HELP - Need info on keg coolers

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

Lane

Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
I need to find a keg cooler ASAP. We're remodeling and the cabinet guy needs dimensions. I want to cool two of the pop type kegs - about 8 inches diameter, 26 inches high, I understand. We'll run lines out of it to some remote taps... I need to find a cooler that will handle them and not break the bank... where do I find them?

Thanks
 

Flyin' Lion

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2005
Messages
1,952
Reaction score
22
Location
Chester, VA
Check craigslist for a sanyo 4912. That is the popular model for homebrewers. It can be purchased new for between 170 and 200 dollars.

Be careful of used SMALL fridges, you want one that does not have freezer.

Hope that helps.
 
OP
L

Lane

Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
I"m checking them out.. .thanks! Will they hold 2 of the 5 gallon pop type kegs?
 
OP
L

Lane

Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
(Ten Chars.) ???

Any advice on how to drill it? I'm not putting in a tower, I want to run lines out of it to go to two remote taps, about 3 - 4 feet away.

Thanks for the help!
 

TheJadedDog

AFK ATM
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
3,310
Reaction score
17
Location
People's Republic of Cambridge
Lane said:
(Ten Chars.) ???

Any advice on how to drill it? I'm not putting in a tower, I want to run lines out of it to go to two remote taps, about 3 - 4 feet away.

Thanks for the help!
Run a search on sanyo 4912 and you will get a wealth of information on how to convert. Most of the threads are about installing a draft tower, but you should be able to find what you are looking for.
 

chillHayze

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
1,593
Reaction score
18
Location
Western PA
Yeah the 4912 for sure. Love mine!

If you are running uncooled tap lines for pretty much any distance then expect sacrificing much beer in the way of warm foam.
 
OP
L

Lane

Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
Thanks! I'll do a search.

About the lines - how long is too far and how does one go about cooling the lines?
 

chillHayze

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
1,593
Reaction score
18
Location
Western PA
Lane said:
Thanks! I'll do a search.

About the lines - how long is too far and how does one go about cooling the lines?
Reallistically speaking just a few inches exposed to room temp will make the first glass all foam and subsequent glasses foam somewhat. Not to mention they will be warmer. Depends of how fast you are pulling pints from it, but every glass will be effected.

Notice at a bar when they fill up like half a pitcher from a tap that has been sitting for a while? That is because they often run lines from another room or basement and that run of line really warms the beer.

The best solution would be to run the beer line inside a PVC pipe with insulation around the PVC pipe. Seal the PVC pipe to the kegerator internally so as to make the fridge cool it. Also would need to establish a pressure difference across the pipe to ensure cool airflow. That would be the most expensive bot initially and long term due to the compresser running more frequently.

A passive solution would be to simply insulate the beer line someway, be it in a PVC pipe, wrapped in foam pipe insulation, or shrouded with Great Stuff Foam INSIDE a 2" drain pipe.

It all depends on how long of a run you have, your time, and your budget.

Cheers!
 
OP
L

Lane

Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
Thanks... this is a big help. I need to run about 4 feet away. I'm thinking of some kind of flex duct, like dryer vent - putting a computer fan in to move air into it and a tube inside to allow air to flow back to the fridge.... reasonable?
 

chillHayze

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
1,593
Reaction score
18
Location
Western PA
Lane said:
Thanks... this is a big help. I need to run about 4 feet away. I'm thinking of some kind of flex duct, like dryer vent - putting a computer fan in to move air into it and a tube inside to allow air to flow back to the fridge.... reasonable?
Dryer vent is not a great insulator. I'd recommend a pvc pipe/insulation with a smaller diameter. Might not need a fan with a smaller diameter insulator anyway.
 
OP
L

Lane

Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
Well.. I was going to insulate the dryer vent - but I see your point. How would the cold air get into the PVC? How big a pipe do you mean?

Thanks
 

chillHayze

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
1,593
Reaction score
18
Location
Western PA
Lane said:
Well.. I was going to insulate the dryer vent - but I see your point. How would the cold air get into the PVC? How big a pipe do you mean?

Thanks
A good passive combo would be pipe insulation with the pvc pipe around it. If you made an active 4ft extention using the refridgerator it would cost quite a bit in electricity, but the first pint would have less foam.
As far as the dimentions, you would need the minimun ID of insulation to fit over your beer line, and PVC pipe to snugly fit over the insulation. I would measure my beer line for you, but it is in storage with the rest of my brewing stuff.
 

mrkeeg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2005
Messages
224
Reaction score
1
Location
Sundre, AB
If you are thinking that a flexible corridor would make things easier, you can get a dryer-vent-sized flexible pipe that is insulated... i think it is for cold air / burn air intake for your furnace .... I just looked in my utility room and mine is brand-named "flexmaster" 5in. Looks like it is basically a heavy duty dryer vent, wrapped in fiberglass batting, all sheethed in a plastic bag. 5" is the ID, it is about 7.5" OD.

As pointed out by Chillhayze, the extra space (and measly 1" insulation) would make your fridge work harder, but it would also provide lots of room for the air circulation neccessary to cool your lines for that distance.

Hmmm. In fact, maybe you run an extra tube... say, 3" diameter, inside the flexmaster tube. Your beer lines go through the inner tube, and the inner tube is also fitted with a computer fan or two forcing air up it. The cold air then flows with the beer lines up the inner tube, cycles out the top (near the taps), and returns in the outer sheath (between the 3" tube and the 5" flexmaster tube).

Just a bit of brainstorming... but now that I think about it... Iactually kind of like the tube-in-tube idea for air circ.

Keegan
 
OP
L

Lane

Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
I was thinking much the same thing.... maybe using my spare blow out tube for the inner one. I haven't figured out a way to connect a fan to blow the cold air in there though - maybe reverse things and put the beer lines in the bigger flexmaster pipe and have the fan connected to it - then put the blow out tube inside and let it return the cold air back to the fridge.... or something...
 
Top