Help with stc-1000 programming?

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Pelican521

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So I finally made time to wire up my stc-1000 temp controller last night and it seems like everything is in working order.

The only thing is, I don't know how to program it! I guess it was getting late, but the instructions didn't seem clear to me. Could anyone give me a quick lesson and also let me know what would be the best settings for a full size fridge.

I don't want to burn out my fridge with the compressor going on and off too frequently.

Thanks for your help!

image-477570914.jpg
 
What is your desired temperature? Is it for serving or as a fermentation fridge? Do you have it wired for heating and cooling?
 
Yep, it's wired for heating and cooling. I don't have anything to brew at the moment. I'm just trying to program it.

Say for example I want to have it set at 64 degrees?
 
There are 4 options on the STC-1000

F1 - Set temp
F2 - Differential
F3 - Compressor Delay
F4 - Calibration

Press and hold that S-button until you see F1 on the display. You then release the S-button and can use the up or down arrows to move from F1 through F4.

If you have F1 showing, HOLD the S button and while holding it (for me this takes two hands) press the up or down arrows to pick the temperature you want it set at. Once you have the set temp you want, release the S-button, and press the power button once to save it. If you forget to press the power button when you're done, the STC-1000 won't save your change.

In normal operations, the STC-1000 display will always show the actual temperature reading from the probe. The only way to know your set temp is to get into the settings like this.

[Edit 1] I just remembered you can make the STC-1000 show your set temp by just pressing the up or down button (I forget which) while it's in normal operation mode. You can't change the settings this way, but it will display the set temp for you.

F2 is the temperature differential, as I mentioned. Same deal. Press and hold the S button until F1 shows up. Release the S button, and press the up or down arrow to get to F2. Once you're on F2, HOLD the S-button again and press the up and down arrows to pick a differential. 0.5 or 1C is usually fine, but fine tune it to your system. If you have it set at 1.0, and the temperature of the liquid gets 1C over your set temp, the cooling plug will kick in. The reverse is true for heating.

F3 is the timer delay for engaging the cooling unit, and is to preserve the compressor of your chest freezer, fridge, AC unit, etc...

F4 is temperature calibration. Always test your temp probe with a known temperature, boiling water, freezing water, or something in between using another temp probe you trust to compare. If it's off, you can make adjustments.

Happy brewing!

[Edit 2] When you test the STC-1000 don't freak out if your cooling outlet doesn't power up right away. It will wait for the differential period before kicking on. If you're differential is set for 7 minutes, wait 7 minutes before you go ripping wires out! Like I did for 2 hours before I figured out why my cooling outlet wasn't working.
 
There are 4 options on the STC-1000

F1 - Set temp
F2 - Differential
F3 - Compressor Delay
F4 - Calibration

Press and hold that S-button until you see F1 on the display. You then release the S-button and can use the up or down arrows to move from F1 through F4.

If you have F1 showing, HOLD the S button and while holding it (for me this takes two hands) press the up or down arrows to pick the temperature you want it set at. Once you have the set temp you want, release the S-button, and press the power button once to save it. If you forget to press the power button when you're done, the STC-1000 won't save your change.

In normal operations, the STC-1000 display will always show the actual temperature reading from the probe. The only way to know your set temp is to get into the settings like this.

[edit] I just remembered you can make the STC-1000 show your set temp by just pressing the up or down button (I forget which) while it's in normal operation mode. You can't change the settings this way, but it will display the set temp for you.

F2 is the temperature differential, as I mentioned. Same deal. Press and hold the S button until F1 shows up. Release the S button, and press the up or down arrow to get to F2. Once you're on F2, HOLD the S-button again and press the up and down arrows to pick a differential. 0.5 or 1C is usually fine, but fine tune it to your system. If you have it set at 1.0, and the temperature of the liquid gets 1C over your set temp, the cooling plug will kick in. The reverse is true for heating.

F3 is the timer delay for engaging the cooling unit, and is to preserve the compressor of your chest freezer, fridge, AC unit, etc...

F4 is temperature calibration. Always test your temp probe with a known temperature, boiling water, freezing water, or something in between using another temp probe you trust to compare. If it's off, you can make adjustments.

Happy brewing!

Excellent explanation.

Right now, let's focus on F1 (temp setting). The defaults on F2 and F3 will be just fine for now.

The thing that's easy to forget (after you've pressed/held S, see the F1 and then press/hold S again while doing the up/down arrows to adjust temp) is to hit that power button again to tell the unit to accept your changes. I've got three of these things and I still occasionally forget that.

It helps to practice at first with it at your kitchen table with a lamp plugged into the cool outlet. Also, if you see the red light blinking and the lamp/fridge does not come on, it's in compressor protection mode. Just give it a few minutes and it will switch over to activate the outlet.

Welcome to the wonderful world of precise temp control and tastier brew.:rockin:
 
Make sure to have thermal load in there. Add a 5 gallon bucket of water or something. Without it your temps could be jumping to quickly.

I had 2 gallons in a 4.7 cu ft freezer and I had to add another gallon of liquid for the temps to steady.
 
Exactly! BigFloyd jumped in with his reminder right as I was typing Edit #2 from my post. I can't begin to tell you how frustrated I was removing wires, cutting new ones, etc... for hours... before I finally figured out why my cooling outlet wasn't getting power. Felt very silly afterward.
 
Thanks so much for the in-depth explanations guys! After I eat dinner (and the kids go to bed) I'll give it a try and see if I can get it to work!

Cheers!
 
There are 4 options on the STC-1000

F1 - Set temp
F2 - Differential
F3 - Compressor Delay
F4 - Calibration

Press and hold that S-button until you see F1 on the display. You then release the S-button and can use the up or down arrows to move from F1 through F4.

If you have F1 showing, HOLD the S button and while holding it (for me this takes two hands) press the up or down arrows to pick the temperature you want it set at. Once you have the set temp you want, release the S-button, and press the power button once to save it. If you forget to press the power button when you're done, the STC-1000 won't save your change.

In normal operations, the STC-1000 display will always show the actual temperature reading from the probe. The only way to know your set temp is to get into the settings like this.

[Edit 1] I just remembered you can make the STC-1000 show your set temp by just pressing the up or down button (I forget which) while it's in normal operation mode. You can't change the settings this way, but it will display the set temp for you.

F2 is the temperature differential, as I mentioned. Same deal. Press and hold the S button until F1 shows up. Release the S button, and press the up or down arrow to get to F2. Once you're on F2, HOLD the S-button again and press the up and down arrows to pick a differential. 0.5 or 1C is usually fine, but fine tune it to your system. If you have it set at 1.0, and the temperature of the liquid gets 1C over your set temp, the cooling plug will kick in. The reverse is true for heating.

F3 is the timer delay for engaging the cooling unit, and is to preserve the compressor of your chest freezer, fridge, AC unit, etc...

F4 is temperature calibration. Always test your temp probe with a known temperature, boiling water, freezing water, or something in between using another temp probe you trust to compare. If it's off, you can make adjustments.

Happy brewing!

[Edit 2] When you test the STC-1000 don't freak out if your cooling outlet doesn't power up right away. It will wait for the differential period before kicking on. If you're differential is set for 7 minutes, wait 7 minutes before you go ripping wires out! Like I did for 2 hours before I figured out why my cooling outlet wasn't working.


Thanks for this! Too bad they can't copy this and include it in the instructions because your explanation is WAY easier to understand than the instructions. I printed this and have it taped on the wall next to my Stc-1000!
 
Just ordered one of these bad boys, and am just commenting here to subscribe to this thread so i can find it easily when I'll need it in the future... Looks like a good tutorial - thanks!
 
I commend all of you who are pursuing this worthwhile endeavor. You will absolutely love what it does for your beer.

(As I sit here sipping a delightful maibock fermented at 48-50*F, D-rested at 61.5*F and cold lagered 6 weeks at 35*F thanks to the STC-1000)
 
So i just finished installing my stc1000 in my keezer and i am not sure if its wired properly.. i wired it with a heat and cool outlet but will not be using the heat. I plugged in the freezer to the cool side and tested the probe with boiling water.. seemed to be right. I put the temp setting at 8c. After turning on the freezer to test it it dropped down to temp quickly and then when it reached 8c it cut off and then turned on after the 5 minute delay. When it turned back on the heat indicator liht was on but it kept dropping down and went all the way to 1c. If i dont need to use the heat outlet should i just remove the wiring for it? Im not sure what to do..
 
What exactly do you have wired into it? I'm not using the heat side either and I just don't have anything connected to it. The light will still turn on when it surpasses the low side of my temp range, but it doesn't do anything.
 
I have it wired into the top portion of the outlet. The bottom outlet is where the freezer is plugged into. When I tested it last night it kept dropping all the way to 1C. I followed This thread. Maybe I have a bad controller?
 
Do you currently have anything in the freezer? A thermal load, bucket of water, may help to regulate the temp a little better. Mine does have a tendency to "overrun" the low set point on occasion.
 
So i just finished installing my stc1000 in my keezer and i am not sure if its wired properly.. i wired it with a heat and cool outlet but will not be using the heat. I plugged in the freezer to the cool side and tested the probe with boiling water.. seemed to be right. I put the temp setting at 8c. After turning on the freezer to test it it dropped down to temp quickly and then when it reached 8c it cut off and then turned on after the 5 minute delay. When it turned back on the heat indicator liht was on but it kept dropping down and went all the way to 1c. If i dont need to use the heat outlet should i just remove the wiring for it? Im not sure what to do..

I wonder, do you have your probe in water? You need something that is more stable and resistant to ambient temperatures. The air temp can keep falling as the cool air falls, etc. and is wildly unstable.

When you say it cut off when it reached set point, then came back on after the 5 min delay...I don't understand that. Do you mean the heat came on after a 5m delay? If you want to use heat without anything fancy, you can put a light bulb fixture in a paint can (clean, preferrably new paint can) to shield out the light but it will still heat. I just put a light fixture in there with a SS bowl over the top of it and a low wattage (25w) incandescent bulb. I found that heat was slightly necessary at times.
 
I currently dont have any kegs or carboys in the freezer. I did have the temp prode in water but nothing substantial, maybe like 1/2 gallon.. i do have gallon jugs i can use..
It seemed like to me that when it hit the 8c temp its set at it did cut off and then after the 3 minute delay its set at it cut back on and dropped to 1c.. it almost seemed like it was trying to use a heat sourse to heat up the probe, cause the heat light was on.
I just moved so i havnt been able move the kegs yet, if thats what you guys think it is i can put them in and retry it..
 
Is it possible you have the heat and cool wired to the same entire outlet? Ie. maybe the tab between the top and bottom recepticle are not broken, thus when heat comes on, it's powering the entire outlet including your fridge?
 
Here is a pic.. if you can kinda figure it out.I have the black from the extension cord split to # 2,5,7.. white from cord split to side of outlet, and #1.. green to ground on outlet..then wire from #8 to one side of the outlet, and a wire from #6 to side of outlet

Then i plug in the freezer to the right outlet.. the side of the one going to #8

ForumRunner_20130513_174607.png
 
Yes, if the tab isn't broken, then when EITHER of the green wires goes hot, the whole outlet is powered. Just break it on the green side. If you only have one white going to the other side, leave that tab in-tact.
 
I just want to make sure i do this correctly. When you say tab are you only refering to the little black plastic piece or do i have to break the actual metal tab piece..
 
Here is a pic.. if you can kinda figure it out.I have the black from the extension cord split to # 2,5,7.. white from cord split to side of outlet, and #1.. green to ground on outlet..then wire from #8 to one side of the outlet, and a wire from #6 to side of outlet

Then i plug in the freezer to the right outlet.. the side of the one going to #8

The bridge has to be broken on the side where the two "hot" wires are connected to the outlet. Otherwise, when the unit activates heat or cool, both outlets will energize. See this video-

The sensor needs to be either 1) taped to the side of a fermenter and insulated from surrounding air or 2) placed inside a jar of water w/ a hole punched in the lid for the wire. This will stabilize the temp readings.
 
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Ok, I broke the tab and turned it back on. When it started to cool it got down past the 8C setting again, it dropped down to 6.5, and then it kicked off and it went back up to 8C and is staying there. I think I just have to adjust the settings now. Thanks for the help.
 
Settings and thermal load in the keezer are key. If you submerge the probe you will get a slower temperature swing. You can also be lazy like myself and tape it to the outside of your fermenter and insulate the outside with a towel or such.
 
You can also be lazy like myself and tape it to the outside of your fermenter and insulate the outside with a towel or such.

That's not being lazy.

I want to know as best I can what the fermenter temp is rather than the temp of a separate jar of water sitting in the fridge. I've measured as much as a 7*F difference between the side of the fermenter and the surrounding air.
 
That's not being lazy.

I want to know as best I can what the fermenter temp is rather than the temp of a separate jar of water sitting in the fridge. I've measured as much as a 7*F difference between the side of the fermenter and the surrounding air.

Well lazy and cheap compared to the best way to test ferm temps and use a thermowell type probe into the fermenter.
 
I bungee my probe to the side of my FV underneath a chunk of styrofoam. Has worked well for 6 months or so now.

+1 on this. I use a thawed feezer pack to insulate. One that came with yeast from AHS. Tried duct tape but bungee works far better.
 
I have the probe in one of these (minus the thermometer, of course):
4778337.jpg


The temperature usually stays +/- the set range so I can't complain. And small fluctuations will not affect a 5gal batch that quickly.
 
You want the probe touching the FV, otherwise your just controlling ambient temps. The beer could be as much as 10* hotter, and that could put it into the off-flavor range. While affixing it to the side isn't 100% exact, it's closer than a container of liquid that isn't affected by changes in beer temp whatsoever.

Of course, if this is for a keg fridge or keezer, then fine, put it in a container of water.
 
You want the probe touching the FV, otherwise your just controlling ambient temps. The beer could be as much as 10* hotter, and that could put it into the off-flavor range. While affixing it to the side isn't 100% exact, it's closer than a container of liquid that isn't affected by changes in beer temp whatsoever.

Of course, if this is for a keg fridge or keezer, then fine, put it in a container of water.

Yeah you are right. This will be important for the first few days. I will put the probe into my next batch. I've had good experience so far but that doesn't mean it can't be improved! :rockin:
 
I've got mine controlling a freezer. I've put it in there just testing things out and noticed that when the freezer kicks on , it goes way below my low set point. It's just hanging in the air right now.

for example I've got 18.2C at set point, and +/- 2C for the change temp (so 61 F - 68 F). I've got a 10 minute delay. Without ever opening the door, it goes up to 20.2C, then the freezer kicks on. At which point it goes to like 15 C and takes forever to come back up to temp.

Should I just tape it to my glass thermometer?
 
I've got mine controlling a freezer. I've put it in there just testing things out and noticed that when the freezer kicks on , it goes way below my low set point. It's just hanging in the air right now.

for example I've got 18.2C at set point, and +/- 2C for the change temp (so 61 F - 68 F). I've got a 10 minute delay. Without ever opening the door, it goes up to 20.2C, then the freezer kicks on. At which point it goes to like 15 C and takes forever to come back up to temp.

Should I just tape it to my glass thermometer?

Is the freezer compressor actually running the whole way down to 15c or does it cut off at 18.2 but the temp keeps dropping after that? The latter is common using air temp as an indicator. Try placing the probe in a jar of water and see what happens.
 
Yeah you got it. The compressor shuts off but temp keeps going down. Doing my first temp controlled batch and I taped the probe to the side of carboy and that seemed to fix the problem of going too low on the temp. Holding steady at like 19 C. Thanks for the suggestions.
 
Yeah you got it. The compressor shuts off but temp keeps going down. Doing my first temp controlled batch and I taped the probe to the side of carboy and that seemed to fix the problem of going too low on the temp. Holding steady at like 19 C. Thanks for the suggestions.

Yeah, that's the best way I've found. Directly in the wort can cause issues, too, because the compressor kicks off when the center of the wort is finally cooled, but the ambient and edges are cooler, and can continue to drive down the temp of the wort. I think taping/strapping to the side gives a good mix of ambient and beer, to accommodate for lag.
 
unless your using a thermo well to submerge the probe in your actual fermenter you are not getting an accurate reading on the temp of your brew and could be getting unwanted results from your yeast not being in the tight tolerance you thought you had it at. With that being said it just comes down to how much control you really want. Personally I want ALL the control.
 
unless your using a thermo well to submerge the probe in your actual fermenter you are not getting an accurate reading on the temp of your brew and could be getting unwanted results from your yeast not being in the tight tolerance you thought you had it at. With that being said it just comes down to how much control you really want. Personally I want ALL the control.

Single thermowell is not accurate either. It only monitors the inner-most beer temp, even though the outermost is what's more quickly affected by ambient temp changes. Now, if you have glycol coils in your beer, then I'll buy that the thermowell is more indicative of the entire volume's temperature. Otherwise you'll be over-cooling/warming the outermost wort in order for the innermost to finally reach the desired temp.

Inverse is true about monitoring outermost wort temp, too.
 
unless your using a thermo well to submerge the probe in your actual fermenter you are not getting an accurate reading on the temp of your brew and could be getting unwanted results from your yeast not being in the tight tolerance you thought you had it at. With that being said it just comes down to how much control you really want. Personally I want ALL the control.

I'm into control and precision as well (that's why I built a PID controlled E-BIAB rig). However, the folks who have measured in both places (middle with thermowell and taped/insulated on the outside of the fermenter) simultaneously report that they see a very small (about 1*F) difference in temp between the two locations during the most active phase of fermentation.

Since fermentation is going on within the entire space of the fermenter, it appears that it's occurring within that narrow 1*F range with it happening just slightly warmer in the middle compared to around the sides (where there is actually quite a lot of the volume).

In the final analysis, measuring at the side of the fermenter, if securely attached and well-insulated from the ambient air, gives you a very useable, accurate reading without having to stick a thermowell down into your beer. I'm comfortable with that.
 

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