How long does your brew day take?

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zrule

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I have morebeer setup and it takes 7 hours from start to cleanup.
 

zrule

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I have morebeer setup and it takes 7 hours from start to cleanup! My old all-grain set (cooler mashtun etc) up took about 5 hours but not as much fun.
 

jabumbo

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if you count the time i let it sit there to cool down for pitching temps, i am nearing infinity. i really need to get myself a chiller...
 

planetscott

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When I am by myself, it goes much faster. I brewed last week and it was 3.5 hours. When I have others over, it's at least 5 hours. We are never in a hurry and it is very social.
 

RIC0

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I do full boils of either extract with steeping or partial mash and 3 hours is usually the max.

That's from start of flame to bucket/Carboy sitting in fermenting room and 95% of my mess cleaned up.
 

SagamoreAle

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5-6 hrs if I'm doing a single brew. Mostly I do two brews and overlap the boil on the first with the mash on the second, leading to a 7-8hr day.
 

jeffjm

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It depends. If I am doing no-sparge, 60 minute boil, and being efficient, under five hours. If I sparge, do a 90 minute boil, and take my time, it might be as long as eight hours. Sometimes I let the chilled wort settle for as long as 45 minutes, which definitely affects overall time.
 

sapper-nc

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5 or 6 hours to brew and cool for 10 gallons, add another hour or hour and a half if i parti-gyle 5 gallons of a session beer(15 total) .. the hardest part of a brewday by myself is im usually starving by the time im done
 

Transamguy77

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I'm in the 4hr range for a 10 gallon AG batch from mill to clean up. When I did BIAB I was consistently 3.5 hrs start to finish, I've had 1 8 hour brew day/night, I found out propane freezes under 30 degrees and was trying for a double 10 gallon brew day I think if I had realized the propane issue sooner I could have shaved off 2hrs easily.
 

Fantastical

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The fastest brew day I had was just over 4 hours. It was a hefeweizen that turned out nasty! (go figure) I ended up dumping it...

Most of my batches take 5-6 hours as well.
 

stevo4361

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5 to 6 here too, but usually includes either a racking to secondary, bottling, or kegging now as well as a brew session.
 

octopus

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It pretty much takes me 5 to 6 hrs each time. 90 minute boils seem to take a good chunk of that time.
 

jmh286

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I started heating my strike water at 4:30 pm and pitched my yeast around 10:15 pm. I did have a 75 min mash and two sparges that were longer than I planned because I was talking to neighbors.:cross:
 

CapnBry

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5 - 6 hours here too, all grain 5-8 gallon 4500W electric system

45 min strike heatup in HLT and mash tun, setup
60 min mash
15 min mash out
30-40 min sparge
20 min bring to boil
60 min boil
30 min chill
30 min cleanup

I've considered stepping up to 5500W elements but that would save me roughly 15 minutes overall so I'm not rushing to do it. In an attempt to brew on a weekday night, I've also put a timer on the HLT that makes it start heating up before I get home which saves about 30 minutes and makes it possible but rushed.
 

adamjackson

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AG, Batch Sparge, generally doing 1.080+ OG batches so it's quite a bit of grain. In the summer time, 5 hours due to a powerful fryer. Winter time I brew inside on our gas stove and getting the water temps up takes hours so winter brewing is around 8 hours.
 

justkev52

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Normally 6 hours. 6.5 to 7 hours for a 10 gallon batch
5 hours is about the best I ever get including cleanup.
Maybe I can get it down to 4.5 with my new burner.
 

Darkness

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I have done 60gal on 3-2 vessel rigs AG in 12 hours. That is with me and a couple of brew buddy's.
I have done 10gal in 3 1/2 hours by myself
 

lakeside53

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Depends on how I define brew day. If it's equipment haul out, through the brew process to cleanup and full equipment stow away, its always at least 6 hours. But I have a happy wife and a clean kitchen. If I have brewed recently (equipment and supplies not put away) and/or will brew again soon (equipment cleaned up but not stowed away), maybe 4 hours.
If I brew alone, and start at 7:00 AM I can easily be done by noon (implies less homebrew consumed during the process). Happy wife if I take her out to lunch. If my son comes over to help, and we listen to the (baseball, football, basketball) game while brewing and tasting past batches it can easily run to 6 hours. But I enjoy having him over, so what's the hurry.
If I'm brewing when the windchill is -25*F (yes, I have done that) it takes a lot longer to heat the kettle to boiling than it does when the heat index is 103*F (yes, I have done that also). But then again I can chill a batch a whole lot faster in the winter than I can in the summer.
Like I tell my golfing friends: Brew day takes just as long as playing 18 holes of golf. At the end of the day they have a piece of paper with (often large) numbers on it; I have 5 gallons of beer!
 

coyote68

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mine are usually around 5 hours however my last few were cut by about 40 mins by using a bucket heater to get my strike water ready while i sleep. i just set the timer to turn it on and when i start at 8 am my water is ready. the best part is it cut the cost down too by using less propane. ( theres a link in the forums for this )
 

Echoloc8

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Stovetop, 5-gal AG, 60-90 min mash, 90 min boil, immersion chiller with stirring & whirlpool: 5-6 hrs. Most important piece of equipment for time savings is a bucket heater/heat stick to supplement the wimpy stove-eyes.

It's surprising how little time for sitting and sipping there is when there's always sparge water heating, hop and other additions, sanitization and other clean-as-you-go chores to do.

-Rich
 

MalFet

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I've got about a 4 1/2 hour window to go from set-up to wipe-down, and after that I've got to leave the kitchen and the beer in whatever state it's in until I get home 12 hours later. It's amazing how much more efficient I have gotten since I started needing to be. The missus (understandably) doesn't like it when I leave the counters sticky.

When I've got a full day off with no time pressures, it takes me like 14 hours.
 

Dolomieu

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When i brew at my buddies place we/he gets two two 10gal batches done in about 8hours. I do a 10gal batch in about 5. Double batch brew days are worth it if you have 3 extra hours.
 

andvari7

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I don't normally time my brew days, but they've always taken between five and six hours, and I presume that the next one will, as well.
 

pwkblue

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I am at 5 hours for stove top all grain 5 gallon...but that includes an hour at the gym during the 70 minute mash. If I stay home and remain focused I am a little faster 4.5 hours from start to finish.
 

downtown3641

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If nothing goes wrong I spend about 4.5 hours on all-grain, batch sparge, and 60 minute mash and boil. I've gotten good at prioritizing and overlapping tasks. I'd say about 80% of my cleanup is done before I'm done chilling. Most of my setup is done, as necessary, during the process. For example, I get set up for the mash while heating my strike water, set up for sparging while mashing, get my boil additions ready while my wort heats to a boil, and so on. I even find time to clean a keg if necessary.

I do want to work on cutting my brew day down a bit. I feel like, if I can get everything done in less than four hours, I would be able to brew more often. So, eventually, I'll start heating my first runnings as I lauter, shorten my mash time if I'm able, and improve my chilling process in the summer. A better burner would help the process as well.
 

nachotime

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Did an all grain last night after work. I started boiling my strike water at 5:00p and pitched my yeast at 10:15ish... I could've cut that down by about an hour, but i had to make and eat dinner for myself and SWMBO. Also I did it on the stove as my propane crapped out last brewday and I've yet to take it in...

I'll never brew on my stove again as I never got a really nice rolling hotbreak.
 

lakeside53

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With this thread in mind I did a 5 gallon (robust porter) extract/steeped specialty grain batch last evening. Used all the equipment I have, nested steps wherever possible, cleaned up as I went. Filled my steeping pot at 4:00 PM, pitched yeast at 7:05 PM, into the primary in it's location with everything except my starter flask put away.
I could have made it in three hours flat except I over chilled the wort (easy to do in Feb in MN).
 
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