How long to restore equilibrium to Kegerator

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dnslater

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So I built my kegerator 1 month ago and have been drinking my first kegged brew for several weeks - a hoppy pale. The Kegerator started as an old GE fridge, which I customized. It has the typical compressor bump on the inside, and I had to bend down the chill plate like many fridge conversions.


My issue is that I just added a second Keg on Saturday and have foam problems with the original keg. The second ball lock keg barely fit, causing me to need to remove everything and cut out the shelf supports from the side, now giving me an extra 1/2" to spare in width. When I had the one keg inside, I kept the 10' of 3/16" beer line laying on the bottom of the fridge next to the keg, which was a steady 38 degrees. With both kegs, I had to coil the beer lines on top of the kegs. After having the fridge open for an hour to remove the supports, everything warmed up. This morning, the area above the kegs was still 55 degrees..........

1. Will the area above the kegs eventually warm up given time? I'm assuming the foam is caused by the lines being warm - as heat rises and they are at the top of the kegerator. Of course I keep opening to check the thermometer, which is probably making it worse. Also, installation of the second keg, pushed the thermostat back close to the chill plate, which may be another issue.

2. Should I try to stuff the lines back behind the kegs? Keep in mind that this area has the 5lb CO2 tank, primary regulator, manifold and secondary regulator, so it is full. Also the cool plate is against the back, so I'm concerned about freezing lines.

Anybody else have similar issues that they overcame? Thanks!

FYI, first keg is at 12 psi, and the second (a stout) is at 6 psi and just beginning to carb.
 

zachattack

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If it didn't equilibrate overnight, it probably isn't going to happen. Of course, tucking the lines back down is the easiest solution, but if it were me I'd try to get a fan in there. It sounds like room is tight in the fridge, but a small PC fan doesn't take up much room at all, is cheap and quiet and costs almost nothing.
 

Roadie

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I use a fan similar to what is posted above and it works great in my 8 tap keezer so should be no worries there.
 
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dnslater

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Thanks All. Found this 120v fan on Amazon for $15. I think I will give it a go.
Just an update, I bought this fan and installed it down on the hump in the back of the kegerator - blowing up. I can take photos if anyone wants to see them. This is the low speed version of the fan and it is very quiet. Cannot hear it from outside of the Kegerator. Will update later after everything gets down to temperature again regarding how even the cooling is.

Seems to be decent quality. The case is all metal. It includes the power supply, two grills, and bolts/nuts to mount. Power supply unplugs, so I only needed about a 1/2" hole in the back of the fridge. I simply made a small 3 sided wood box and taped it on top of the box.
 

day_trippr

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That fan claims to use only 1.25 watts - that's remarkably efficient for an 80mm fan whether running on AC or DC.
The only down-side compared to a DC fan of the same size/performance is the potential shock hazard...

Cheers!
 
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