Help with hops.

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Enpitsu

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Just sampled my attempt at a belgian dubbel. When tasting, at the beginning there is the perfect hop flavor and amount that I want. HOWEVER! the beer finishes with too much of a hop flavor.

My question is, where does the finishing hop flavor come from? The bittering hops? aroma hops? from leaving them in the fermenter?

Here was my hop profile:

1 oz Styrian Goldings (4.2) @ 60 min
0.75 oz Hallertau (3.8) @ 30 min
0.25 oz Hallertau (3.8) @ 5 min
Total: ~30 IBU

The hops stayed with the brew through the fermentation (21 days in primary) and were filtered out at bottling.
 

OLDBREW

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bittering comes from the longest boiled additions and starts degrading from there.

At around 30 minutes left in the boil the flavoring additions are added and can go down towards 15 min. additions

Aroma hop additions are best done closer to flameout. 10 mins down to flameout and dry hopping will give you the most aroma.

this is just a ballpark scheme, these times will overlap adding bitterness to flavor and flavor to aroma
 
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Enpitsu

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Thanks, OldBrew. But i'm wondering...why does that heavy hop flavor come later in the taste rather than earlier in the taste? Or why doesn't it have the same profile throughout the taste?

I'm curious why it finishes so hoppy but doesn't start out that way.
 

cuinrearview

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I suspect you are experiencing another flavor and calling it "hoppy". Those hops are all very very mild and in a yeast driven beer such as a dubbel I doubt they could be picked out. Those belgian yeasts throw some mad-crazy flavors. You didn't mention the yeast or the rest of your recipe or your process, ferm. temp., when you "sampled", etc. All of those things are important and would help with trying to answer your question. If your first sample was a week after bottling day after a three week fermentation on a 7% Dubbel you may just be tasing a green beer. More information is needed here along with a better description of the "hoppy" flavor. A perception of bitterness on the back of the tongue in the aftertaste could be astringency from a bad mash PH or over-sparging. All of the information from this batch is probably needed to help you.
 

944play

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I totally agree with Mr. View. A dubbel with an appropriate amount of age on it should have no distinctly identifiable hop character, just some balancing bitterness. OP is almost certainly tasting green beer or confusing hop flavor with yeast-derived esters. Hop bill looks to be ideal for style.

Taste it again in three weeks. It will probably peak about four months after that!
 
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Enpitsu

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you guys are pretty spot on, here, i think! it was in fact 9 days after bottling that i sampled it. the yeast was white labs trappist yeast.

i have no patience and can never seem to wait, but i'll hold out for a number of more weeks.

also, the more i thought about it, it was (unfortunately) a low mash temp, so it was kind of dry. i'm thinking since its mostly dry plus given what you guys said about the green beer, that there is not as much sweetness to hide the green.

thanks again! let the waiting begin...
 
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