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Home Depot buckets for fermenting

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Monkey

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I have been using Home Depot buckets for primary fermenting. They have been working great.

They were under $3, and my home brew store sells lids for bottling buckets (they have an area to insert an airlock). Their lids fit onto the Home Depot buckets.
The total cost for bucket and lid is around $5

Home Depot's cheap orange buckets are made of HDPE(2), which, from what i understand, is food safe

If anyone knows of a reason I shouldn't be doing this please let me know.


Just thought I'd mention this, in case anyone is looking for a great deal on fermentation buckets.
 

Revvy

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I have been using Home Depot buckets for primary fermenting. They have been working great.

They were under $3, and my home brew store sells lids for bottling buckets (they have an area to insert an airlock). Their lids fit onto the Home Depot buckets.
The total cost for bucket and lid is around $5

Home Depot's cheap orange buckets are made of HDPE(2), which, from what i understand, is food safe

If anyone knows of a reason I shouldn't be doing this please let me know.


Just thought I'd mention this, in case anyone is looking for a great deal on fermentation buckets.
There's been a ton of threads on that topic, most of it filled with fear mongering, and a fewe folks that have actually come to the same conclusions, or talked to folks, that although not marked as "food grade" they are indeed, "food safe."

And several people do use them, either as fermenters or bottling buckets.

If it works for you, then don't let anyone dissuade you. Like I said, plenty of people use them.

:mug:
 

Stagnasty

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Do you drill em and put in a spigot??? I have been wondering about em also. I have used drywall buckets to make wine with before (I do drywall so I have 100's of buckets), but in the last few years they have quit putting the rubber gasket in the lid,,,, thought of trying a lid from the brewhouse, just ain't got around to it, but the buckets I have been getting from the local shop, I have had to drill and put in a spgoit.
 

Brew-Happy

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Do you drill em and put in a spigot??? I have been wondering about em also. I have used drywall buckets to make wine with before (I do drywall so I have 100's of buckets), but in the last few years they have quit putting the rubber gasket in the lid,,,, thought of trying a lid from the brewhouse, just ain't got around to it, but the buckets I have been getting from the local shop, I have had to drill and put in a spgoit.
Stagnasty,

There are a number of people on here that use a piece of plexiglass as a lid, ie no seal at all. Look around for "Open fermentation". I wouldn't sweat the seal, although you don't get the nice burble burble without it. I have a couple of icing buckets from a bakery that do not have the rubber gasket and they worked fine for apfelwien and they were free!
 

Boerderij_Kabouter

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https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/has-anyone-ever-used-orange-home-depot-buckets-118095/ a good read....

My take is that you can brew in whatever you want. Will you instantly grow a third arm because you fermented in a Homer bucket? No. But you could eat off a lead plate for a long time with no effect too...

I am wary of FDA approved food grade plastic. And an unregulated plastic bucket with color dye is pretty near the top of my list for stuff I don't want anything I eat sitting in.

As to everyone who says they have fermented in Homer buckets and their beer is fine: No offense meant, but I really don't take taste comments from the net (with a few exceptions) very seriously. 90% of people seem to think their homebrew is better than commercial beer when I know that at least 95% of HB is worse than craft beer... As such, I take taste comments with about a pound of salt.

Ferment in what you like, they are your swimmers to kill as they say.
 

Stagnasty

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Stagnasty,

There are a number of people on here that use a piece of plexiglass as a lid, ie no seal at all. Look around for "Open fermentation". I wouldn't sweat the seal, although you don't get the nice burble burble without it. I have a couple of icing buckets from a bakery that do not have the rubber gasket and they worked fine for apfelwien and they were free!
Thanks,,,, that gives me hope,,, I will try the bucket lid without the gasket, then, I can drill it for the air-lock, and I HAVE learned from here, that the air-lock activity is not a true sign of success for fermentation. I also have two types of air-locks,, one haveing MUCH more entertainment value than the other. I keep four 6 gal buckets going, cause when you drink light beer, you need a bunch of it !!! Thanks again
 
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Monkey

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Thanks,,,, that gives me hope,,, I will try the bucket lid without the gasket, then, I can drill it for the air-lock, and I HAVE learned from here, that the air-lock activity is not a true sign of success for fermentation. I also have two types of air-locks,, one haveing MUCH more entertainment value than the other. I keep four 6 gal buckets going, cause when you drink light beer, you need a bunch of it !!! Thanks again
yeah.. i just bought the blue lids from the expensive home brew store buckets and used them on the orange home depot buckets. they fit the same
 
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Monkey

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https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/has-anyone-ever-used-orange-home-depot-buckets-118095/ a good read....

My take is that you can brew in whatever you want. Will you instantly grow a third arm because you fermented in a Homer bucket? No. But you could eat off a lead plate for a long time with no effect too...

I am wary of FDA approved food grade plastic. And an unregulated plastic bucket with color dye is pretty near the top of my list for stuff I don't want anything I eat sitting in.

As to everyone who says they have fermented in Homer buckets and their beer is fine: No offense meant, but I really don't take taste comments from the net (with a few exceptions) very seriously. 90% of people seem to think their homebrew is better than commercial beer when I know that at least 95% of HB is worse than craft beer... As such, I take taste comments with about a pound of salt.

Ferment in what you like, they are your swimmers to kill as they say.
so, you don't brew in anything plastic right? you just use glass carboys?
 

Ernie3

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My Home Depot sells lids too! They are also gasketed.

I only use the buckets to clean/sanitize in though. I did see the #2 on the buckets and then checked my true brew fermenting pails and they to are a #2.
 
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Do you drill em and put in a spigot??? I have been wondering about em also. I have used drywall buckets to make wine with before (I do drywall so I have 100's of buckets), but in the last few years they have quit putting the rubber gasket in the lid,,,, thought of trying a lid from the brewhouse, just ain't got around to it, but the buckets I have been getting from the local shop, I have had to drill and put in a spgoit.
Personally I wouldn't brew my beer in any bucket that once contained drywall mud in it.
 

Steiger66

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I would question the use of drywall compound buckets. There's more of an opportunity of using damaged buckets from the use of tape knives. Too much room for infection.
 

Brew-boy

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Ever walk into a LHBS and see several buckets stacked inside each other? I wonder how many micro scratches they have by stacking or pulling them out of each other.
 

Stagnasty

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Personally I wouldn't brew my beer in any bucket that once contained drywall mud in it.
Why??? Everything in a drywall bucket is organic,,, the making of the bucket involves petroleum, just like the buckets in the LHBS. I understand the idea of "scartches" in the bucket,,, but don't see any differance in an empty mud bucket and/or a CLEAN bucket (stacked on other buckets). Can you expalin the differanc?
 

Stagnasty

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I would question the use of drywall compound buckets. There's more of an opportunity of using damaged buckets from the use of tape knives. Too much room for infection.
I think I'll give it try, as I turn a bucket every week (I have enough, I primary them for 4 weeks and then bottle) I use the brew master buckets cause I didn't see enough (entertaining) bubble action from the mud buckets (no rubber gasket on the lid), but when I dumped em after 4 weeks, there was nothing floating on em,,,, might be a neat experiment,, as a batch only costs me 6 bucks. I'll let ya know, but in 6 weeks,, I guess I'll have to start a new thread on this one...LOL
 

Mista_Sparkle

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Ive got one home depot fermentor going in the closet with 4 gallons of apfelwein, its been in there 31 days and will be going in the bottle friday.

Anyway, if you are looking to go the route of a homer bucket fermentor, they can be had for real cheap, the buckets are something like 1.98, the lids are 99¢. you can pick up a proper 3/8" grommet for 80¢ or so and an airlock for $1.50 so total cost would be under $7 which is $2 less than my lhbs charges for an ale pail. If you decide to use the homer bucket lid, you will need to drill a 1/2" hole for the grommet. Also, you can find the grommets in the little fastener trays so you dont have to go hunting for them.
 

Steiger66

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Why??? Everything in a drywall bucket is organic,,, the making of the bucket involves petroleum, just like the buckets in the LHBS. I understand the idea of "scartches" in the bucket,,, but don't see any differance in an empty mud bucket and/or a CLEAN bucket (stacked on other buckets). Can you expalin the differanc?
Buckets stacked is one thing..Sharp tools are used for applying drywall mud. Which involves scraping the inside of the bucket.
 

fire943

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https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f11/has-anyone-ever-used-orange-home-depot-buckets-118095/ a good read....

My take is that you can brew in whatever you want. Will you instantly grow a third arm because you fermented in a Homer bucket? No. But you could eat off a lead plate for a long time with no effect too...

I am wary of FDA approved food grade plastic. And an unregulated plastic bucket with color dye is pretty near the top of my list for stuff I don't want anything I eat sitting in.

As to everyone who says they have fermented in Homer buckets and their beer is fine: No offense meant, but I really don't take taste comments from the net (with a few exceptions) very seriously. 90% of people seem to think their homebrew is better than commercial beer when I know that at least 95% of HB is worse than craft beer... As such, I take taste comments with about a pound of salt.

Ferment in what you like, they are your swimmers to kill as they say.
So you don't drink milk, yogurt, or anything in a plastic colored container? It must make shopping very hard. Even Whole Foods insn't color-plastic free. I also believe my taste buds may be better then yours:rockin: but again its only an opinion:mug: BTW I only use glass...well, unless I'm using plastic
 

Stagnasty

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Ive got one home depot fermentor going in the closet with 4 gallons of apfelwein, its been in there 31 days and will be going in the bottle friday.

Anyway, if you are looking to go the route of a homer bucket fermentor, they can be had for real cheap, the buckets are something like 1.98, the lids are 99¢. you can pick up a proper 3/8" grommet for 80¢ or so and an airlock for $1.50 so total cost would be under $7 which is $2 less than my lhbs charges for an ale pail. If you decide to use the homer bucket lid, you will need to drill a 1/2" hole for the grommet. Also, you can find the grommets in the little fastener trays so you dont have to go hunting for them.
Thanks so much,,,, my LHBS charges $26 for a bucket complete,,, so even with haveing to buy a spigot,, its still way cheaper.
 

remilard

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Ive got one home depot fermentor going in the closet with 4 gallons of apfelwein, its been in there 31 days and will be going in the bottle friday.

Anyway, if you are looking to go the route of a homer bucket fermentor, they can be had for real cheap, the buckets are something like 1.98, the lids are 99¢. you can pick up a proper 3/8" grommet for 80¢ or so and an airlock for $1.50 so total cost would be under $7 which is $2 less than my lhbs charges for an ale pail. If you decide to use the homer bucket lid, you will need to drill a 1/2" hole for the grommet. Also, you can find the grommets in the little fastener trays so you dont have to go hunting for them.
So the comparison is $7 and a little bit of labor for a 5 gallon fermenter vs $9 and no labor for a 7 gallon fermenter?

Forgive me if I am underwhelmed at the value of the home depot bucket.
 

Stagnasty

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So the comparison is $7 and a little bit of labor for a 5 gallon fermenter vs $9 and no labor for a 7 gallon fermenter?

Forgive me if I am underwhelmed at the value of the home depot bucket.
I can see that,,,, but those unworthy ones of us that LOVE light beer, we need a bunch of buckets,,,, and I personally think that $19.00 savings is worth the time of drilling two holes
 

remilard

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I can see that,,,, but those unworthy ones of us that LOVE light beer, we need a bunch of buckets,,,, and I personally think that $19.00 savings is worth the time of drilling two holes
But, the Ale Pail's are cheaper per unit volume. So you are drilling holes and spending more.
 

arturo7

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Holy pail wars, Batman!

Dry-wall-mud bucket?

Something new under the fermentation sun!
 

GOOCHY

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Who is buying HD buckets that have already had drywall mud in them?

They're brand new buckets, dude.
 

northernlad

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If you could determine that the Homer buckets were made from virgin HDPE then there would be absolutely nothing to worry about, dyed or not.
You might only be concerned if they were made from recycled HDPE in which case you could not know what may have been stored in the original plastic that may or may not cause problems.
And, from my own broken record: the 2 in the triangle is a recycling code that has nothing at all to do with determining a plastic's food safety.
If you want to be certain it is food safe it will either be verifiable virgin HDPE or have NSF2 (which would never be found on a Homer bucket) printed on it somewhere.
 

arturo7

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Mr Northo, although virgin material is important, the red colorant is also a factor.



Damn, I was trying not to get dragged in

...again...
 

89OctaneStang

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I used to use my Homer buckets for racking when I started out. But now I use them for sanitation buckets but have never had any problems.. But when racking, the beer was never in them for very long.
 

BeerCrazy

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Do you drill em and put in a spigot??? I have been wondering about em also. I have used drywall buckets to make wine with before (I do drywall so I have 100's of buckets), but in the last few years they have quit putting the rubber gasket in the lid,,,, thought of trying a lid from the brewhouse, just ain't got around to it, but the buckets I have been getting from the local shop, I have had to drill and put in a spgoit.
At least for beer, I wouldn't worry about the lack of gasket. But then again, I think an air lock is a luxury and have done just fine with tin foil.
 

Mista_Sparkle

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Sorry I wasnt clear, I'm saying that I can get an ale pail only for $9 but then I would need a lid w/grommet @ $4 so really I'll just break it down for my lhbs prices

Homer Bucket + lid + grommet + airlock ≈ $7
Ale Pail + lid w/grommet + airlock ≈15

so the homer bucket is quite a bit cheaper however theres that slight extra risk of cancer or something... but hey, it saves you $8
 
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Monkey

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So the comparison is $7 and a little bit of labor for a 5 gallon fermenter vs $9 and no labor for a 7 gallon fermenter?

Forgive me if I am underwhelmed at the value of the home depot bucket.
i can't find any ale pale buckets for under 25$. I think they might even be over $30, especially if you get it with a lid. The ones with spigots are more expensive as well.
Is there a website that sells them for $9 after shipping?

How did this conversation mutate into dry wall buckets? next we will somehow find ourselves debating a ferment inside of an old TV or something

"you can only use a 5-gallon toilet if it hasn't been crapped in" :off:
 

remilard

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i can't find any ale pale buckets for under 25$. I think they might even be over $30, especially if you get it with a lid. The ones with spigots are more expensive as well.
Is there a website that sells them for $9 after shipping?

How did this conversation mutate into dry wall buckets? next we will somehow find ourselves debating a ferment inside of an old TV or something

"you can only use a 5-gallon toilet if it hasn't been crapped in" :off:
Morebeer sells a 6 gallon food save rated bucket with a lid (drilled) for $10 with free shipping.
 

arturo7

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Problem Solved:

Lowes' offers their cheap 5 gallon bucket in gray. No problems with the red colorant.
 
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