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Hops for an English IPA

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hopbrad

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for my next brew I want to go for an English IPA. I have the follow hops but would like to try and steer clear of the American C hops if possible for this recipe:

- Magnum
- Warrior
- Styrian Goldings
- US Goldings
- Willamette
- Pride of Ringwood
- Nugget
- Chinook
- Cascade
- Centennial
- Simcoe

any suggestions on hop schedules?
 

Piratwolf

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I'd go with Willamette and Styrian Goldings. Earthy, floral & spiciness = delightful. Only possible problem I can think of is the amount of Styr. Goldings you'd need--might get a bit vegetal.


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hopbrad

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what about nugget? that could alleviate the amount of low AA hops

1 oz magnum or nugget @ 60
2 oz willamette and styrians blend @ 15
1 oz nugget @ 10
1 oz willamette and styrians blend @ 0
1 oz willamette and styrians blend Dry Hop
 

DSorenson

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Are you going for traditional?

Can't beat east kent goldings and fuggle. Willamette is bred from fuggle, so I would say you could roll with that. Magnum isn't traditional, but a great bittering hop.
 
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hopbrad

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it doesn't have to be by the book traditional. I brew alot of Citrusy/Piney American Style IPAs so i want to go for a different profile on this one.
Good to know about Willamette.
i dont have EKG only US Goldings and Styrian G's. I read that Styrian Goldings is a slovenian fuggles. So piratwolf's suggestions seem to be on par.

Are you going for traditional?

Can't beat east kent goldings and fuggle. Willamette is bred from fuggle, so I would say you could roll with that. Magnum isn't traditional, but a great bittering hop.
 

DSorenson

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it doesn't have to be by the book traditional. I brew alot of Citrusy/Piney American Style IPAs so i want to go for a different profile on this one.
Good to know about Willamette.
i dont have EKG only US Goldings and Styrian G's. I read that Styrian Goldings is a slovenian fuggles. So piratwolf's suggestions seem to be on par.
Willamette can be used to great effect. Floral and a tad spicy. Full Sail's Pale Bock is a SMaSH beer, using pale and willamette. Wonderful beer. I have also used it, but not in great enough quantity to recreate that experience. It's not a very aggressive hop.
 

Phil_Ozzy_Fer

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Off the list you made, I would try the Magnum for bittering and Styrian Goldings for Aroma. I just made a "Standard Bitter" (2 more weeks until fully carbed!) and I used Challenger for bittering, Styrian Goldings for Aroma, and dry-hopped with Fuggles.
 

RonPopeil

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I would go with the goldings, willamette, magnum and pride of ringwood. Nugget could be used to bitter but in small amounts and time will need to be given in the bottle as nugget lingers for a bit.
 
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hopbrad

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I would go with the goldings, willamette, magnum and pride of ringwood. Nugget could be used to bitter but in small amounts and time will need to be given in the bottle as nugget lingers for a bit.
When you say Nugget lingers, what do you mean? flavor or bitterness or both?
Regardless I think you might be right tho. I have brewed some Ambers with it and that comment got me thinking, Those Amber's tended to be weirdly earthy upfront, then after a month or 2 it subsides to the caramel sweetness.

And i used it recently on a Brown ale - the hop additions were:
1 oz nugget @ 60
1 oz willamette @ 15
1 oz styrian golding @ 10
1 oz willamette @ 5

I drank my first bottle pretty young, but same thing, SUPER earthy.
Would those other hops contribute to this as well or is it mostly the nugget?

this English IPA recipe i would like floral and spicy. im not a big "earthy" fan. If an american hop is needed to steer away from it, i wouldnt be opposed to using an OZ or so to help compliment it.
 

JKaranka

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I think you're spot on with williamette, styrians and nugget. Dry hop with styrians too. I'd consider a 30m addition of nugget. To be fair, I think I brewed exactly that in an IPA that I let sit in cask on a few oz of hops for four months.
 

RonPopeil

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When you say Nugget lingers, what do you mean? flavor or bitterness or both?
Regardless I think you might be right tho. I have brewed some Ambers with it and that comment got me thinking, Those Amber's tended to be weirdly earthy upfront, then after a month or 2 it subsides to the caramel sweetness.

And i used it recently on a Brown ale - the hop additions were:
1 oz nugget @ 60
1 oz willamette @ 15
1 oz styrian golding @ 10
1 oz willamette @ 5

I drank my first bottle pretty young, but same thing, SUPER earthy.
Would those other hops contribute to this as well or is it mostly the nugget?

this English IPA recipe i would like floral and spicy. im not a big "earthy" fan. If an american hop is needed to steer away from it, i wouldnt be opposed to using an OZ or so to help compliment it.
I use Nugget as a bittering hop and when I do I can taste it in a fresh beer. It takes a few days for it to mellow out and leave you with your late additions.
 

JKaranka

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Btw, I wouldn't discard non English hops from a British IPA. I got good results in a pale with EKG and Saaz, and Hallertau and Spalt feature quite heavily in historic recipes (together with Poperinge, which were considered inferior hops).
 
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