Help! Hallertauer VS Hallertauer Magnum

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Panderson1

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Trying to brew Ocktoberfest (mashing now)...

So i screwed up and ordered Hallertauer MAGNUM instead of just Hallertau

One is low alpha (around 4%) and the one i ordered is 16%

I don't have regular Hallertau that's supposed to be 4% alpha acid. Only the magnumn.at 16%

So should i use less?

Will this work lol?

10 gal batch.

Plan was 2oz at 60 and 1oz at 20. But with regular hallertaur (i dont have that). Only have hallertaur MAGNUM.

Hope that makes sense
 
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DBhomebrew

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HBUs...

Weight x AA% = Weight x AA%

2oz x 4 = ?oz x 16

8 = ? X 16

8/16 = ?

1/2oz for your 60m

It won't be the same beer, but the bitterness will be close.
 

Miraculix

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Just for the record, there is no hop that is called Hallertau. Hallertau is the growing region.

I don't know why us shops keep mislabeling hallertau mittelfrüh as "hallertau", but that's usually what you get when you buy "hallertau".

It's a great hop, but this naming thing grinds my gears. :D
 

monkeymath

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Just for the record, there is no hop that is called Hallertau. Hallertau is the growing region.

I don't know why us shops keep mislabeling hallertau mittelfrüh as "hallertau", but that's usually what you get when you buy "hallertau".

It's a great hop, but this naming thing grinds my gears. :D

It is a somewhat confusing situation, so I'll try and elaborate a bit on this point. At least in Germany, hops are typically labeled as $origin $variety and often regions have their own (landrace) variety which often carries the same name.

So Tettnang, Spalt, Hersbruck, Hallertau are all areas where a hop is grown, and to confuse matters, there are varieties named Tettnanger, Spalter, Hersbrucker Spät and Hallertauer Mittelfrüh. Note that "spät" simply means "late" and "Mittelfrüh" is "semi-early", both referring to the respective time of harvest.

So a Cascade grown in Tettnang would be sold as "Tettnanger Cascade". I've read that Eric Toft, brewer at the Landbrauerei Schönram, praises a Tettnang-grown Spalter Select, which would then be called "Tettnanger Spalter Select". A Tettnanger (variety) grown in Spalt, on the other hand, would be "Spalter Tettnanger".

If a hop is just labeled "Tettnanger", then I'd expect it to be a "Tettnanger Tettnanger", but I suppose it could just be a Tettnanger variety grown anywhere. "Hallertauer", on the other hand, is by itself not even the name of a variety, and I think you wouldn't find that as a label in Germany.
 

Miraculix

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It is a somewhat confusing situation, so I'll try and elaborate a bit on this point. At least in Germany, hops are typically labeled as $origin $variety and often regions have their own (landrace) variety which often carries the same name.

So Tettnang, Spalt, Hersbruck, Hallertau are all areas where a hop is grown, and to confuse matters, there are varieties named Tettnanger, Spalter, Hersbrucker Spät and Hallertauer Mittelfrüh. Note that "spät" simply means "late" and "Mittelfrüh" is "semi-early", both referring to the respective time of harvest.
Yes, that further complicates things, that is true. But it is actually not that complicated.

See the capital M in Mittelfrüh? That capital M makes this a name. So it is not an adjective describing a timing but a specific name. An adjective would be written with a small m. Same for Spät and so on. They might have chosen the naming in reference to harvest time, but it is still a specific name pointing to a specific variety.
 
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