Homemade Bread Thread

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deadfall

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This is a place to post anything bread related. Here's some of my pictures.

dscn4702_opt-62037.jpg

dscn4705_opt-62038.jpg

dscn4613_opt-61872.jpg
 

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Nice! I was going to make some sourdough this weekend, but I forgot to mix the dough up in time to rise and bake. I've made it a few times with the "artisan" crust, but I wanted to try it with a more normal crust, which would have been a bit less tough to chew.
 
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deadfall

deadfall

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Nice looking crumb. How did you get the rolls in the fourth picture to open up like that. Does it have to do with the depth of the cut? Beautiful looking bread pics.
 

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Nice looking crumb. How did you get the rolls in the fourth picture to open up like that. Does it have to do with the depth of the cut? Beautiful looking bread pics.

Thanks, Kaiser rolls, the video shows how to form them, just recently started to do them after many years of making loafs.
 
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deadfall

deadfall

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Thanks for the video.

Here's a picture of the crumb I'm getting. I'm hoping to get air pockets eventually.
dscn4707_opt-62044.jpg
 
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deadfall

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I find that a wetter dough will produce a more open crumb, it poses it own problems when free forming as I usually do.
Check out The fresh loaf.com, lots of great information.

I've been getting huge air pockets in the over night proof I've been doing. When I form the loaf and proof it again it isn't the same. I tried a longer second proof on one of the loaves and it just didn't work. It ended up tearing during the proof and fell in on itself. Might have just been that loaf because of the sunflower seeds in it. I've also been using olive oil in the bowls to stop the dough from sticking too much. That may have something to do with it also.
 

ChefRex

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I've been getting huge air pockets in the over night proof I've been doing. When I form the loaf and proof it again it isn't the same. I tried a longer second proof on one of the loaves and it just didn't work. It ended up tearing during the proof and fell in on itself. Might have just been that loaf because of the sunflower seeds in it. I've also been using olive oil in the bowls to stop the dough from sticking too much. That may have something to do with it also.

I don't use olive oil in the bowl just flour. Are you steaming at all?
 

terrapinj

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getting a sourdough starter from a friend this week or so and been reading up on bread making - great timing for this thread

any good noob websites/resources?
 
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deadfall

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I don't use olive oil in the bowl just flour. Are you steaming at all?

I tried steaming in the oven. That consisted of preheating the oven to about 100 and shutting it off. Then I added a pot of boiling water to it. It kinda worked but didn't really steam the bread. The outside of the loaf dried out. The method was flawed.

I intend figuring out a way to incorporate one of those single element burners and a pot of water. to create a proper proofing cabinet. I do the repairs at a local bakery so I know how simple they are. There isn't enough room in a normal oven to do much. I'll probably have to build a separate cabinet.
 

ChefRex

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I tried steaming in the oven. That consisted of preheating the oven to about 100 and shutting it off. Then I added a pot of boiling water to it. It kinda worked but didn't really steam the bread. The outside of the loaf dried out. The method was flawed.

I intend figuring out a way to incorporate one of those single element burners and a pot of water. to create a proper proofing cabinet. I do the repairs at a local bakery so I know how simple they are. There isn't enough room in a normal oven to do much. I'll probably have to build a separate cabinet.

What I meant was do you introduce steam in the oven as you bake. I heat the oven as hot as it goes, 550F in my case let it preheat for quite a while, when the beeper goes of means the air is that temp, I use a pizza stone that will take a bit to be at temp.
when I'm ready to bake I have a 1/2 to cup of boiling water which I pour into a small cast iron pan that is in the bottom of the oven producing steam witch prevents the crust from forming to soon restricting the oven spring.
 
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deadfall

deadfall

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What I meant was do you introduce steam in the oven as you bake. I heat the oven as hot as it goes, 550F in my case let it preheat for quite a while, when the beeper goes of means the air is that temp, I use a pizza stone that will take a bit to be at temp.
when I'm ready to bake I have a 1/2 to cup of boiling water which I pour into a small cast iron pan that is in the bottom of the oven producing steam witch prevents the crust from forming to soon restricting the oven spring.

I do that. I fill a few ramekins with water for while its baking. I also been spraying the sides of the oven with water right before I put my loaves in. Oh I should mention don't spray the bulb. It will explode and you will have to throw 4 beautiful rolls covered in glass away.

You saw this picture of my over night proof.
dscn4701_opt-1-62036.jpg
I've had problems with the bread drying out after this point, before they go in the oven. There's a art to the timing. I'll get it. I sure wish I had taken photos of the first couple of loaves.
 
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deadfall

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Thanks for all the help ChefRex.


I've been maintaining 2 starters for about 4-5 weeks now. Both are from scratch. The one on the left is just flour and water. The one on the right was started using juniper berries from my yard. At this point I'm feeling the flour and water one is the stronger starter.
dscn4715_opt-62050.jpg
 

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i got my ap flour based starter from our friend last night - fed it once last night and once this am - 100% hydration with 100g each RO water and unbleached flour

I feel like a lot of this is flying over my head already

how much do you usually feed your starter when kept at room temp? do I need to build up the starter in steps to get to the amount of starter called for in the recipe or can it be done in one step?

i see vastly differing rise times in a couple recipes - 12-15 hours for one 3-4 hours for another - is it personal preference at a certain point? i know you can let it rise too long, but how long is usually too long?

i'd like a nice tangy SF style bread - i've read that using some whole wheat flour or rye flour can help enhance that flavor - best to build up part of the starter with the other flour or just add it to the recipe?
 

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I'm by no means an expert but I'll give this a go...

i got my ap flour based starter from our friend last night - fed it once last night and once this am - 100% hydration with 100g each RO water and unbleached flour

I feel like a lot of this is flying over my head already

how much do you usually feed your starter when kept at room temp? do I need to build up the starter in steps to get to the amount of starter called for in the recipe or can it be done in one step?

I keep my starter on the counter under a cheese cloth and feed it every day, usually a few spoonfuls of flour and if it needs it a bit of pre-boiled water. My starter is pretty thick by design as from what I understand it's a bit stronger and more potent (as opposed to being watery).

The thing about starter is it will get stronger the longer it works, so Days 1-5 there probably won't be much going on and if you use it, you'll likely not get a good rise (giggity). If you're keeping your starter in a plastic container and you can see small bubbles on the side of the container, that means there's some yeast in there that's ready to work. Trust me, when you get it built up you won't be able to keep up with the baking!

i see vastly differing rise times in a couple recipes - 12-15 hours for one 3-4 hours for another - is it personal preference at a certain point? i know you can let it rise too long, but how long is usually too long?

In my experience, starter works best with a longer rising time. 3 Hours seems really short, butI've seen sourdough recipes that call for added yeast which I guess could be risen in 3 hours or so. In other words, the sourdough starter is only meant to add tang, not actual yeast.

For my money I've had much better results with 10-12 hour rise.
 
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deadfall

deadfall

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i got my ap flour based starter from our friend last night - fed it once last night and once this am - 100% hydration with 100g each RO water and unbleached flour

I feel like a lot of this is flying over my head already

how much do you usually feed your starter when kept at room temp? do I need to build up the starter in steps to get to the amount of starter called for in the recipe or can it be done in one step?

i see vastly differing rise times in a couple recipes - 12-15 hours for one 3-4 hours for another - is it personal preference at a certain point? i know you can let it rise too long, but how long is usually too long?

i'd like a nice tangy SF style bread - i've read that using some whole wheat flour or rye flour can help enhance that flavor - best to build up part of the starter with the other flour or just add it to the recipe?

I'd keep it on the counter till your happy with it's performance. I tried whole wheat but I found it was eating through it to fast and smelling really nasty. I almost tossed it because of the whole wheat. I later realized it was eating through the Whole wheat so fast and that why it was smelling bad.

I found temperature played a big part in the smell of the bread. The colder the ferment the less sour. The warmer the more sour.

I'm really happy with letting mine rising over night in my kitchen. I'd guess it's 60 in there over night. Your going to need to figure out what works for you. Temperature and the health of your starter is going to play a big part in how fast it rises. I'd play it by ear and adjust as necessary.
 

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Well, this is my feeble attempt at french bread. You can bet I'll be trying this again but aiming for something a bit less dense. as it is, it is delicious.
IMG_6511.jpg

IMG_6512.jpg
 

ChefRex

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I'd keep it on the counter till your happy with it's performance. I tried whole wheat but I found it was eating through it to fast and smelling really nasty. I almost tossed it because of the whole wheat. I later realized it was eating through the Whole wheat so fast and that why it was smelling bad.

I found temperature played a big part in the smell of the bread. The colder the ferment the less sour. The warmer the more sour.

I'm really happy with letting mine rising over night in my kitchen. I'd guess it's 60 in there over night. Your going to need to figure out what works for you. Temperature and the health of your starter is going to play a big part in how fast it rises. I'd play it by ear and adjust as necessary.

I use a starter fed white bread flour, I use King Arthur's, although I have one fed rye I need to play with.
Pretty much all my bread will have whole wheat, white whole wheat (which works great!)or rye.
Generally go with a long rise/ferment.
 

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I use a starter fed white bread flour, I use King Arthur's, although I have one fed rye I need to play with.

Pretty much all my bread will have whole wheat, white whole wheat (which works great!)or rye.

Generally go with a long rise/ferment.


Are you going from fridge to oven with your loaves? When I use the sourdough culture it seems like it really makes my loaves pool when they're at room temperature. I can't get the hydration level I want because when the dough is that wet it won't hold its shape. I was thinking cold dough may be a little more cooperative


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ChefRex

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Well, this is my feeble attempt at french bread. You can bet I'll be trying this again but aiming for something a bit less dense. as it is, it is delicious.
View attachment 177200

View attachment 177201

Is this your first bread or first french bread? Your crumb looks ok, did you cut it while still warm, hard to resist but it should cool before cutting, ripping large chunks is another story;)
Just like beer the more you make the better it gets. Iv'e made a lot of loafs and in the beginning they where dense, read and learn.
 

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Is this your first bread or first french bread? Your crumb looks ok, did you cut it while still warm, hard to resist but it should cool before cutting, ripping large chunks is another story;)
Just like beer the more you make the better it gets. Iv'e made a lot of loafs and in the beginning they where dense, read and learn.

First bread. Not counting things like banana bread, pumpkin bread etc. talking yeast and such, this is a first not counting a few bread maker attempts which are dump from a box and start.

Thanks for the confidence. I'll definitely try more. I don't have anyone else to give things like this to so my neighbors get a lot of stuff from me.

I let it cool about 30 minutes before I cut. I couldn't resist and I was hungry. :) it is tasty.
 

ChefRex

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Are you going from fridge to oven with your loaves? When I use the sourdough culture it seems like it really makes my loaves pool when they're at room temperature. I can't get the hydration level I want because when the dough is that wet it won't hold its shape. I was thinking cold dough may be a little more cooperative


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Generally they have been out for a couple of hours, so they're slill not room temp, believe me I have had plenty of loafs slump and flatten out but I prefer a free form loaf over a pan.
PLease no one think i know what I'm doing here, I just play alot;)
 

ChefRex

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First bread. Not counting things like banana bread, pumpkin bread etc. talking yeast and such, this is a first not counting a few bread maker attempts which are dump from a box and start.

Thanks for the confidence. I'll definitely try more. I don't have anyone else to give things like this to so my neighbors get a lot of stuff from me.

I let it cool about 30 minutes before I cut. I couldn't resist and I was hungry. :) it is tasty.

Bread yeast I assume? For a first loaf and freeform they look great!
If you want a sourdough starter let me know.
 

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Bread yeast I assume? For a first loaf and freeform they look great!
If you want a sourdough starter let me know.

Okay! I'm going to try this recipe once more, then the one TN Gabe posted. Lord knows I don't need this bread though. But it's so good!
 

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Has anyone tried dumping the bottom bit of a homebrew into their starter/bread?
Part of me wants to try it to see what sort of flavor the yeast could give, but the sane, non-buzzed part of me is saying that's a stupid idea.
 

ChefRex

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Has anyone tried dumping the bottom bit of a homebrew into their starter/bread?
Part of me wants to try it to see what sort of flavor the yeast could give, but the sane, non-buzzed part of me is saying that's a stupid idea.

Go with it! Never done in the starter but have replaced all water in the dough.
Recently started using wort, more sugar for your little friends to eat, I especially like using dark beers/wort:mug:
 
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deadfall

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Okay! I'm going to try this recipe once more, then the one TN Gabe posted. Lord knows I don't need this bread though. But it's so good!

It's hard to beat a freshly baked loaf of bread. I know I have been eating more recently.
 

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This is a place to post anything bread related. Here's some of my pictures.

dscn4702_opt-62037.jpg

dscn4705_opt-62038.jpg

dscn4613_opt-61872.jpg

These are stunningly fab. A little while ago I did a slow rise (uses hardly any yeast) then drop in a very hot preheated Dutch oven for a great crust. I think I used German Krustenbrot flour mixed with a little spelt flour and some un bleached, was pairing with a Moroccan tagine so I put some black nigella seed & sesame seeds on it. Wish I had the time to do a spread like your pics. Great job, great chefs make for great brewers:)
 

terrapinj

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Has anyone tried dumping the bottom bit of a homebrew into their starter/bread?
Part of me wants to try it to see what sort of flavor the yeast could give, but the sane, non-buzzed part of me is saying that's a stupid idea.

I thought about adding the dregs from my next sour beer I open to a separate starter and feeding for a while to see what it would do - idk if the bugs and brett would eat the starch quick enough but figured I have little to lose

baking my 1st loaf tomorrow from the starter i've been feeding all week - very active - pretty excited

also picked up a bottle of the latest Almanac Farm to Table which uses sourdough starter with Brett - think I'll crack this one with a loaf of our SF Style sourdough bread
http://www.almanacbeer.com/ourbeer/sourdough-wild-ale/
 

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Trying my hand at an easy sourdough sandwich bread right now. First time making bread, now I just have to wait for the extremely long rise time.
 
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