Quantcast

How long does Iodophor last?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

El Pistolero

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 29, 2005
Messages
3,584
Reaction score
16
Location
Houston
The sanitation that is...I sanitized a bunch more bottles than I used, and I'm wondering if they'll still be sanitized a week (or a month from now).
 

Janx

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Messages
1,677
Reaction score
24
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
No...unless you seal them, and even then, I'd personally still sanitize them. Iodophor kills all the buggies that are on a surface right now. When it dries, it's done. It doesn't provide a shield or anything against future buggies that will land on it.

Now, some folks cover the bottles with foil or something and use them a month later, and really, a clean, sanitized bottle is not going to be an attractive site for bacteria and wild yeast to go, but IMHO, Iodophor is cheap and peace of mind is a good thing. I'd re-sanitize them rather than take the risk.

Cheers :D
 

uglygoat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2005
Messages
2,765
Reaction score
10
Location
Clebland, OH
how long before the iodophor suspended in the water breaks down and is no longer effective?

like with chlorine, i can still smell bleach after a week of soaking, but the iodophor seems to fade after only a few hours....
 

Janx

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Messages
1,677
Reaction score
24
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
I agree...it seems to fade much more quickly than bleach.

I usually trust mine for a whole 5 or 6 hour brew session if I mix up a tub of it. But no longer than that.

We used to store our chiller with Iodophor solution in the coils. Bad idea. It resulted in infection. Now I run some bleach through the chiller before putting it away and then more bleach and the Iodophor before the next use. That system has never failed.

I don't really know what affects it (oxygen, light, heat, etc), but it does seem to break down fairly quickly. I actually like that because I don't have to worry about dumping it out in terms of it being harmful.
 

Sir Sudster

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
1,030
Reaction score
2
Location
Buda, Tx
I read on the idaphor web site that as long as there is an amber color your still good . Once you lose the color its time for more idaphor. Idophor kills cells as it dries. The drying process is part of the bacteria cell breakdown .
It doesn't take long. But, it does have to start evaporating. I always thought it killed on contact but this article states that drying is critical. My question was for how long? Till its completely dry?. Have I just been lucky all these years or am I just a real clean kind-a-guy. Don't think so.
 

Janx

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Messages
1,677
Reaction score
24
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Sudster said:
It doesn't take long. But, it does have to start evaporating.
Got a link on that? I've never heard such a thing.

This article agrees with you that color is a good indicator, but doesn't mention the evaporation thing. It does explain the concentrations needed.
 

uglygoat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2005
Messages
2,765
Reaction score
10
Location
Clebland, OH
well i went home and dumped the spent iodophor from sunday's brew sessin and refilled with hot water and chlorine and dumped my syphon equipment back in there... no sense having them floating in mucky spent iodophor and such... i'll just rinse and re-dip when i transfer batches tonight... :)
 

Sir Sudster

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
1,030
Reaction score
2
Location
Buda, Tx
Janx said:
Got a link on that? I've never heard such a thing.
.
I have emailed National Laboratories for info on the proper use of Idaphor as it pertains to sanitizizing Homebrew equipment. I'll post the response from them here.

I just can't find the document I read this from. So, since I can't back up my claim I am going strait to the Horses Mouth. Stand by for further clarification.
 
OP
El Pistolero

El Pistolero

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 29, 2005
Messages
3,584
Reaction score
16
Location
Houston
A very interesting read. If you believe the guy, it pretty much puts to rest any question of whether you should rinse or not.
 

uglygoat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2005
Messages
2,765
Reaction score
10
Location
Clebland, OH
all the info he gave on adequate concentration levels are on the side of the container the iodophor comes in... how did he not know how much to use and how much was adequate if he'd been using it for three years...
 

Sir Sudster

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
1,030
Reaction score
2
Location
Buda, Tx
At this point this is all the company would provide. I am going to keep pressing and see if I can't get something concrete from National.
 

uglygoat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2005
Messages
2,765
Reaction score
10
Location
Clebland, OH
according to George Fix, in An Analysis of Brewing Techniques at 12.5 ppm you need to maintain a contact time of 5 minutes to ensure that iodophor is effective as a sanatizer, at concentrations of 25 ppm three minutes is effective. (p. 114)

this book i picked up at the library, it is very scientifically oriented but provides alot of valuable info.


:)
 

Sir Sudster

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
1,030
Reaction score
2
Location
Buda, Tx
I just got a response from National.

"Products used for cleaning and disinfecting are chlorine bleach, quats or phenolics. Within the phenolic category are iodines and pine oils. Iodines and iodophor compounds are effective disinfectants that have a broad range of killing power. They are generally not used for disinfecting because they can stain surfaces and corrode metals. The best choice for cleaning and disinfecting are generally the quats."

What's up with this company. I would think the Homebrew market would be a nice fluffy feather in their cap but they are uninterested in providing any details.

Thanks T1master , where did this guy get his info? I guess you have to know somebody to get the real scoop. Guess the guys scared I'd sue him for "bitter beer face" or something along those lines..
 

uglygoat

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2005
Messages
2,765
Reaction score
10
Location
Clebland, OH
this author is a mathematics phd guru. he and his lab/institute set up a series of tests and wrote up the results, in addition to having a bibliography of scholarly works a mile long... check the book out at your local library.. it's heavy on science, but really easy to read.
 

Janx

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Messages
1,677
Reaction score
24
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
Sudster said:
Well, I sure have learned a few things about idaphor. I contacted the manufacturer of Idaphor and ask them for information on the use of their product in the homebrewing market. They wrote back and said "We are not in this field of expertice". But they did give me this link...it's quite informative.

http://www.bayareamashers.org/content/maindocs/iodophor.htm
Right. That's the same link I posted. So, we're dropping the theory that it has to evaporate to work? I really don't know either way, but I had never heard that and found it interesting.

FWIW, I've always treated it as a contact sanitizer in very low concentrations and it has never let me down.

Cheers :D
 

Sir Sudster

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
1,030
Reaction score
2
Location
Buda, Tx
I've also treated it the same way and haven't had a problem. I was just interested in the science portion of it. Sorry for the redundancy.
 
Top