Hop schedule opinions

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Velnerj

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I do 60 min addition for roughly 80% of the bitterness, then all whirlpool addition at around 180F. Roughly double the amount of whirlpool hops for dry hop. I dry hop in cold beer after/during cold crash.
 

AlexKay

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Simcoe might overpower the NZ hops; just saying’. Anyhow, I hop with something neutral (Magnum) at 60, then with the other hops at 10, because why not, and then a 10-minute hop stand at 160 F, and then a dry hop at fermentation temp around 2 days before packaging.
 

Jag75

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Just created a recipe in Grainfather ! The hop schedule added all hops at 60 min. That can’t be right ? Any opinions
thanks

Nope. Something glitched or you didn't adjust

I just use Magnum for bittering in all my IPAs . Super clean and natural. Just as @AlexKay states.
 

The Mad Brewer

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I am tryin a simple Juicy IPA, and most recipes call for dry hopping, some say 4 day some say 11, so my question is, do i drop them after its been fermenting 4 days or with 4 days left do I drop the hops?

I have 3 oz mosaics, 2 Citra an 2 cascade. I was going to dry hop when I rack into my fermenter at 7 days, is there a right or wrong here?.
 

Velnerj

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I am tryin a simple Juicy IPA, and most recipes call for dry hopping, some say 4 day some say 11, so my question is, do i drop them after its been fermenting 4 days or with 4 days left do I drop the hops?

I have 3 oz mosaics, 2 Citra an 2 cascade. I was going to dry hop when I rack into my fermenter at 7 days, is there a right or wrong here?.
I would ask what is your goal? Set it and forget type set up? Are you going for maximum extraction? Do you want anectdotal experience or sciencey stuff?

I have found cold dry hopping (around 3c) for only 1 or two days creates great results and there is some science to back that up...

I think most brewers do anywhere between 3-7 days and are also satisfied.
 

IslandLizard

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I was going to dry hop when I rack into my fermenter at 7 days,
Isn't your beer in a fermenter already?
Or do you mean racking to a "secondary" fermenter?

I would definitely skip the secondary. Especially with hoppy beers, unless you can do so with a closed transfer (under CO2), which needs additional equipment. Any oxidation is detrimental to your (hoppy) beer.

Without (semi-)closed transfer capabilities to prevent beer being exposed to air (oxygen), best is to add dry hops to your (primary) fermenter after fermentation has finished. Or when it's almost finished, with a few (3-5) points of attenuation left to go. Dry hop for 3-5 days, then package (keg or bottle).

Here's an interesting recent article on dry hopping methods:
 

The Mad Brewer

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Isn't your beer in a fermenter already?
Or do you mean racking to a "secondary" fermenter?

I would definitely skip the secondary. Especially with hoppy beers, unless you can do so with a closed transfer (under CO2), which needs additional equipment. Any oxidation is detrimental to your (hoppy) beer.

Without (semi-)closed transfer capabilities to prevent beer being exposed to air (oxygen), best is to add dry hops to your (primary) fermenter after fermentation has finished. Or when it's almost finished, with a few (3-5) points of attenuation left to go. Dry hop for 3-5 days, then package (keg or bottle).

Here's an interesting recent article on dry hopping methods:
Yes sorry I meant my secondary
 

IslandLizard

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If you have CO2 available (such as for kegging) you can stream CO2 into the headspace while adding your hops. Then flush or purge a few times, to reduce the amount of air that rode in.

Just for that purpose, I drilled a 1" accessory hole into my bucket lids on the opposite side of the airlock hole. Through that hole I can add hops, sugar syrups, wood cubes/chips, fruit, etc. That while streaming in CO2 at a decent rate through the airlock hole. That method definitely reduces the amount of air ingress (oxygen being 21% of that). I then purge the headspace a few times for good measure.
 

The Mad Brewer

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If you have CO2 available (such as for kegging) you can stream CO2 into the headspace while adding your hops. Then flush or purge a few times, to reduce the amount of air that rode in.

Just for that purpose, I drilled a 1" accessory hole into my bucket lids on the opposite side of the airlock hole. Through that hole I can add hops, sugar syrups, wood cubes/chips, fruit, etc. That while streaming in CO2 at a decent rate through the airlock hole. That method definitely reduces the amount of air ingress (oxygen being 21% of that). I then purge the headspace a few times for good measure.
thx
 

Brooothru

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Isn't your beer in a fermenter already?
Or do you mean racking to a "secondary" fermenter?

I would definitely skip the secondary. Especially with hoppy beers, unless you can do so with a closed transfer (under CO2), which needs additional equipment. Any oxidation is detrimental to your (hoppy) beer.

Without (semi-)closed transfer capabilities to prevent beer being exposed to air (oxygen), best is to add dry hops to your (primary) fermenter after fermentation has finished. Or when it's almost finished, with a few (3-5) points of attenuation left to go. Dry hop for 3-5 days, then package (keg or bottle).

Here's an interesting recent article on dry hopping methods:
Very interesting and informative read. I've favored shorter duration dry hopping periods (3-5 days), but this summation of studies shows how even shorter times and lower temperatures result in better outcomes. Thanks for providing the link.
 
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