How do you dispense your big batch/table wines?

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jeebuzz

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Opening bottle after bottle gets old quick. I have tried 1/2 gallon and 1 gallon bottles, but they can be heavy and awkward. Am thinking of moving to either a spigot type container or possibly kegging. Spigot seems a lot simpler, but finding a non-glass, esthetically pleasing one that seals well is actually difficult. Kegging seems a little too involved but does get you extra cool points.

I did see this neat countertop dispenser online, but apparently they have just discontinued it and it isn't available anymore. Thoughts?
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jeebuzz

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I guess my family and friends drink more than most (lol) just tired of sooo many bottles. Apparently though, the counter keg I posted about above is back ...


BUT, for the cost of it + shipping, I could buy a corny keg setup on a cyber Monday deal for not much more...which I did.... so going to try kegging 5 gallon batches of wine here in a week or so. Fingers crossed!
 

doug293cz

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I guess my family and friends drink more than most (lol) just tired of sooo many bottles. Apparently though, the counter keg I posted about above is back ...


BUT, for the cost of it + shipping, I could buy a corny keg setup on a cyber Monday deal for not much more...which I did.... so going to try kegging 5 gallon batches of wine here in a week or so. Fingers crossed!
The linked vessel is only useful for serving still beverages over a short time frame (hours not days or weeks) as it backfills with air as the beverage is dispensed. It is not useful for even short term storage. Exposing wine to air causes it to oxidize, and the flavor can degrade rather quickly. That's why boxed wines have a collapsible bladder inside so that air backfill is not necessary.

When kegging wine, you need to pressurize and serve with nitrogen, not CO2. If you use CO2, you will carbonate the wine over time.

Brew on :mug:
 
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jeebuzz

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Indeed you are correct, that keg would not be for long term at all.

The plan is to actually use argon (100% not mixed) instead of nitrogen for kegging, since I have that on hand already for tig welding. Pretty excited to give it a go.
 

Coffee49

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My thought is at bottling time, with proper bung adapter, tubing and fittings a nitro cylinder regulating a 3# psi line in and a spigot for dispensing would be an efficient way to eliminate bottle cork labor.
 
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