Help I think I ruined my batch of red ale

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Atticus570

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First off I'd like to say hello this is my first post and my first batch brewing I brewed the true brew red ale kit and I made a big mistake after adding my extract I boild the wort for an hour and not a half hour like the directions say I misread I so I added the first half of hops at the start and the last half during the last 3 minutes .I seemed to have done everything else correct but it has now bed almost 24hours and I have not noticed any action in the fermentator yet at lease since I left for work in the morning should I be worried?
 

helibrewer

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The boil time is not a problem. Don't worry about fermentation starting, it can take up to 36 hours depending on yeast strain, temperature, etc.
 

gelatin

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Your beer will be slightly more bitter than it would have otherwise been, but should still be quite drinkable.
 

homebrewdad

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Odds are that the only thing that is changed is that the beer is darker due to the time the extract boiled.
 

causeimthesquid

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RDWHAHB

You may have just made a Red IPA. If you were sanitary with the rest of your procedures following the boil, everything will be fine.
 
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Atticus570

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Thanks guys for the quick response I was really worried how long should I wait for the fermenting to start before I worry I brewed put it in the carboy right around 12pm sunday
 

Channel66

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You shouldn't worry at all as long as you cooled the wort to pitching temps before adding your yeast you will be fine. What exactly do you consider signs of fermentation?
 
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Atticus570

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To be honest just signs of foaming or bubbling mine has jsust been very still looking so far at least as of this morning I did cool the wort to 80 degrees f and rehydrated the yeast and in about the same temp water
 
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Atticus570

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Ok so it's been over 24 hours and its still just a steady body no movement inside the carboy of anything no bubbles no foam I know I'm new to this but I'm starting to get worried I'm going to take a gravity reading when I get home and see what it reads but I'm not sure if that's gonna be off because I boiled to long I feel like my first batch might be a loss lol but I'm still hoping it survives
 

Channel66

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Take your gravity reading. Compare it with your original reading. If it's lower than the original it's fermenting and you should leave it alone, if not I would say repitch the same yeast you pitched before .
 

gelatin

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Stop thinking about boiling too long as an issue that would effect fermentation, it just isn't related. If you boiled for 10 hours, maybe you might start having to worry because you boiled all the water off and caramelized everything. You boiled for one hour which will 100% not effect the fermentability in any significant way.
 

stpug

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The more you mess with cooled wort the greater the chance of infection (i.e. don't mess with it unless you HAVE to). Keep the lid on your vessel, and give it 48 hours from pitching time. Make sure the wort is sitting at around 70*F until you start seeing activity, then you'll need to move it to a lower temperature. At 48 hours, if it's still perfectly still, then sprinkle a dry packet of yeast (safale us05 or similar) over top and swirl it in. Keep at 70 until signs of activity and then reduce temp.

Oh yeah, and relax :D
 
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Atticus570

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So I came and saw the a few bubbles in the airlock but I barley touched the carboy and they stopped and I haven't noticed any diffrence yet in the way the beer looks just dark and still. If I don't see any thing by Wednesday do you think I should pitch more yeast that would be over 72 hours I'm at about 34 hours now
 

dozer5454

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Is there any sediment on the bottom of the carboy? If there is you may be able to GENTLY swirl the yeast back into suspension rather than opening it. Barring that you may need to rehydrate some dry yeast and pitch it. Just watch your fermentation temps and make sure the carboy doesn't blow off the air lock (don't ask). As a note for your next brew, try and get the temp down to the low 70's/high 60's before pitching your yeast.
 

hinkle

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I'm only on my second batch, but my first was an Irish Red Ale and I added the yeast to ~100F water for awhile before pitching it maybe 30-40 mins, per the instructions on the yeast packet, ignoring the directions from the local brew shop, and the second day or night I had a HUGE explosion and the krausen/foam boiled out of the air lock. That made me worried, so I was at the other end of the spectrum.

Either way, I let is sit and ferment with a new clean air lock, bottled it, and will be tasting it next weekend.

My only question is that you did pitch the yeast.
 

BansheeRider

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What are your fermentation temps? Anything in the low 60s would slow the process down.
 
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Atticus570

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Thanks I looked this morning and I didn't see any sediment I do believe it may be tempature related as my house seems have a heating problem this week of all weeks it seems to teeter from 60-67ish maybe that's what's slowing it down but now I'm on 48 hours I'm gonna buy a pack of yeast today and if nothing is happens when I get home from work tomorrow ill pitch more yeast
 

stpug

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If nothing else, I think you've got a couple ideas for names for this beer:

Ruined Red Ale
Repitch Red Ale
:D
 

BansheeRider

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Thanks I looked this morning and I didn't see any sediment I do believe it may be tempature related as my house seems have a heating problem this week of all weeks it seems to teeter from 60-67ish maybe that's what's slowing it down but now I'm on 48 hours I'm gonna buy a pack of yeast today and if nothing is happens when I get home from work tomorrow ill pitch more yeast
If you pitch more yeast try rehydrating the yeast first. That's if you're going with dry yeast.
 

Haussenbrau

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First off I'd like to say hello this is my first post and my first batch brewing I brewed the true brew red ale kit and I made a big mistake after adding my extract I boild the wort for an hour and not a half hour like the directions say I misread I so I added the first half of hops at the start and the last half during the last 3 minutes .I seemed to have done everything else correct but it has now bed almost 24hours and I have not noticed any action in the fermentator yet at lease since I left for work in the morning should I be worried?

What yeast did you pitch and how did you prepare the yeast?
What was the wort pitching temperature?
What temperature around the fermentor.
Nothing you describe would cause any fermenting problems.
It may cause some kettle carmelization, which is appropriate if you are making an Irish Red.
 
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Atticus570

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I used mutons dry yeast I boiled water let cool to about 75 f the. Used that to rehydrate it the wort was 80f and is in a room that is usually around 65 but may be cool when I'm not home
 
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Atticus570

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So I ended up pitching more yeast and boy did that work lots of activity now but not really any bubbles in the airlock but I'm not as worried about that after reading this forum I see my yeast swimming around all over now
 
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