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highest abv can get with dry yeast

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roder_60

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I've brewed about 7 batches thus far, some with dry yeast (usually muntons) and some with liquid strands. My results have generally been mixed which I attribute more to my inexperience than anything. As a result, I've been trying to concentrate more on cost effective recipes while I learn the tricks of the trade and so recently I've been brewing only with muntons dry yeast and frankly, the results have all been good. My question is, I'm looking to start dabbling in some new recipe ideas and want to try some higher gravity beers, will the muntons dry still work for say, a barleywine, an imperial stout, or even a mead? Is there generally a certain abv or gravity level where dry yeasts just can't survive/work? Any info greatly appreciated. Thanks.

matt
 

ohiobrewtus

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It depends how you define high gravity. If you're wanting to do 7-11% beers, then you can use a dry strain but you'll need to pitch 2 or 3 times the normal amount. If you're wanting 12%+ brews then you might be reaching the limits in which the yeast can function properly. Check with the manufacturer for specific details on the particular strain of yeast that you are using.

I used Nottingham on the IIPA that I did recently. I rehydrated 2 packs and it took it from 1.090 to 1.018 in 4 days.
 

solidghost

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higher alcohol content, try those wine yeast. they can handle higher alcohol content without dying.
 

batesjer

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solidghost said:
higher alcohol content, try those wine yeast. they can handle higher alcohol content without dying.
Uh, don't use wine yeast, unless you want to make wine . . . or Edwort's Apfelwein, which is wine.
 

uuurang

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FWIW...Safale us05 pumped out ~13% on a mead I just did.

That was after maxing out on yeast energizer/nutrient and aerating the crud outta the must.
 

david_42

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Munton's isn't suited for higher gravity ales. It that would leave you with very high final gravities. It is a low attenuation yeast best suited for extract with cane sugar recipes. Munton's Gold would do a better job, as would Nottingham or S-05.
 

brewt00l

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Southwood said:
I was going to use two packs of S-04 on an upcoming barleywine. Any thoughts?
What ABV are you looking to reach?

Liquid strains of Whitbread ale yeast poop out around 10% and I don't know what exactly 04's tollerance is. S33 is good to 11.5% per Fermentis' website.
 

srm775

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solidghost said:
higher alcohol content, try those wine yeast. they can handle higher alcohol content without dying.
This isn't good advice for making a higher ABV beer. As someone else mentioned, if you want to make wine, use wine yeast, if you want to make beer, use beer yeast. Otherwise, you beer won't have a very good flavor profile.

Look into using the belgian strains of Safeale, like T-58 and T33. While not quite as cheap as Munton's there's still very reasonable, will tolerate higher alcohol levels.
 

mew

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Southwood said:
I was going to use two packs of S-04 on an upcoming barleywine. Any thoughts?
Those english strains don't attenuate like the american strains. I'd go with S-05.
 

srm775

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MikeFlynn74 said:
Dude they are like 2$ a packet vs .99!
You're right, but White Labs and Wyeast are only $6 a pack. You'd be amazed at how cheap some people could be. Some people would just not spend the extra dollar if they didn't have to.
 
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srm775 said:
This isn't good advice for making a higher ABV beer. As someone else mentioned, if you want to make wine, use wine yeast, if you want to make beer, use beer yeast. Otherwise, you beer won't have a very good flavor profile.
Actually, the advice isn't complete. Use a beer yeast until it gives up. If the beer is still too sweet, and/or the alcohol content isn't where you want it, pitch some wine/champagne yeast to finish it up.
 

steve123

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We're about to be in this boat right now it seems, just did a blonde that we dumped somewhere around 6lbs of "candy" sugar into....roughly because we were kinda tired of it and had a mess to deal with. I took a OG came out to about 1.80 and according to my hyrdometer instructions +3 for the fact the worts was still at 80deg. So here's hoping our Kolsch yeast can get it most of the way, says up to 10%. If we need to we can pitch champagne to finish it off, though it should be close.
 

cheezydemon

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ANY yeast will reach higher abv tolerance if you do multiple step fermentation. I have had great success with this and have coaxed even dry yeast well beyond the advertised limit.
 
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