help making blackberry wine

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disschord

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Hi the wild blackberrys around my way have started to ripen and im thinking of making some wine with them.
I have made cider once before with local apples and i've made larger from a kit.
But i have never made wine.

So dose anyone have a recipe and method for blackberry wine?
And any links for basic wine making would be great?
 

pen25

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now that black berrys are in season i will have to try this out. theres a pick your own farm near so ill go hit the place. too bad theres not that many wild brambles around like in norcal. oh how i miss black berry cobler
 

toddrod

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Here is a very good country type sweet wine recipe.

16 lbs Blackberries
12 lbs sugar
juice of 3 lemons
water to make 10 gallons
yeast - the older gentleman that gave me this recipe uses regular bread yeast and does not have to resweeten after fermentation. Use what ever type you want.

I have drank plenty of this wine and really enjoy it, but then again, I like sweet wines.
 
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ronaldino

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These people have no idea what they are talking about.

Pectic enzyme will help break down the fruit so the yeast will be able to get at the sugars easier. As long as your fruit is broken down by hand (squeezing it), you can omit pectic enzyme. Pectic enzyme has nothing to do with the clarity of the wine, clarity can be produced by filtering the wine or just by being patient and letting the wine clear over time.

And relying on natural yeast in the air is a good way to destroy your wine and make vinegar. Making wine relies on anaerobic reactions, so letting the reaction sit out uncovered will make vinegar. Adding yeast to wine is how 99.9% of wines are made, whether at home or at a vineyard, and has nothing to do with added preservatives.

Click here.
 

Yooper

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These people have no idea what they are talking about.

Pectic enzyme will help break down the fruit so the yeast will be able to get at the sugars easier. As long as your fruit is broken down by hand (squeezing it), you can omit pectic enzyme. Pectic enzyme has nothing to do with the clarity of the wine, clarity can be produced by filtering the wine or just by being patient and letting the wine clear over time.

And relying on natural yeast in the air is a good way to destroy your wine and make vinegar. Making wine relies on anaerobic reactions, so letting the reaction sit out uncovered will make vinegar. Adding yeast to wine is how 99.9% of wines are made, whether at home or at a vineyard, and has nothing to do with added preservatives.
Well, I still will continue to use pectic enzyme to reduce pectin haze, regardless. (Believe it or not, I know a little more about chemistry and wine making than you might think).

You're not exactly right about vinegar either- I do NOT use naturally yeast, but yeast don't make vinegar. Acetero bacter do. Winemaking doesn't necessarily need to be anaerobic- but acetero bacter work in aerobic environments, so you airlock your wine to prevent acetero bacter infection as well as prevent it from oxidation.

Insulting other members isn't really way to get people to click the link on your spam, either. (removed)
 

summersolstice

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As with Yooper, I too will continue using pectic enzyme to help clear the haze in my fruit wines, as well as to aid in breaking down the fruit.

Jack Keller is considered by many to be the preeminent authority on home winemaking, especially country wines. Jack is to home winemaking what Charlie Papazian is to home brewing. This is what Jack has to say about pectic enzyme:

"...I suppose it is possible to use too much pectic enzyme, but I can't think of a time I ever have (including the time I used 7 teaspoons making a gallon of carob wine). It not only attacks cellular structure... but neutralizes free pectins that can cause clarity problems. I will often add a half-teaspoon to a wine with just a slight smokiness -- not even a haze -- to it and find it brilliantly clear 2-4 days later."
 

gratus fermentatio

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I'm with Yooper & Summer on the pectic enzyme... I use it, it works; and I shall continue to use it. Regards, GF. :)
 
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wasten

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These people have no idea what they are talking about.

Pectic enzyme will help break down the fruit so the yeast will be able to get at the sugars easier. As long as your fruit is broken down by hand (squeezing it), you can omit pectic enzyme. Pectic enzyme has nothing to do with the clarity of the wine, clarity can be produced by filtering the wine or just by being patient and letting the wine clear over time.

And relying on natural yeast in the air is a good way to destroy your wine and make vinegar. Making wine relies on anaerobic reactions, so letting the reaction sit out uncovered will make vinegar. Adding yeast to wine is how 99.9% of wines are made, whether at home or at a vineyard, and has nothing to do with added preservatives.
 

EvilTOJ

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wow wasten, or should I say RONALDINO *dramatically removes his mask* we never would have thought it was you! I mean, after all, you got your ass banned, reregistered, then posted the exact same post that got you canned.

You might have gotten away with it too, if it weren't for those rotten kids and that dog.
 

Madbrewer

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You will notice that I added a blackberry melomel recipe yesterday that has won me awards and a gold at the fair before. It is a really inclusive recipe so it leaves nothing to chance. :mug: look in the recipe list on this site.
 
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