Hop extract

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alix101

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I was thinking on an easy way to get I big hop hit in my beer ... Then thought maybe a but of chemistry and extract it somehow .. However I've only just discovered you can buy hop extract .. So my question is gas anyone tried it ...?????
 

izatt82

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Well what do you mean by big hop hit? Bitterness, flavor, or aroma? What kind of beer are you thinking of?
 
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alix101

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Sorry about the spelling .. Fat fingers on my I phone ...anyway , I was thinking of brew dogs punk Ipa ... Or if you in the U.S something Like a two hearted ale .. So aroma more than the bitterness ..
 

dancness

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Are you talking about pre-hopped malt extract, or actual hop extract?

Personally I'd rather use regular hops (whole/pellet) than mess with some weird hop extract. The fresher, the better. I somehow doubt the "freshness" of hops extract.
 

amartinez

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Yeah, I'd have to agree with dancness, if you want a big hop hit, why not use more hops?
 
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alix101

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Maybe , I'll just stick with traditional methods .., I've not heard of this extract before .., perhaps there is a reason :)
 

jd3

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It seems as though Pliny The Elder uses Hop Extract at the brewery.
 

remilard

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Yeah, I'd have to agree with dancness, if you want a big hop hit, why not use more hops?
If you boil a lot of hops, it tastes vegetal. If you dry hop heavily, it tastes grassy. If you can reduce the vegetal matter, you reduce these negative characters.

Russian River uses it, Lagunitus uses it, Westvleteren uses it, remilard has passed 4 beers to the NHC second round using it in two years.
 
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alix101

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Thanks ... Ive decided to give some extract /oil ago it's the only way to find out for myself if it's any good or not .., I'm sure some brewery's are using this sort of stuff for aroma ...:)
 

bobbytuck

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Northern has Amarillo hopshot now. I've been using their previous version of Hopshot for bittering, and it works great. A bit too spicy for late additions, but I plan to make an all-Amarillo hopshot beer this weekend with about 10ml or so of the Hopshot -- two full tubes. One tube for bittering, then one for late additions.

I also routinely use 1-2ml of hopshot for first-wort hops in nearly every beer I do. Hopshot is pretty cheap, too. Not sure if this is what you meant, but it works great.
 

remilard

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If you want more aroma, than you need hop oil's not hop extract. That"s for bittering. I
use hop oils from hop union sometimes on my IIPA with good success. There kinda pricey for the homebrewer though. hope this helps!!! Cheers!!! http://www.hopunion.com/hopproducts.html
Co2 extracted hop resin (eg hopshot) can be used for aroma, dry hopping. It's just the resins extracted from the hops.

Isomerized alpha acid extract can only be used for bittering. I know of no craft brewing that uses that, but B3 sells it.
 

remilard

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Northern has Amarillo hopshot now. I've been using their previous version of Hopshot for bittering, and it works great. A bit too spicy for late additions, but I plan to make an all-Amarillo hopshot beer this weekend with about 10ml or so of the Hopshot -- two full tubes. One tube for bittering, then one for late additions.
That is great news. I wanted to experiment with hop-shot in dry hopping for the same reason I use it for bittering but you can tell when you add it to the boil it is really spicy.

If NB carried hopshot in simcoe and columbus too (I think there might be some columbus in the original but I would have to man up and try it late or dry to see) I wouldn't buy any american hops. That would be awesome to get like 90% + of the post boil volume in the keg on an IIPA. Also zero grassy or vegetal character.
 

zachary80

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Northern has Amarillo hopshot now. I've been using their previous version of Hopshot for bittering, and it works great. A bit too spicy for late additions, but I plan to make an all-Amarillo hopshot beer this weekend with about 10ml or so of the Hopshot -- two full tubes. One tube for bittering, then one for late additions.

I also routinely use 1-2ml of hopshot for first-wort hops in nearly every beer I do. Hopshot is pretty cheap, too. Not sure if this is what you meant, but it works great.
How did this work out?
 

bobbytuck

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How did this work out?
Fantastic! I've been using the Amarillo hotshot for first wort hopping in all my beers lately (about 1ml for FWH) and then for late "hop burst" additions: 15, 10, 5, 2 and knockout. I made a hopped version of Denny's Rye with 5ml of the Amarillo hopshot (FWH, 20, 10, 5, 2) in addition to the normal recipe hopping schedule. I let the Rye IPA steep before cooling in my makeshift whirlpool (no whirlpool really -- just steeping with constant recirc) for 45 min. I can't whirlpool due to the heating element in my BK.

Anyway, I bottled it last week and cracked a bottle a couple days ago to see how things were going: it's still green, but the hopping is fantastic -- mellow but it's definitely front and center. Nicely carbonated. The hopshot adds the aroma and flavor but seems a bit mellower overall. I've not really used it for bittering -- but I suspect two full tubes at 10ml total could be used for big beers.

In addition to the hopping, I ended up hitting 5.35 mash pH @ 70F and added -- this is by memory -- 5g or so gypsum split between the mash and boil, along with 3g CaCl2 split between mash and boil. I also added about 3oz acid malt (either 3oz or 4oz -- again from memory) to the recipe grain bill and I acidified my sparge from 7.7 to 5.8 with 85% phosphoric. Used 100% Chicago/Lake Michigan water, charcoal filtered with one campden tab crushed in the 15 gallon HLT.

I mashed a bit lower -- 149F, IIRC -- instead of the recommended 152. Hit 1.074 OG.

Gave it a 3 minute blast of O2. Fermented with Safale05 (no Denny's Fav50 due to the blazing hot weather in Chicago). 2 packs 05 @ 64F for 18 days. Finished at 70F for 48 hours. 1.017 FG in the bottle.

Big, nice beer -- the rye adds a great spiciness (not too much -- but you can definitely tell this one is rye). This will condition nicely. Highly recommend the Amarillo hotshot -- makes FWH very quick and is easy to use for final additions. I'd probably use a bit bigger FWH addition next time around and see how that impacts the flavor.

The other Hopshot Northern sells is great for bittering, but I made the mistake of using it late in the boil -- and it was way, way spicy. Too spicy. But I'm stocking up on the Amarillo. The other key thing about these extracts is less crud in the BK.
 
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