How do you know "how much is left in the keg"?

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wsmith1625

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Not an original idea, but I read it in another thread years ago and thought it was clever. Put 2 cups on your kegerator, one for full keg and one for an empty keg. Now put 50 pennies in the full keg cup. Every time you pour a beer, take a penny from the full cup and put it in the empty cup.
 

Jonakr

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Not an original idea, but I read it in another thread years ago and thought it was clever. Put 2 cups on your kegerator, one for full keg and one for an empty keg. Now put 50 pennies in the full keg cup. Every time you pour a beer, take a penny from the full cup and put it in the empty cup.
This would trip me up after 2 beers I think. "I put a penny in the...uh...oh hell!"
 
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well, i do it a few ways....sound & science. if you knock a keg with your knuckles the sound is a dead give away for how much is in it....and science, i count every 12oz pour and write it down and can get a good idea by looking at my records.....


i saw someone that keeps their kegs on a digital scale in the fridge that stays on 24/7 though...would be more accurate then my methods....but i just try to make sure i have ANOTHER full keg as back up at all times....

Bracc, I appreciate that you keep track of your pours, but if I did that I might realize I drink too much :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:.
 

bracconiere

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Bracc, I appreciate that you keep track of your pours, but if I did that I might realize I drink too much :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:.


lol, but then you'd be dealing with trying to gain a couple pounds instead of losing them....i was 176 couple months ago, now i'm down to 172....granted i don't lift and skinny fat...but still i need to get back up to at least 175, trying to finish off a huge plate of brown rice right now....


and yes i weighed the rice.....170g's dry, cooked it's a huge plate! it'[s really not a big deal to count....

1643423477258.png



:mug:

(i find i need to use my eyes to balance though!)
 

agentbud

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but this is the recipe from beer and brewing


I brewed the Weldwerks fitbits clone which was very good.

I have a question about this recipe if anyone knows the answer. The recipe calls for a 40 minute whirlpool with hop additions at the 40, 30 and 20 minute marks of that whirlpool. But it didn't say what temp it should be at. Do we start the whirlpool at flameout and just let the temp free-fall during the whirlpool and then cool it down after the 40 min or do we cool as we go (ie immersion chiller) during the whirlpool so that it is at pitch temp after the 40 mins is up? In other words, what temp should we shoot for at each of the 3 whirlpool hop additions?
 

RCope

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@agentbud When I brewed that "clone" 2 years ago, I cooled to 170 and did the first WP addition, then 160 for the second and 150 for the third. It was a bit tedious, but the beer came out great and very close to the real thing. I didn't want to start the WP over 170...that would add more ibu's than I'd want in that style. I don't recall if I came up with that schedule on my own, or if it was from another's version, but it worked. Cheers! Rick
 

yowzers

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I don't have one of these, but they seem pretty slick... I usually just pour beers until I'm suprised by the keg blowing.

Have 5 in my kegs and love them. Do remember to replace the indicator bead with the supplied magnet when you move the keg or the bead does fall off but that is about all you have to know to use them. Super simple and effective. Their floating dip tubes are also good and they don’t need weight added like the Torpedo dip tubes
 

DuncB

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@agentbud
I think that I cooled to 80 celsius for first addition and then so on down. Are there any clues about that in the video?
They also like to do the second dry hop under pressure if memory serves me.
 

bwible

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Henbrew

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I just use a fish/luggage scale that has a hook. Takes seconds to get a measurement and even with everything connected it'll let me know if a keg is about to kick within a pint or two. You just need to know the empty keg weight.
 

Merkur

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These Plaato units and the flow-meter based system are the only solutions that will work practically with my set-up. However since I have six active kegs +one on deck, it gets expensive quickly. $800 just for keg monitoring and not improving the brewing process is a lot!

I have two Komos kegerators built under the bar and can’t say enough about how well they work. However with each kegerator holding four corny kegs, it is not practical to use the magnet + ball solution or the luggage scale method. I am leaning towards the DIY KegCop or scale systems that are detailed on this forum.
E623D2F1-D052-4388-848F-305146BD8EE8.jpeg
 

rtstrider

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OK up front I'm new to kegging but it didn't take me long to think "how much is in the keg"? I'm thinking weigh an empty keg, weigh the partial, do some math on weight of beer and determine how much is left in the keg.
How do you do it? Thanks for any better way,
John

I use a floating dip tube. I notice that the last beer or three tends to be cloudy. Now when coming up to the last few pours I notice the beers taste a tad yeasty compared to the first pours.

Back when using a regular dip tube it was the opposite. The last pours would be nice and clear (even with gelatin). They were always the cleanest!
 

Imhoppy

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I give the keg a gentle tilt from time to time, and then again when I think it's getting close to empty. It's about as easy as figuring out if my beer glass is nearly empty too. Lol.
 

odie

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Not an original idea, but I read it in another thread years ago and thought it was clever. Put 2 cups on your kegerator, one for full keg and one for an empty keg. Now put 50 pennies in the full keg cup. Every time you pour a beer, take a penny from the full cup and put it in the empty cup.
hmmm...works as long as all your pours are a "standard" 12oz. Pints will not last 50 servings.

I pour assorted sizes, often smaller pours so they don't get warm before I finish the glass.

But a super simple idea to track general usage.
 

wsmith1625

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I've never tried it myself, but I assume it gets you close. I actually tap the keg with my finger and listen to the sound. Kind of like thumping a watermelon. My method doesn't tell my how many pours I have left, but lets me know that I'm getting low.
 

william.roy.c

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I've never tried it myself, but I assume it gets you close. I actually tap the keg with my finger and listen to the sound. Kind of like thumping a watermelon. My method doesn't tell my how many pours I have left, but lets me know that I'm getting low.
I have used tally marks on a pad before. It gives you a chance to adjust for the size of the pour a little. Mixed success there.
Mostly, when I start to think that the keg might be getting low, I just see how much force it takes to tip it a little.
 
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