Homebrew Talk 3D Print Thread.

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chazam

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What would be a good glue for a plastic brewer equipment? I have a fermzilla and I f'd up the spiral of the plastic lid when tightening a carbonation cap ball lock too tight. So I bought a new lid and made new spirals for the old lid. Now I need to glue the 3d-print with the fermzilla lid. Glue suggestions?
 

LBussy

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Depends on what the 3D part is printed with. ABS will work with solvent-based cement. Your safest bet may be a urethane-based glue like Gorilla. Take the old lid and do a test glue there to make sure you know what you are getting yourself into.
 

chazam

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Depends on what the 3D part is printed with. ABS will work with solvent-based cement. Your safest bet may be a urethane-based glue like Gorilla. Take the old lid and do a test glue there to make sure you know what you are getting yourself into.

I should have ABS-filament or at least basic PLA if it's any good. If you don't mind once I get my 3d part printed, I'll find some glues and ask you if they're any good? Although I might be able to pick one with that advice alone.
 

LBussy

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The filament would be determined by what you intend to do with it I guess. PLA is the easiest to print, ABS requires a heated chamber for most parts.

Here's a bunch of different urethane cements just to give you an idea of what might work:

 

cgriffith

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@chazam I can't picture what your trying to solve, but if appearance and tolerance is not an issue, I have had luck using plastic as a glue. Meaning, I use an old soldering iron to heat up and melt PLA parts to attach to each other. One can use filament off the roll to add extra plastic around welds if needed.
 

cgriffith

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I love this thread. Very inspirational and reminds me that there are so many uses in our hobby for custom items. Here is a Carb-cap wrench I made. Super-simple, but I was having trouble unscrewing these things by hand.

edit: I have been printing for 4 years, Ender 2 v2, Openscad, Cura.
 

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Peter Walker

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Couple silly little things I printed up today. First is a marker for the flow meter I recently picked up out of the classifieds here. Second is some temporary camlock plugs since they were out of stock at Brewhardware. Both printed in PETG for slightly better performance but neither use will really see significant heat. The outside of the flowmeter only really gets slightly warm and the plugs are just to serve mostly to serve as hose hangars.
Just came across this thread, you would have a link for the .stl file for the cam lock plugs would you?
 

LBussy

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Very nice. I love that more folks are doing color layers. It really adds a lot to the prints for minimal effort. Printing anyway - sometimes designing for that is a challenge.
 

Deric

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DuncB

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Print 9 on the back of the first can and flip it up when you have slid them all across. Next time you get them all across flip up the next can it has 17 on the back of it and so on 24 on the third can and 30 on the 4th can.
Not sure how much further your tally would need to go but it would be a fun way to keep a record of the keg content.
 

GoeHaarden

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I've always been super fascinated by 3D printing and I think I want to make the plunge.

Anyone with a Prusa regret buying it or wished they would've gotten something else to start? Is it worth it?

Looking at the Prusa as a one and done, but also looking at the Anycubic Viper to start out with.

I'm trying to avoid my brewing pitfalls of starting out low and upgrading only to fill my garage with items that would fetch pennies on the dollar.

Any thoughts?
 

LBussy

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Anyone with a Prusa regret buying it or wished they would've gotten something else to start? Is it worth it?
I have never spoken to anyone that actually owns a Prusa that was disappointed that they bought it. I am now on #2, after selling #1 when I thought I was "done." @Thorrak has one as well and he's pretty pleased I believe. Buy once, cry once. There are other fine printers out there, but few open-source systems have the back-investment in developing the platform and the software that Prusa has.

I highly recommend the textured sheet, you will never go back to a smooth one. I bought both, and never use the smooth one.
 

Brewdog80

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I haven't found many items for homebrewing to 3d print. I've make a couple of drip trays,
And a couple of inserts for my refrigerator. I've a Prusa mk3s that I make tons of stuff with. It's paid for itself several times over. Been way more set and print than my old tevo. Buy it if you want to print and not just tinker
 

khannon

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I too have an MKS3+ from Prusa.. Been just over a year. I love it, it works great. Only problems I've had is with PrintedSolid PLA+. Well worth the investment. Just finished printing a Pluto gun holder for my rubbermaid cooler to serve from a 2.5Gal keg this weekend. I've used it for more than brew stuff, but in the brewing realm, I've done pegboard mounts for hoses, corney QD parts to keep hoses open for drying, the aforementioned pluto gun holder, tap handles, clips and holders for all the duotight stuff, hose organizers, dust covers for all the quick-disconnect stuff...

I thought about buying a cheaper printer, but after doing the research I bought the Prusa. I would suggest buying it to put together yourself as it really helps to know how it all works when you need to take something apart to clean or replace(and you will).
 

GoeHaarden

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Thanks everyone. All great info.

I've tried to learn stuff about printing but it all kinds of goes over my head, more of a hands on learner and I think I need to just get one and go to town.

I highly recommend the textured sheet, you will never go back to a smooth one. I bought both, and never use the smooth one.
Good to know when buying it. Does this have to do with the first slice ?adhesion?

I've a Prusa mk3s that I make tons of stuff with. It's paid for itself several times over.
Yeah, I just enjoy making/building things and I feel like a 3D printer just expands the tool box

I would suggest buying it to put together yourself as it really helps to know how it all works when you need to take something apart to clean or replace(and you will).
Yeah, I think it would definitely help me in the long run learning how it all goes together.

Thanks all. Almost 100% on the Prusa, just have to have a heavy home brew night to help me click the purchase button. Hopefully, I'll be posting prints on here soon...
 

Brewdog80

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I used a glass sheet on my old machine and one trick I used was a spritz of aquanet hairspray to hold down pla. Works great on the textured sheet. Washes off easy when you go to petg....
 

khannon

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Thanks all. Almost 100% on the Prusa, just have to have a heavy home brew night to help me click the purchase button. Hopefully, I'll be posting prints on here soon...
This, I went back and forth for a while.. Finally my wife pushed me into it, of course she is a biology teacher and saw some really cool models of DNA and Covid that I could print for her as teaching aids, so I had an easy couple of projects.

Then you get into it a bit, and you get silly things like a neighbor saying "This knob broke", and your reply being "Give it to me, I'm sure I can print you a new one", followed by a four pack of Treehouse showing up on your front porch and you think "Wow, what a great investment". Your mileage may vary here..

On the note of the smooth vs textured sheets, I only bought the smooth PEI spring steel sheet with my Prusa and have been very happy. I'm probably 30 rolls of filament in, I use one side for PLA, one side for PETG(anything that goes outside or in the car), and I've thought about buying another as this one is getting a bit "used", maybe I'll buy the textured on next to see the difference.

Also, for what it's worth, the Prusa assembly manual is awesome.. Not only pictures and words and broken into easily completed segments so you can do it over a few days, but they send a bag of gummy bears that they specify a set number after completing each section as a reward..

The other thing worth looking into is the Ikea LACK table enclosure.. easily printable. There are modifications that can replace most(or all) of the plexiglass with those corrugated lawn election signs. I built a exhaust fan with a filter for mine. Cuts down the noise and any smells/fumes pretty well.

3D printing also has a surprisingly(or maybe not) community. Like brewers, they have a tendency to (over?)share.
 

LBussy

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Good to know when buying it. Does this have to do with the first slice ?adhesion?
Yes and no - I previously had the model without the spring steel sheets and printed directly on the bed (was meant to - had some sort of covering on it .) PLA was always fiddle, but PETG was a NIGHTMARE.

The texture does seem to up the adhesion quite a bit for PLA, but most importantly for me it allows removal of PETG without the screaming and crying I used to go through. No further treatment with anything (other than keeping it clean) is needed. I print almost exclusively PETG now because it’s just a nicer print IMHO.

On this subject, if you print TPU on anything, make sure to use something like UHU glue stick. It’s not there to stick it down, it’s to let you peel
It off. You have been warned. :)

On the note of the smooth vs textured sheets, I only bought the smooth PEI spring steel sheet with my Prusa and have been very happy.
There’s a degree of personal preference here. I think the texture works better for PLA BUT my largest preference here is because of the texture it leaves on the print. With a smooth sheet it always looked like the part was melted in a pan. The texture is not really noticeable except that all sides of the print are uniformly not 100% glass-like. It’s hard to explain but most non 3D folks would not know which side was the bottom.

The other thing worth looking into is the Ikea LACK table enclosure.
+1 on that. I had to fiddle with mine, and I remixed the filament reels, but that’s a real nice setup.
 

GoeHaarden

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Finally my wife pushed me into it...
Lucky you, I've got to use my budgeted "fun" money and play it off for a while until I print things that makes her life easier. Lol

Wow, what a great investment". Your mileage may vary here..
I've got a few jigs/tools from Rockler and other woodworking sites and I swear half (or more) of the parts are 3D printed. I know this thing would pay for itself.

The other thing worth looking into is the Ikea LACK table enclosure.. easily printable
This is awesome. I haven't even bought a printer yet and my mind has already drifted into "well, what am I going to put it on? Should I build it out of plywood, pre-made, or what...."

But this looks like a very clean and tidy solution. Pretty cool

The texture does seem to up the adhesion quite a bit for PLA, but most importantly for me it allows removal of PETG without the screaming and crying I used to go through. No further treatment with anything (other than keeping it clean) is needed. I print almost exclusively PETG now because it’s just a nicer print IMHO.

On this subject, if you print TPU on anything, make sure to use something like UHU glue stick. It’s not there to stick it down, it’s to let you peel
It off. You have been warned. :)

Good to know for sure. I guess flexible material would probably be hard to remove from a flexible plates. Makes sense but probably easily overlooked - the first time 😂

I've always wanted to print my own TPU phone case. Just thought it would be cool.


Does anyone run Octoprint?
 

BrewerBrad82

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Does anyone run Octoprint?
Octoprint is awesome, and has a ton of really cool plugins. I have been running it for a few years, and the constant development of it is a huge plus. There are always new updates/upgrades coming out and I really love the Octolapse plugin. The biggest problem you will have with Octoprint right now is finding a Raspberry Pi for a decent price. I am running on a Pi 3 B+, but will work with most Pi models other than the original or a Zero/Zero W. I have another printer I want to run on Octoprint, but will be waiting until the Pi prices come back down, and then will likely run it on a Zero 2 W or a Pi 3. Model 4 is just way overkill for this application, but will certainly work if that is what you can get your hands on. This vid is a little old, but is a great way to start off in the world of Octoprint plugins: (as an aside, Michael of Teaching Tech has what I consider easily the best guides on most things 3d printing)

 

BrewerBrad82

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I dont often post in here, but have always followed this thread. I am currently running on a heavily modified Ender 3 outfitted for high temp filaments, and just completely rebuilt my original printer (had it since 2015) from the ground up. Toss in a bit of proficiency with CAD (I love Fusion 360) and this is an incredibly rewarding hobby!
 

GoeHaarden

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I dont often post in here, but have always followed this thread. I am currently running on a heavily modified Ender 3 outfitted for high temp filaments, and just completely rebuilt my original printer (had it since 2015) from the ground up. Toss in a bit of proficiency with CAD (I love Fusion 360) and this is an incredibly rewarding hobby!

I looked into the Enders, but it seem like it requires a fair bit of tinkering. Although I do love to tinker I find that I don't have a much free time as I used to devote to issues that may or may not arise.

I've read that any troubleshooting/tech support is basically just the online community, and company support is non-existent. Do you feel this is true?

It is a required addition IMHO.

Lol. Thought so
 

NickTheGreat

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I swore I wouldn't read this thread any more. I've held out on a 3D printer for so long . . .
 

GoeHaarden

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The biggest problem you will have with Octoprint right now is finding a Raspberry Pi for a decent price. I am running on a Pi 3 B+,

Yeah, I recently looked at prices of these things and I should've stocked up years ago. Geez. Luckily, I have a couple 3B+'s laying around, good to see it'll work for Octopi.

If you are looking for an out-of-box no-frills printer, the Prusa is the way to go.

Yeah, it's just the price jump thats getting me. Especially for a complete beginner.
 
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