Having an Gravity issue

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Waldo913

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Ok, so I did a Mac and Jacks, African Amber clone (with a twist) all grain last weekend. I used a yeast starter (no nutrients...though I will be doing so next batch). I used a strike temp of 167 and mashed at 155 for 90 minutes. All the h2o is calculated and correct. My twist to the clone was by adding 2 cups of turbinardo sugar (hoping for a higher ABV). My OG was 1060 when it went to primary. I watched it over the first couple of days, and the activity was there nut not too exciting or crazy. I changed it to secondary today. Flavor is right, gravity was a tad shocking at 1020! I guess I was hoping for something higher?
Any hints? I still need to add .5 oz of Cascade hops on the last 5 days....
Let me know your thoughts
 

ChessRockwell

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I changed it to secondary today. Flavor is right, gravity was a tad shocking at 1020! I guess I was hoping for something higher?
Any hints? I still need to add .5 oz of Cascade hops on the last 5 days....
Let me know your thoughts
You were expecting/wanting something HIGHER than 1.020 from 1.060? ...why?
 

Seedly

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A few questions that might help zero in on your problem:
- What yeast were you using and what temp did you pitch it at?
- What was your expected OG? Did you hit it? Do you know what kind of efficiency you got?
- Did you have any issues with the mash?

By my math, it looks like you hit 5.3% ABV with 66% attenuation. Depending on the yeast you used, you may only get another 1-2% out of it.

One thought: if you doughed-in at 160F and mashed at 155F, then you may not have had much beta-amylase and limit dextrinase reaction in the mash. This would lead to a lower-fermentability wort with more long-chain and branch-chain sugars (oligosaccharides and limit dextrins). A multi-step mash will help break down those sugars and make them fermentable.

If this was the problem, then you would see the long-chain saccharides react in an iodine test by turning a reddish-brown (as opposed to yellow with no reaction or blue-black with starches still present). Dunno if you can still do the test after starting fermentation though as I dont know how the yeast would react with the iodine.

Theory: Enzyme Breakdown of Starch and The Sugars that you arent fermenting if you dont mash under ~145F at all
Practical Application: Multi-step mashing by John Palmer
 
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