How do you Mash in w/BIAB?

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BassManNate

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Huh. Was looking to get a paddle since I'm moving up from stovetop brewing. I've just used the largest spoon in the kitchen. Now I think I need to skip the paddle and get a giant whisk.
 

JJinMD

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The few times I tried to combine LODO with BIAB I put all the grain in the bag and then underlet the pre-boiled mash water into the boil kettle. This was one of the recommendations from the LODO community.

I think my efficiency dropped doing this if compared to my normal approach of adding the grain to boil kettle while stirring the mash water. However I was somewhat paranoid about stirring the underlet grain too much and introducing oxygen which would undermine the reason for underletting so that might explain the efficiency drop.
I do this too, and also have efficiency issues, even with a dunk sparge. It is nice, though, to just grind straight into the bag in the mash tun.
 

LitBrewing

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I never get dough balls. Set up two bags ahead of time. Grind your grist directly into a 5 gallon bucket. Pour dry grist into your bags setting in previously prepared LODO brewing water. This is essentially the same as under letting. I use what I call the DBIAB (double brew in a bag) method, keeps the bag weight less, easy to handle. I use a long stainless spoon. I also use insulating foam mash caps on more oxidation sensitive beers like Helles, Pilsners and IPAs.

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@Beermeister32 do you know what size clips those are?
 

Valve1138

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I grind my grains into a 5 gallon bucket.

Heat my strike water.

Then slowly pour the grains in.

Then I use my comically large 24” whisk.

Works great every time and not a lot of effort involved.
 
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