How do you pronounce Saaz

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sirsloop

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Just curious...

I say it the ol american way - "sah-z"... but I'm pretty sure some people pronounce it like "zah-ts", "Sartz", or "Jah-tets". :p
 

GrantLee63

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I've always pronounced it Saaaaaaaaaaaaazzzzzz, as in Waaaaaaaaaaaazzzzzzz Up ?
 

AllHoppedUp

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What about Briess? Is it "breese" or is it "breeze" or is it "br-ice"? Never heard it spoken before . . .
 

EvilTOJ

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Tar-ghey.

I mean, I always pronounce it as "Sterling" at the LHBS because they NEVER have Saaz!
 

Danek

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I'd vote for "Zaatz" as the most correctificated way of saying it, but really I'd probably pronounce it however the guy at the LHBS says it. Otherwise, while I'm being super-authentic, he'd have no idea what the hell I'm talking about.
 

Kevin Dean

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I don't really care what the "right" way to pronounce it is but I mine rhymes with Jazz. :)

If you've ever read the series called "The Wheel of TIme" or really ANY fanatasy books you're bound to stop caring how to pronounce things.

Robert Jordan began all of his public speeches with pronunciations.

Egwene, Mazrim Taim, Logaine, Nynaeve, Aes Sedai, Asha'man, Tel'aran'rhiod.. :)
 
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SuperiorBrew said:
Some people claim that it's "the artist formerly known as Prince."

I prefer to think that if he wants his name to be a symbol with no associated letters or sounds, I get to pronounce it however I want. My pronunciation is as follows:

\ˈdüsh-ˌbag\
 

WortMonger

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Yuri_Rage said:
I always thought, "sahz," but I guess I know better now.

I wonder how many of us can correctly pronounce the following?

wort
trub
krausen
wort like wert(Bert and Ernie)
trub like troob
krausen like crow-zen

Hope I have been saying them right :)
 

elmetal

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he had it right... unless he edited.

I am wondering about trub. is it troob like boob or troob like the northern pronunciation of creek being crik.

is it troob or truhhhhb?
 

MattHollingsworth

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The link at the bottom of the first page has a good recording of the Czech for Zatec, which is Saaz. It's pronounced very much like Croatian, but that Z is like a Ž here. They pronounce the Z like the S in "pleasure" or like the J in French as in "Je". The C is pronounced like a TS. So, sorta like Zhatets.

"Saaz" is the German way of naming that hop.

The recording of the German is good too. Sounds like Zots.

Nice link. Thanks for posting that!
 

Budzu

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I lived in Czech Republic for almost a year, fell in love with beer while there.

When they have "c" at the end of the word like "zatec", it comes out like "ts". BTW in czech, that is TWO syllables, not "zaatz". It is actually ZAH-tets. With a hacek on the Z (a different letter in czech than an actual Z), making it as Matt described, like a rough "SH" sound. And the emphasis is always always on the first syllable in every czech word.
The word saaz is how its adapted elsewhere. I wouldn't pronounce any "t" in Saaz.
 

MattHollingsworth

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I lived in Czech Republic for almost a year, fell in love with beer while there.

When they have "c" at the end of the word like "zatec", it comes out like "ts". BTW in czech, that is TWO syllables, not "zaatz". It is actually ZAH-tets. With a hacek on the Z (a different letter in czech than an actual Z), making it as Matt described, like a rough "SH" sound. And the emphasis is always always on the first syllable in every czech word.
The word saaz is how its adapted elsewhere. I wouldn't pronounce any "t" in Saaz.
Is that Z like this?

Ž
 

Budzu

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Is that Z like this?

Ž
yeah, they call the symbol a hacek (by the way the c in hacek should also have a hacek above it, I don't know my international keyboard codes :p ) Usually the hacek changes a hard consonant to a soft consonant.
Hacek = HA-chek
 

Palefire

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I always thought, "sahz," but I guess I know better now.

I wonder how many of us can correctly pronounce the following?

wort
trub
krausen
I've been wondering about this too - I know how these words are "supposed" to be pronounced (a few years of German will teach you that), but it does seem as if more and more people pronounce these words as they'd come out in standard English. i.e. I hear a lot of people pronouncing "wort" as rhyming with "fort," "trub" as rhyming with "pub," and so on.

Don't necessarily want to start an argument about descriptive vs. prescriptive pronunciation, but at what point do "incorrect" pronunciations become so common that they're not really incorrect anymore (in the same way that nobody calls the city "Los An-heles")? Are we near or at that point for these words? I personally feel like a little bit of a ****** when I step into a LHBS and start talking about "troob" and "vehrt." Maybe that's just me, though.

Just writing little screeds like this to avoid doing work...
 

rico567

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What about Briess? Is it "breese" or is it "breeze" or is it "br-ice"? Never heard it spoken before . . .
Likely #1, definitely not #3, assuming its a German name/noun. In German, I before E is always pronounced long 'E'. E before I is always pronounced long 'I.'
 

Scooby_Brew

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I believe Saaz is a German name for a Czech town named Žatec. The Czechs call the hops from this town "Žatecki".
Saaz would be pronanced "Sahz'', Žatec is pronanced "Zsatetz" ("Zs" like in "Zsa Zsa Gabor"), and Žatecki is pronounced "Zsatetzky", (again, "Zs" like in "Zsa Zsa Gabor").
http://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Žatec
 

MattHollingsworth

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yeah, they call the symbol a hacek (by the way the c in hacek should also have a hacek above it, I don't know my international keyboard codes :p ) Usually the hacek changes a hard consonant to a soft consonant.
Hacek = HA-chek
Yeah, it's the same as here then. We have Ž, like the S in pleasure, Š, like SH, Č and Ć which are a hard and soft CH sound and Đ, like the G in George. And the C here is also like TS.

I have seen the Czech beer Krušovice here, for instance, and that is pronounced KrooShoVeetsEh with a rolled R.
 
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