liter of water? How long should I let it stay before mixing it with wort and pitching yeast?
 
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ncbrewer

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In beer brewing, campden is normally used to get rid of chlorine/chloramine in tap water. If that's your intent, you can use it at a rate of 1 tablet to 20 gallons of water for most municipal water. From what I've read, a somewhat higher rate can be used if you're not sure of the amount of chlorine/chloramine in your water. I crush and dissolve a tablet and then quickly add some to the boil kettle and some to the top-off water bucket, and stir both. It acts really fast. To be on the safe side, I add about one cup of the camden solution to each - that's about double the amount that should be needed. You can start the water boiling as soon as campden has been added. The top-off water will sit for a while - keep it covered.

Good luck!
 
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vaidas

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In beer brewing, campden is normally used to get rid of chlorine/chloramine in tap water. If that's your intent, you can use it at a rate of 1 tablet to 20 gallons of water for most municipal water. From what I've read, a somewhat higher rate can be used if you're not sure of the amount of chlorine/chloramine in your water. I crush and dissolve a tablet and then quickly add some to the boil kettle and some to the top-off water bucket, and stir both. It acts really fast. To be on the safe side, I add about one cup of the camden solution to each - that's about double the amount that should be needed. You can start the water boiling as soon as campden has been added. The top-off water will sit for a while - keep it covered.

Good luck!
Thank you for your reply! It is more clear now how to remove chlorine from water before boiling it. But in addition in fermenter I will mix wort + cold tap water that was not boiled before. I am afraid that tap water might have some wild yeast, so it would probably be good idea to boil water and let it cool before mixing it with wort in fermenter, but can I use campden instead of boiling to remove wild yeast from water? I gues I would need to use more campden (not sure how much) than when using it for removing chlorine, also I expect it would need to keep it for at least 24hours until all yeasts in water will be killed. Is it not usual campden use for beer brewing? Should I just boild water and let it cool before using it?
 

D.B.Moody

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I am afraid that tap water might have some wild yeast
Do no worry about wild yeast in the water. The primary problem with tap water (depending upon where you live and where you get your water) is usually chlorine/cloramine. Where do you live?
 
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kartracer2

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While on the subject of campden tabs, I see that there are two "flavors". Potassium metabisulphate as opposed to sodium metabisulphate. Which one is better for the job of chlorine removal? Or does it not matter?.
Cheers, :mug:
Joel B.
 

CascadesBrewer

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While on the subject of campden tabs, I see that there are two "flavors". Potassium metabisulphate as opposed to sodium metabisulphate. Which one is better for the job of chlorine removal? Or does it not matter?.

It is the metabisulphate component that is the key for chlorine/chloramine removal. At the levels used just for removal, the amount of potassium or sodium added is negligible. The campden tablets that I have are Potassium Metabisulphate.
 
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vaidas

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Do no worry about wild yeast in the water. The primary problem with tap water (depending upon where you live and where you get your water) is usually chlorine/cloramine. Where do you live?
I live in Europe, I have my own pump from underground water source. Water seems very clear and does not have any strange taste or smell. Is it possible to detect chlorine/cloramine from taste/smell? I will try to send water sample to a lab.
You mean I shouldn't worry abkut wild yeast in water and I can fill my fermenter with tap water and mix it with extract and ut will be fine?
 

CascadesBrewer

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You mean I shouldn't worry abkut wild yeast in water and I can fill my fermenter with tap water and mix it with extract and ut will be fine?

There is debate about if top up water should be boiled to sanitize it. I doubt that wild yeast in water is that big of an issue, but I could easily see other contaminates, especially in untreated well water. I would be more comfortable with boiling well water, and maybe sending it through a charcoal filter first.

Anyway, doesn't Metabisulphate only stunt yeast growth or reproduction and not actually kill yeast?
 

D.B.Moody

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I live in Europe, I have my own pump from underground water source. Water seems very clear and does not have any strange taste or smell. Is it possible to detect chlorine/cloramine from taste/smell? I will try to send water sample to a lab.
You mean I shouldn't worry abkut wild yeast in water and I can fill my fermenter with tap water and mix it with extract and ut will be fine?

Chlorine is a problem in treated water, not well water. Wild yeast in water just isn't something to worry about. But I cannot say the underlined part of your question. If your water looks, smells, and tastes good it's probably good, but the mineral content might conflict with the mineral content of the extract. You won't know until you brew with it. Relax and just try it.
 
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kartracer2

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I have been doing some reading on this subject and if only learned one thing so far it would be that I have been using at least twice as much as I need to. I have been using 1 tab per 5gal batch !!. :eek::eek:
Cheers, (I think)
Joel B.
 

jtgoral

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I have been doing some reading on this subject and if only learned one thing so far it would be that I have been using at least twice as much as I need to. I have been using 1 tab per 5gal batch !!. :eek::eek:
Cheers, (I think)
Joel B.
I do the same amount. The water in my city comes from Lake Michigan. The taste of my beers improved since I started using campbden tablets.
 
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