Quantcast

high temp for british bitter?

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

fihzy

New Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2005
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
I'm just brewing my first batch of ale: British Bitter. I started on Sunday, and as of today activity in the airlock is pretty infrequent. I'm not really sure what I should be looking for to be honest. Anyway, unfortunately the weather has been pretty warm here in Minnesota this week, and the coolest part of the house was only around 75-78F. What sort of impact might that have on the process? The instructions for the bitter had the maximum acceptable temperature at about 77F I think.

Thanks for any advice!
 

Dude

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 15, 2005
Messages
8,768
Reaction score
116
Location
Ramstein-Miesenbach
fihzy said:
I'm just brewing my first batch of ale: British Bitter. I started on Sunday, and as of today activity in the airlock is pretty infrequent. I'm not really sure what I should be looking for to be honest. Anyway, unfortunately the weather has been pretty warm here in Minnesota this week, and the coolest part of the house was only around 75-78F. What sort of impact might that have on the process? The instructions for the bitter had the maximum acceptable temperature at about 77F I think.

Thanks for any advice!

It probably is mostly done fermenting.
Without knowing the exact specs of the yeast you used, I'd say 75-78° is a little too high for OPTIMAL fermentation. However, I think worst case scenario the beer may have a little bit of a yeasty and fruity character. It will probably depend on your personal tastes. Some people like that.
I think you'll taste this beer and probably say its one of the best you've ever had! :D
 
OP
F

fihzy

New Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2005
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
ORRELSE said:
the beer may have a little bit of a yeasty and fruity character. It will probably depend on your personal tastes. Some people like that.
I think you'll taste this beer and probably say its one of the best you've ever had! :D
Well, I'm looking forward to trying it in any case. What's really funny is that in my many years of beer drinking I've been completely oblivious to the brewing process: then, after just brewing a single batch (that isn't even finished) I've already started to appreciate other beer more. With the first beer I drank after the brew day, I immediately recongised the strong hoppy flavour it had, which the label confirmed (to my surprise)
 

Dude

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 15, 2005
Messages
8,768
Reaction score
116
Location
Ramstein-Miesenbach
fihzy said:
Well, I'm looking forward to trying it in any case. What's really funny is that in my many years of beer drinking I've been completely oblivious to the brewing process: then, after just brewing a single batch (that isn't even finished) I've already started to appreciate other beer more. With the first beer I drank after the brew day, I immediately recongised the strong hoppy flavour it had, which the label confirmed (to my surprise)

I hear ya. I thought I knew alot about beer before I started this. Now I'm a freaking (self-proclaimed) expert. :D
 

Turricaine

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2005
Messages
205
Reaction score
1
Location
Leicester
I would try not to let it worry you. However I have had some Czech beers that did have yeasty flavors that went a bit overboard. However, living in the UK this haas never ocurred in my personal homebrews. Too low of a temperature has always been the downfall for me.
 
Top