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mcmeador

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I am hoping someone on here knows where I can find a 3/8” female (FIP) to 1/4” push-in tube fitting so that I can hook my Steam Slayer up to my sink. I have attached pictures of the 3/4” fitting provided with the Steam Slayer. I have a “fancy” kitchen sink with a pull down sprayer head, so the only fitting I have to attach to is a 3/8” male on the hose. I’m hoping there’s a 3/8” version of the Steam Slayer connector out there somewhere.

I tried a 3/8” female to 3/4” male adapter, but it didn’t fit securely on the hose and water flowed backwards out of the fitting. I also tried to create my own adapter by connecting a 3/8” female to barb connector to a short piece of clear hose and then a barb to 3/4” male fitting on the other end, but there was too much pressure in the hose and the hose ripped open when I attempted to use it on my last brew day.

Finally I tried the inline fitting that Brew Hardware provides for the water shutoff valve, but my shutoff valve is positioned against the inside wall of my cabinet with the water line to the sink running through the cabinet wall into the next cabinet over. I struggled to squeeze this fitting in between the valve and the wall but had no luck.

The only other thing I know to do is try to find a 3/8” female to 1/4” push-in tube connector, and so far I am coming up with nothing. Anyone know where I might find one or have any other ingenious ideas for making this work for me so I can start using the Steam Slayer? Thanks in advance!
 

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One idea I just had if there is no fitting like I’m looking for is to try my rigged up adapter again but this time use tubing that has a lot thicker outer diameter like CO2 hose. The last one I used that ripped open was pretty flimsy hose, so CO2 hose should hold up.
 

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I can find a 3/8” female to 1/4” push-in tube fitting so that I can hook my Steam Slayer up to my sink
3/8” female what? If you mean 3/8” female compression, this might be it...
 
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I hadn't considered the yeasts tendency to warm things up. Still, the inkbird itself, should kick on to cool it down if it is set to cool. Maybe I'm missing something here. To my knowledge, it should turn on the fridge or whatever if the temp gets too high for any reason.
3/8” female what? If you mean 3/8” female compression, this might be it...
A standard 3/8” female (FIP). Same as what I pictured from Brew Hardware except I need the female end to be 3/8” instead of 3/4”.
 

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I can't see anywhere that combination is offered in a single fitting. Might have to get creative and scab it together a little bit. Maybe these 2 items together?
 

day_trippr

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Maybe this will work?


If that's not the right part, give freshwatersystems.com's fitting finder a try. I've yet to not find what I need buried in their tables...

Cheers!
 

Mtrhdltd

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The fitting in your picture is MHT or male hose thread (garden hose). For fip adaptor you should be fine with compression fitting on your 1/4 hose instead of push in, found at your local hardware store.

ETA:
Such as this.
 

camonick

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The fitting in your picture is MHT or male hose thread (garden hose). For fip adaptor you should be fine with compression fitting on your 1/4 hose instead of push in, found at your local hardware store.

ETA:
Such as this.
I thought about that option too, except I just assumed by the original question the OP wanted a push to connect for the tubing.
One of these will be needed for the plastic tubing for best results.
 
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I can't see anywhere that combination is offered in a single fitting. Might have to get creative and scab it together a little bit. Maybe these 2 items together?
Now there’s an idea. Hadn’t even considered a coupler. I’m not too familiar with plumbing parts
That makes a lot of sense. I may give that a try! Thanks!

Maybe this will work?


If that's not the right part, give freshwatersystems.com's fitting finder a try. I've yet to not find what I need buried in their tables...

Cheers!
I don’t think that will work since it’s BSPP and not NPT, but I will definitely browse through their site. Thanks for the recommendation

The fitting in your picture is MHT or male hose thread (garden hose). For fip adaptor you should be fine with compression fitting on your 1/4 hose instead of push in, found at your local hardware store.

ETA:
Such as this.
The fitting in my picture attaches to a male thread, but the fitting is female. Not sure how the fitting you linked to would work. How would the 1/4” hose secure into the fitting?
 
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I thought about that option too, except I just assumed by the original question the OP wanted a push to connect for the tubing.
One of these will be needed for the plastic tubing for best results.
Ok, that makes sense. Looks like I have some good options here that I wouldn’t have figured out on my own. Thanks!
 

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Not sure how the fitting you linked to would work. How would the 1/4” hose secure into the fitting?
That's a compression fitting that will work great for your application, except it's more permanent and won't swivel. You'd also need the extra part I linked above for best results with that option.
 

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I don’t think that will work since it’s BSPP and not NPT, but I will definitely browse through their site. Thanks for the recommendation
You can basically think of BSPP as straight and NPT as slightly tapered. And if you're talking sink hose parts there's a good chance it's a straight thread (because it relies on a gasket to seal as opposed to the fitting itself simply getting tight). In short, that may very well be the right fitting.
 

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How would the 1/4” hose secure into the fitting?
Here is a picture of how to assemble the compression fitting. I also just learned while I was searching that you should use a plastic ferrule (not the brass one shown above) on plastic tubing.
H6pCQ.jpg


 

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I have a “fancy” kitchen sink with a pull down sprayer head, so the only fitting I have to attach to is a 3/8” male on the hose.
Can you show us a picture of the connection you're trying to attach to? To be sure it is indeed 3/8" pipe thread.
 

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Here is a picture of how to assemble the compression fitting. I also just learned while I was searching that you should use a plastic ferrule (not the brass one shown above) on plastic tubing.
View attachment 707921

This is absolutely correct!
Both NPT and FIP have been referenced, one is tapered the other straight, they are not interchangeable. My guess from the sink reference is FIP, but verify your fitting type.
 

Mtrhdltd

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Here is a pic of my setup to the filter under my sink if it helps.
20201125_215204.jpg
 
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You can basically think of BSPP as straight and NPT as slightly tapered. And if you're talking sink hose parts there's a good chance it's a straight thread (because it relies on a gasket to seal as opposed to the fitting itself simply getting tight). In short, that may very well be the right fitting.
Thanks for clarifying. That may be the easiest thing to try first.

Can you show us a picture of the connection you're trying to attach to? To be sure it is indeed 3/8" pipe thread.
Picture attached. I use a 3/8” FIP to 3/8” hose barb connector on this for my wort chiller, so I know that’s correct.

This is absolutely correct!
Both NPT and FIP have been referenced, one is tapered the other straight, they are not interchangeable. My guess from the sink reference is FIP, but verify your fitting type.
Per plumbingsupply.com and everything else I could find online, NPT and FIP are interchangeable.
 

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Here is a pic of my setup to the filter under my sink if it helps.View attachment 707923
See mine below. I have an inline fitting to split off a 1/4” hose to the Steam Slayer, but there’s so little room to work with between the valve and the inner wall of the cabinet that I wasn’t able to get it connected. That’s why I’m trying to find a good way to connect it to my sink faucet instead.
 

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Thanks for clarifying. That may be the easiest thing to try first.
Picture attached. I use a 3/8” FIP to 3/8” hose barb connector on this for my wort chiller, so I know that’s correct.
Per plumbingsupply.com and everything else I could find online, NPT and FIP are interchangeable.
There are many different terms used for pipe threads.
Plagiarized from another website:
NPT refers to as National Pipe Threads, which is a term defined by ANSI (American National Standards Institute). NPT fittings are the most common threads used for general purposes and feature tapered threads used for joining and sealing the fittings for use with fluids like air or gas. NPT indicates the defined standard from ANSI - but many people use MPT/MIP and FPT/FIP interchangeably. MPT stands for Male Pipe Thread and MIP stands for Male Iron Pipe which both indicate a male fitting with NPT threads. FPT stands for Female Pipe Threads and FIP stands for Female Iron Pipe which both indicate a female fitting with NPT threads.

After seeing your photo, I think I agree with @tracer bullet 's post above about possibly being straight thread. If you've already tried regular FIP, I guess you don't have anything but a little time and money to lose to try some of the above suggestions.
You can basically think of BSPP as straight and NPT as slightly tapered. And if you're talking sink hose parts there's a good chance it's a straight thread (because it relies on a gasket to seal as opposed to the fitting itself simply getting tight). In short, that may very well be the right fitting.
 

Mtrhdltd

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I stand corrected. The fitting in use for my sink is definately not NPT, and is a fine straight thread, so I don't really know what it is. Anyway not helpful to the OP.
The picture for the faucet that you are connecting to is not NPT either, the o ring seal makes me think proprietary to the faucet manufacturer. Good luck with NPT fittings. Short term use will probably be fine.
 
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There are many different terms used for pipe threads.
Plagiarized from another website:
NPT refers to as National Pipe Threads, which is a term defined by ANSI (American National Standards Institute). NPT fittings are the most common threads used for general purposes and feature tapered threads used for joining and sealing the fittings for use with fluids like air or gas. NPT indicates the defined standard from ANSI - but many people use MPT/MIP and FPT/FIP interchangeably. MPT stands for Male Pipe Thread and MIP stands for Male Iron Pipe which both indicate a male fitting with NPT threads. FPT stands for Female Pipe Threads and FIP stands for Female Iron Pipe which both indicate a female fitting with NPT threads.

After seeing your photo, I think I agree with @tracer bullet 's post above about possibly being straight thread. If you've already tried regular FIP, I guess you don't have anything but a little time and money to lose to try some of the above suggestions.
I’m about to order the part he linked to now. We’ll see how it works out, and I have some other options here to try if necessary. Thanks again to everyone for your help!
 

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TBH after seeing exactly what you are connecting to, I'm not sure it'll work. I think the thread type is straight, but I think that extended section & O-ring will get in the way of it being fully tightened. Plus it doesn't have many threads available, you'll max out the tightening before any gaskets get seated.

You can try it but I am not optimistic. If it were me I'd keep searching.

There's also a chance the hose for the sprayer isn't rated for higher pressure. It is normally used with the sprayer actually spraying, and not a lot of pressure can build up. It might be just fine, can't say for sure, but it's a consideration.

Unfortunate how tight your valve is in that corner. Most are pretty easily accessed. Dang.

You / we will think of something... What brand faucet do you have? Any idea how old?
 
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TBH after seeing exactly what you are connecting to, I'm not sure it'll work. I think the thread type is straight, but I think that extended section & O-ring will get in the way of it being fully tightened. Plus it doesn't have many threads available, you'll max out the tightening before any gaskets get seated.

You can try it but I am not optimistic. If it were me I'd keep searching.

There's also a chance the hose for the sprayer isn't rated for higher pressure. It is normally used with the sprayer actually spraying, and not a lot of pressure can build up. It might be just fine, can't say for sure, but it's a consideration.

Unfortunate how tight your valve is in that corner. Most are pretty easily accessed. Dang.

You / we will think of something... What brand faucet do you have? Any idea how old?
I already ordered it. I think it could work. See the picture below of the fitting I use to attach my wort chiller to the faucet hose. This looks very similar in design and may even be deeper than the part you found, and it seats securely, though it will drip slowly under higher pressure (pressure doesn’t get high enough with chiller).

That tubing and other fitting you see in my picture is the “adapter” I rigged up to connect the Steam Slayer. The first tube I used was a flimsy and split, but this a CO2 hose I’m using now. This is my last resort if I can’t get something more “professional” to work. For my wort chiller, I just connect the chiller hose directly to the barb on the top fitting.

Here’s my faucet:

 

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Unless you have a fitting on hand that is 3/8" FNPT or FIP and can test it on that faucet thread, I wouldn't assume it was. They use all kinds of weird proprietary thread types within the bounds of a faucet "product"... they only standardize at the supply side.
 
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I can't see anywhere that combination is offered in a single fitting. Might have to get creative and scab it together a little bit. Maybe these 2 items together?
Maybe this will work?


If that's not the right part, give freshwatersystems.com's fitting finder a try. I've yet to not find what I need buried in their tables...

Cheers!
Well a day of no luck for me. The BSP part arrived from Freshwater Systems, and it was actually too shallow for me to even begin to screw my faucet fitting into it.

8A7E82EB-0D59-4DA8-B7C6-DC6D54ADC35B.jpeg


Then I went to Home Depot and couldn’t find a 3/8 to 3/8 coupler despite them showing as in stock online. Instead I got a 3/8 to 1/4 coupler and then a John Guest 1/4 to 1/4 push-to-connect. This seemed to assemble perfectly and looked and felt 100% secure. Unfortunately when I turned on the water, water begin to back up and leak out behind the faucet fitting.

FA361A4E-8403-4B41-BF17-5AA91668198F.jpeg


It’s just totally unpredictable whether any given option will work and there’s no way to test it without purchasing the parts and trying at home. I think my best bet is to just go with the adapter I rigged up myself previously (3/8 FIP to 3/8 barb connected to tubing with 3/8 barb to 3/4 GHT attached to other end). This time I’m going to make sure to use reinforced braided tubing to prevent the hose from splitting during use.
 

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Did you apply Teflon tape to the fittings that were metal to metal?? If not, do so. Without the tape on the threads, chances are they won't seal well enough to prevent leaks. This is why you see o-rings/gaskets on hose fittings and you'll see the white tape on other water (or even air) threaded fittings.
 

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What does the male threaded end of that jacketed hose actually look like naked?

Cheers!
 
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Did you apply Teflon tape to the fittings that were metal to metal?? If not, do so. Without the tape on the threads, chances are they won't seal well enough to prevent leaks. This is why you see o-rings/gaskets on hose fittings and you'll see the white tape on other water (or even air) threaded fittings.
It wouldn’t have made a difference unfortunately. It was leaking between the hose and the hose fitting, not through the threads of the hose fitting and coupler.

What does the male threaded end of that jacketed hose actually look like naked?

Cheers!
See post number 17.
 

day_trippr

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Ah - that was posted after my suggestion and I missed the subsequent eye test ;)
Yeah, I can see all kinds of issues finding anything that'll fit it properly: what makes that fitting leak-tight is the O-ring, not the threaded section...

1606886711701.png
 

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Can you install a tee with a valve at the cold water inlet to the faucet, instead of at the outlet of the faucet (red circled area in the diagram)? That will be a standard 3/8" compression thread and should be easy to make a connection.
Screenshot 2020-12-02 060159.jpg
 

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Agreed to both the last 2 posts above.

At the sprayer, it's the o-ring going into some sort of pocket that makes a seal. Even thread tape won't help because you wouldn't be able to get it where the leak is happening. It's an uncommon design, most pull-down sprayers have a standardized threaded fitting there.

Running an adapter where the cold water enters the faucet is a great idea. That hose coming off your valve, where it hits the actual faucet, would indeed be standardized on the end and a splitter might be able to be found.

I have another idea... that odd sprayer attachment w/ the o-ring looks a little like how sprayer hoses sometimes attach under the sink. Yours looks almost like it operates as an extension cord in electrical terms. Male on one end, female on the other. So - could you get a replacement hose, to gain the proper connection at the sprayer, then cut the other side to slip onto a hose barb?

Here's an example: Delta Hose Assembly-RP32527 - The Home Depot

That brass end in the bottom of the picture is your magical connector you are looking for. For the other end, you just cut the end off and attach the bare hose to a barbed fitting.

Assuming it is indeed the right connection and you can find one cheaper. It'd be tough to spend $65 and have it not work. If it works though you have a nice plug & play system.

If nothing else maybe it gives an idea path to try?
 

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It wouldn’t have made a difference unfortunately. It was leaking between the hose and the hose fitting, not through the threads of the hose fitting and coupler.



See post number 17.
If it's leaking between the hose and the rest of the fitting, then the hose itself has failed. Time to replace. Unless you have the tools to replace the crimped on end that is. Might be better to replace the entire thing with something that uses more standard fitting sizes so that you don't go through this again.
 
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Can you install a tee with a valve at the cold water inlet to the faucet, instead of at the outlet of the faucet (red circled area in the diagram)? That will be a standard 3/8" compression thread and should be easy to make a connection.View attachment 708679
No, the cold water supply line disappears into the faucet assembly under the counter. Can’t access a connection.

Agreed to both the last 2 posts above.

At the sprayer, it's the o-ring going into some sort of pocket that makes a seal. Even thread tape won't help because you wouldn't be able to get it where the leak is happening. It's an uncommon design, most pull-down sprayers have a standardized threaded fitting there.

Running an adapter where the cold water enters the faucet is a great idea. That hose coming off your valve, where it hits the actual faucet, would indeed be standardized on the end and a splitter might be able to be found.

I have another idea... that odd sprayer attachment w/ the o-ring looks a little like how sprayer hoses sometimes attach under the sink. Yours looks almost like it operates as an extension cord in electrical terms. Male on one end, female on the other. So - could you get a replacement hose, to gain the proper connection at the sprayer, then cut the other side to slip onto a hose barb?

Here's an example: Delta Hose Assembly-RP32527 - The Home Depot

That brass end in the bottom of the picture is your magical connector you are looking for. For the other end, you just cut the end off and attach the bare hose to a barbed fitting.

Assuming it is indeed the right connection and you can find one cheaper. It'd be tough to spend $65 and have it not work. If it works though you have a nice plug & play system.

If nothing else maybe it gives an idea path to try?
Well that sounds essentially like what I was doing by connecting a barb to the hose and then running a short piece of tubing to another barb that the Steam Slayer could connect to. The fatal flaw with that the last time around was that the vinyl tubing I used was too thin and split under the pressure, so if I use reinforced tubing, that shouldn’t happen. Do you see anything wrong with that route?

If it's leaking between the hose and the rest of the fitting, then the hose itself has failed. Time to replace. Unless you have the tools to replace the crimped on end that is. Might be better to replace the entire thing with something that uses more standard fitting sizes so that you don't go through this again.
No, the hose hasn’t failed. The fitting on the hose fits loosely on the hose. The only thing that holds it on is a plastic piece that snaps onto the end of the faucet hose. As others have said above, if the gasket on the hose end isn’t seated perfectly in another fitting, it won’t seal, thus water backs up and runs out in the gap between the hose fitting and the hose.
 

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How much time and energy are you going to spend on this before you stop trying to Rube Goldberg the connections?? ;)

Have you looked at McMaster or a plumbing supplier (online or local)?
 

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No, the cold water supply line disappears into the faucet assembly under the counter. Can’t access a connection.



Well that sounds essentially like what I was doing by connecting a barb to the hose and then running a short piece of tubing to another barb that the Steam Slayer could connect to. The fatal flaw with that the last time around was that the vinyl tubing I used was too thin and split under the pressure, so if I use reinforced tubing, that shouldn’t happen. Do you see anything wrong with that route?



No, the hose hasn’t failed. The fitting on the hose fits loosely on the hose. The only thing that holds it on is a plastic piece that snaps onto the end of the faucet hose. As others have said above, if the gasket on the hose end isn’t seated perfectly in another fitting, it won’t seal, thus water backs up and runs out in the gap between the hose fitting and the hose.
If the end of the hose on the faucet cannot be accessed, how would you be able to replace the faucet when it fails? Assuming that the tubing shown in your earlier photo that is connected to the valve IS the faucet supply hose, here's a solution:

1) Turn off the valve and disconnect the existing tubing from the valve. Pull the tubing into the other cabinet where the faucet exists.
2) Install a SS braided supply hose with 3/8 female compression ends through the now vacant hole in the cabinet and connect it to the valve. You now have access to both the end of the new hose and to the faucet supply hose.
3) Install a 3/8 x 3/8 x 3/8 compression tee between the two hoses.
4) Install a 3/8 compression valve on the third port of the tee.
5) Connect a dishwasher supply hose with a 3/8 compression X female garden hose end to the new valve.
6) Install a male garden hose X male garden hose connector in the female garden hose connection of the new hose.
7) Install the garden hose thread push to connect adapter that was supplied with the steam slayer.

Parts list:

DuraPro 3/8 in. Compression x 3/8 in. Compression x 12 in. Braided Stainless Steel Faucet Supply Line-157713 - The Home Depot

BrassCraft 3/8 in. Female Compression Inlet x 3/8 in. Compression Outlet 1/4-Turn Straight Ball Valve-KTCR11FX C1 - The Home Depot

Everbilt 3/8 in. OD Compression Brass Tee Fitting-800749 - The Home Depot

CERTIFIED APPLIANCE ACCESSORIES 5 ft. Braided Stainless Steel Dishwasher Connector with Elbow-DW60SSL - The Home Depot

Everbilt 3/4 in. MHT Brass Coupling Fitting-801679 - The Home Depot
 
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If the end of the hose on the faucet cannot be accessed, how would you be able to replace the faucet when it fails? Assuming that the tubing shown in your earlier photo that is connected to the valve IS the faucet supply hose, here's a solution:

1) Turn off the valve and disconnect the existing tubing from the valve. Pull the tubing into the other cabinet where the faucet exists.
2) Install a SS braided supply hose with 3/8 female compression ends through the now vacant hole in the cabinet and connect it to the valve. You now have access to both the end of the new hose and to the faucet supply hose.
3) Install a 3/8 x 3/8 x 3/8 compression tee between the two hoses.
4) Install a 3/8 compression valve on the third port of the tee.
5) Connect a dishwasher supply hose with a 3/8 compression X female garden hose end to the new valve.
6) Install a male garden hose X male garden hose connector in the female garden hose connection of the new hose.
7) Install the garden hose thread push to connect adapter that was supplied with the steam slayer.

Parts list:

DuraPro 3/8 in. Compression x 3/8 in. Compression x 12 in. Braided Stainless Steel Faucet Supply Line-157713 - The Home Depot

BrassCraft 3/8 in. Female Compression Inlet x 3/8 in. Compression Outlet 1/4-Turn Straight Ball Valve-KTCR11FX C1 - The Home Depot

Everbilt 3/8 in. OD Compression Brass Tee Fitting-800749 - The Home Depot

CERTIFIED APPLIANCE ACCESSORIES 5 ft. Braided Stainless Steel Dishwasher Connector with Elbow-DW60SSL - The Home Depot

Everbilt 3/4 in. MHT Brass Coupling Fitting-801679 - The Home Depot
Maybe I was misunderstanding what you’re saying. The supply line connected to the shutoff valve goes directly into the faucet assembly. Another line extends down from the faucet assembly and connects to the spray hose, but I’m not familiar with the way it’s connected.

That being said, I see where you’re going with this latest message, but I don’t think I would require so many parts. I could just buy a short supply hose to connect to the shutoff valve to give me access to the connection as you said. Then I could connect a 3/8 compression male union to that short supply hose and then the John Guest inline tee that Brew Hardware supplies (see pic below) to the other side of the nipple, and connect the faucet supply to the other side of the John Guest fitting. Then connect the push-to-connect tubing to the John Guest piece and run straight to the Steam Slayer.

Such a simple idea that never even occurred to me. Thanks!

451C3273-712E-454F-9C0E-C69C8C410CD3.jpeg
 

esdill

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Bingo! I think you're on your way to a good solution, glad I could help get the ball rolling.
 
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mcmeador

mcmeador

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Bingo! I think you're on your way to a good solution, glad I could help get the ball rolling.
Now I just have to order a new John Guest fitting because I tore the threads up on the other one trying to screw it in at an awkward angle in that tight space in the cabinet. 🤦🏻‍♂️
 

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