How many AMPs to power yoru mill?

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The Pol

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I have a good line on a reasonably priced (sub $40) 10amp drill for my Barley Crusher... what are yall using?
 

GreenwoodRover

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I also have a barley crusher. I just used my 18V Ryobi cordless. A fully charged battery, on the low rpm setting gets me thought about 10-12lbs. I think it could do more, but that's the largest grain bill my tun will currently hold.
I just milled 7# red Wheat and 5# pils for a hefe and it was still going strong at the end. Damn that wheat malt is like grinding gravel...
 
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The Pol

The Pol

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I am going corded, just because... I don't want ANY hassle on brew day. I know 10A is PLENTY, just curious what others are using.

Id use my 18V cordless, but I am afraid that I will not get through it all when I need to.
 

Bernie Brewer

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DeWalt cordless 18v. One fresh battery goes through enough grain for a 10lb batch with room to spare. And I have two spare batteries.
 

GreenwoodRover

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I see your point. I usually have anywhere from 3-5 fully charged batteries on my charge station at a time, but I guess that's the exception rather than the rule.
I would think 10A should be good. I've found I prefer a slower speed as I do ot have a good flour control system. I would just check to see if it has switchable control, vs a variable trigger. I also have a corded drill but it is a pain in rump to keep a constant speed via the pressure on the trigger...
 
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The Pol

The Pol

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So it looks like the the cordless drills are up to it? Now, the decision, should I stick with my 18V cordless, OR get the corded drill so that I have no worries.

Decisions, decisions.
 
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I use a makita 6.3 amp, 530 RPM, corded drill on my homemade crusher. Works great. Talk about torque!

How many RPM does that 10 amp do?

That reminds me, I need to go out and grind the grains for tomorrows brew!
 
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The Pol

The Pol

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The 10A is varaible 0-850 RPM
 
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Those high amp drills are great. DOwn side is they have enough torque to break an arm if you ever bind a drill bit. lol

Try for about medium speed on that thing. Torque over speed when it comes to grain grinding (less disintigrated husks = less tannins).
 

z987k

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Those high amp drills are great. DOwn side is they have enough torque to break an arm if you ever bind a drill bit. lol

Try for about medium speed on that thing. Torque over speed when it comes to grain grinding (less disintigrated husks = less tannins).
Ah the drill bit usually breaks first...

I use a 3/8" Milwaukee 3.5 amp 0-1000rpm corded drill. It's a lot more than a mill needs. Used to use them(Milwaukee) in construction, and there is no better corded drill out there.

18v DeWalt for the cordless.
 

Bernie Brewer

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So it looks like the the cordless drills are up to it? Now, the decision, should I stick with my 18V cordless, OR get the corded drill so that I have no worries.

Decisions, decisions.

The cordless drills are certainly up to it, but you have to get a good one. You don't say what kind yours is, but if it's not heavy-duty, well.....

One more thing about batteries for cordless tools: The more you use them the better off you are. If you leave them sit for two months and suddenly pick them up and put them to work, they won't last as long as batteries that are constantly being charged and drained. My batteries are 5 years old and still going strong, but I use them every day (when I'm working).
 

janzik

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I use my 18v DeWalt Cordless. I have 2 batteries, with one always on the charger, jic. I would really like to build a more permanent solution, so I don't have to go and grab my drill whenever I want to brew. Not that it's a hassle or anything, I just like the idea of having something rigged up real nice and whatnot.
 
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The Pol

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Bought a 7.3A 1/2" low speed drill today.

It is 0-550 RPM and has a dial to turn down the speed so I dont have to "feather" the trigger to get about 400RPM.

Should work NICE!
 

McKBrew

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Come on Pol, can't you have just one manual thing in your brewery or does everything need to be automated. It took me about 5min to hand crank 10# of grain.

I want the pilot flying my plane to have a good, tight grip on those flight controls, a grip developed by the handcrank of a BC, not some limp wristed fella who only has to hold the end of the drill. Nah, knowing you you'll build some sort of jig to hold the drill and a remote control to operate it.
 
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The Pol

The Pol

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Flight controls in my hand?

It is called an FMS... I can input the speed that I want the plane to fly at each flap setting. I tell the FO which flap setting to select, the plane automatically reduces the selected speed when the FO selects the flap setting and the autothrottles automatically reduce thrust. I can go from 600 knots to 145 knots without touching anything, really :rockin:

There is no need to touch the flight controls anymore :D

HEY, I was going to get a 10A drill, but this one has much better RPM management.
 
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The Pol

The Pol

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Here is the milling station!

 

TwoHeadsBrewing

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I also have a barley crusher. I just used my 18V Ryobi cordless. A fully charged battery, on the low rpm setting gets me thought about 10-12lbs. I think it could do more, but that's the largest grain bill my tun will currently hold.
I just milled 7# red Wheat and 5# pils for a hefe and it was still going strong at the end. Damn that wheat malt is like grinding gravel...
Ditto on the Ryobi 18v. I can get through a 25# grain bill as long as the battery is fully charged. The low speed setting seems to crush at the appropriate rate.
 
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The Pol

The Pol

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I think it was a good choice to go corded. I have a cordless, but it's annoying to have the battery wear down in the middle of milling.
I like it... new toy, dedicated to brewing... going to be doing some crush experiements after I do my "Aussie Chill" experiment.
 

planenut

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You could crush several pounds of base grain and then mash them 1 lb at a time with different ratio's and check the OG.. You know 1.25 qts per lb, 1.5 qts per lb 2 qts per pound etc.. You sound bored and I've been wanting to do it but have not made the time..

Just a thought.. :)

I'd reimburse you for the grain even... :)
 
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The Pol

The Pol

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I would love to do that, AND Id like to try different settings on my mill. Say.. .032, .036, .040, etc...

I am in an experimenting mood!
 

MOSFET

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I'd say torque and speed are the parameters of interest. My motor is rated 1.5A but draws 0.7A with no grain. This is at 120VAC. It's 1/10 HP and 5000 rpm with a 20:1 gear ratio, making the actual work shaft 250 rpm. The torque is very strong at 12.5 in-lb and mows through grain like a hungry hungry hippo.
 
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The Pol

The Pol

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My drill has a 7.3 amp motor... it has a dual gear reduction to slow it to 550 RPM, it is sold as a HD Industrial low speed drill. It is WAY overkill... but it was cheaper than most sissy drills at Lowes.
 

Got Trub?

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My drill has a 7.3 amp motor... it has a dual gear reduction to slow it to 550 RPM, it is sold as a HD Industrial low speed drill. It is WAY overkill... but it was cheaper than most sissy drills at Lowes.
I'd love to see what happens if the mill jams with that sucker torqueing away...

GT
 
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The Pol

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Probably break my limp girl wrist. :D
 

Jonnio

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It will pick the BC up and toss all the grain on the garage floor....so I hear from a friend.
 
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The Pol

The Pol

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It will pick the BC up and toss all the grain on the garage floor....so I hear from a friend.

I am sure it will work fine. Are yall setting your clutches in your drill or something? Or will the BC just stall them out if it gets too hard to handle?
 

Jonnio

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I am sure it will work fine. Are yall setting your clutches in your drill or something? Or will the BC just stall them out if it gets too hard to handle?
If you don't set your clutches and the drill is powerful enough it really will pick the BC full of grain up and toss it on the garage floor.
 
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The Pol

The Pol

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If you don't set your clutches and the drill is powerful enough it really will pick the BC full of grain up and toss it on the garage floor.
My new drill does not have a clutch, so I guess I am just destined to toss my BC all over, sweeet! :D
 

Jonnio

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I have only had one kernel get stuck in my BC, so its not a big chance, but keep a good firm hold on it to push it towards the bucket just in case.
 
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