Has Fermentation Begun? (Pic)

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Nexus555

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So yesterday I finally brewed my first batch in 15 years! I got a West Coast Pale Ale extract kit from my local homebrew shop.

This morning, approximately 12 hours after pitching the yeast, I saw no obvious signs of fermentation. No foamy head and no bubbles in the air lock. I forgot to oxygenate my wort, so I took off the airlock and swirled/swished the wort for about 2 minutes.

It has been about 24 hours and I still see no signs of the air lock bubbling, but there are now little bubbles all over the surface. I have attached a pic. Does this look like fermentation? I imagined it would be more vigorous. These bubbles appeared approximately 7 hours ago.

Sadly I dropped my hydrometer and could not take an OG. Btw, the beer is exactly at 67 degrees.

PXL_20220606_015129178.jpg
 
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Kickass

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It’s starting. It should be well underway soon.

What yeast?
What volume of wort?
What was the estimated OG from the LHBS?
 
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Nexus555

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It’s starting. It should be well underway soon.

What yeast?
What volume of wort?
What was the estimated OG from the LHBS?

Yeast: US-05 Safale Dry (1 packet)
Volume: 5 gallons total
Estimated OG: 1.055

I pitched yeast right at 67 degrees approximately 1 hour after the boil once I cooled the wort. I did not hydrate.
 
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Nexus555

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It’ll be ripping in no time.
Thanks for the reassurance. I was very nervous seeing it dormant this morning as all the LBS are closed on Sundays. Also, it feels weird to think about it sitting for so long with no activity. I am always nervous about spoilage, lol. Anyways, I will keep everyone updated. I am also about to be on the hunt for a recipe. I will likely buy another 6.5 carboy soon so I can have two going at once. Thanks again.
 

bracconiere

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It’ll be ripping in no time.

i think you're right, hopefully he's got enough head space it doesn't blow his bung out....67f is pretty mellow though...

I will likely buy another 6.5 carboy soon so I can have two going at once


obviously you're a player! ;) (just remember 10 gallon batches aren't any more time consuming to make!)
 

RM-MN

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Thanks for the reassurance. I was very nervous seeing it dormant this morning as all the LBS are closed on Sundays. Also, it feels weird to think about it sitting for so long with no activity. I am always nervous about spoilage, lol. Anyways, I will keep everyone updated. I am also about to be on the hunt for a recipe. I will likely buy another 6.5 carboy soon so I can have two going at once. Thanks again.

DON'T!!m Don't buy another carboy! Carboy's are heavy, fragile, slippery, and can send you to the emergency room in a split second. Plastic buckets have been in use for brewing by a lot of people for many years and do the same job as a carboy but they have so many advantages.

With a bucket the opening is large so you can simply pour the wort in. When the fermentation is over and you have emptied the bucket, that same large opening will give you access to clean. Bucket come with a handle for easy carrying and if dropped they bounce instead of breaking into sharp pieces. If you have several buckets (they are cheap enough to have more than 2) and aren't using them for a time you can stack them inside one another.

The downside of the bucket is you cannot see the fermentation through the side but you have a carboy already to see that and once seen they all seem to be about the same.
 

jerrylotto

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You might want to consider pitching another packet. For a 5 gallon batch at 1.055, one packet of dry yeast is borderline under pitching.
 
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These were mentioned in recent topics.




1654383466244-png.770846

  • or 50 (to 80) grams per 26.42 gallons
  • or 1.9 (to 3.0) grams per gallon
so roughly one pack for a 5 gal wort.




From Fermentis Tips & Tricks:
1654516701587.png



Brewers are also posting tilt graphs that show SG during fermentation - and they suggest similar results.
 

jerrylotto

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These were mentioned in recent topics.




1654383466244-png.770846

  • or 50 (to 80) grams per 26.42 gallons
  • or 1.9 (to 3.0) grams per gallon
so roughly one pack for a 5 gal wort.




From Fermentis Tips & Tricks:
View attachment 771015


Brewers are also posting tilt graphs that show SG during fermentation - and they suggest similar results.
Depends on how viable the pack it is. It's rare that 100% of the 11.5 g in a packet is viable yeast, depending on age and storage characteristics. If you use the high end of your estimate you're still at a pack and a half for a 5 gallon batch. IMHO over pitching is always preferable to under pitching.
 
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IMHO over pitching is always preferable to under pitching.
Noted.



More generally, the idea of higher pitch rates has been a frequent topic recently.

In one of those topics, there is a link to a previous discussion about people getting good results with certain dry strains when 'under-pitching'.



FWIW, I find that guidance on pitch rates from yeast labs / brands is a solid starting point. Also, the ancedotal measurements from people who use Tilts also seem to be confirming some of what the yeast labs / brands are recommending.



eta: direct link to the topic on 'under-pitching' (click here)
 
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Nexus555

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DON'T!!m Don't buy another carboy! Carboy's are heavy, fragile, slippery, and can send you to the emergency room in a split second. Plastic buckets have been in use for brewing by a lot of people for many years and do the same job as a carboy but they have so many advantages.

With a bucket the opening is large so you can simply pour the wort in. When the fermentation is over and you have emptied the bucket, that same large opening will give you access to clean. Bucket come with a handle for easy carrying and if dropped they bounce instead of breaking into sharp pieces. If you have several buckets (they are cheap enough to have more than 2) and aren't using them for a time you can stack them inside one another.

The downside of the bucket is you cannot see the fermentation through the side but you have a carboy already to see that and once seen they all seem to be about the same.
Yeah, I definitely won't get a traditional carboy for sure. I am still exploring options.
 
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US-05 can be slow (relative to other strains) to show signs of fermentation.

FWIW, just before Fermentis launched their E2U program, I heard a tip (regarding active dry yeast) from a pro brewer:

Treat each strain differently

US-05 can be slow starting. Some Lallemand strains require a higher pitch rate. ...

Guidance from yeast labs / brands is a solid starting point.



With regard to viability: There are a number of Fermentis videos from 2020 / 2021 that discuss viability and the 'best by' date (IIRC, 'best by' date accounts for viability when offering guidance on initial pitch rates).

It's likely the Lallemand has similar videos.
 
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jerrylotto

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Yeah, I definitely won't get a traditional carboy for sure. I am still exploring options.
I absolutely love my FastFerment conical and it was very inexpensive for the 7 gallon version. The only downside to it in my opinion is that you have to be able to lift it when it's full. I also have an SS Brew bucket stainless conical, but I really don't like not being able to see what's going on inside. The Fermzilla is very similar to the Fastferment and both are short money in comparison to other options.
 

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You might want to consider pitching another packet. For a 5 gallon batch at 1.055, one packet of dry yeast is borderline under pitching.
Anecdotally, this has never been my experience. In 15 years of brewing I’ve never pitched more than 1 pack of us-05 in a five gallon batch unless the OG is over 1.070. This is just one person’s experience, YMMV.
 

bwible

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DON'T!!m Don't buy another carboy! Carboy's are heavy, fragile, slippery, and can send you to the emergency room in a split second. Plastic buckets have been in use for brewing by a lot of people for many years and do the same job as a carboy but they have so many advantages.

With a bucket the opening is large so you can simply pour the wort in. When the fermentation is over and you have emptied the bucket, that same large opening will give you access to clean. Bucket come with a handle for easy carrying and if dropped they bounce instead of breaking into sharp pieces. If you have several buckets (they are cheap enough to have more than 2) and aren't using them for a time you can stack them inside one another.

The downside of the bucket is you cannot see the fermentation through the side but you have a carboy already to see that and once seen they all seem to be about the same.
Or I like the plastic carboys like Fermonster. I have a couple of those and they are great. You can even get them with a faucet to do oxygen reduced transfers if you’re so inclined.
 

Dancy

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Yeah, I definitely won't get a traditional carboy for sure. I am still exploring options.
I brew 5-6 gallon batches and really like my Speidel fermenters. I think they’re somewhat over priced (more so with recent increases) but I love the handles and the overall quality is terrific, IMO. Two on opposing sides and very strong. I find them easy to clean as well.
 

Sergei

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Yeast: US-05 Safale Dry (1 packet)
Dry yeasts usually do not need aeration. The producer of US-05, Fermentis, says: "We don’t recommend aerating the wort in normal conditions. The dry yeast has been produced and dried with a specific know-how of the Lesaffre Group, in order to maximize the Ergosterols content of the cells." (Q&A). By opening air lock and dancing with the fermenter you increased a chance to catch wild yeasts and other bacteria. Anyway, hope your beer will be good :)
 
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There’s something to be said for variety too.
IIRC, all three major US magazines (or their web sites) are out with articles over the past month or two on how to split and blend worts.

I'm pretty sure that the "leading edge" of forum discussion was talking about this late last year.

So give @bracconiere a couple of months to catch up (order smaller fermenters?, cold steep some Victory malt? 🤷‍♂️ ).
 

bracconiere

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So give @bracconiere a couple of months to catch up (order smaller fermenters?, cold steep some Victory malt? 🤷‍♂️ ).


LOL didn't realize this topic moved to fermenter recomendations....ain't cheap, but i'm still liking my milk pails....mine are 16 gallon, and were $150 a piece...but here's a nice fermenter really easy to clean, way easier then plastic...and the o-ring in the lid is silicone, so should last...

 

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Yeah, I definitely won't get a traditional carboy for sure. I am still exploring options.


Get these. IMO, best fermenter for the money.

Fermonster 6 Gallon Carboy

There's also a thread on modifying these. I have a friend of mine that bought all of mine. I wished I'd at least kept a couple. He's not being brewing much, so hoping I can buy a couple of them back.
 

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Get these. IMO, best fermenter for the money.

Fermonster 6 Gallon Carboy

There's also a thread on modifying these. I have a friend of mine that bought all of mine. I wished I'd at least kept a couple. He's not being brewing much, so hoping I can buy a couple of them back.
Jesus christ 35$?
I bought something similar last week and they’re like 1.5$ in my country
 

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Yesfan

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Jesus christ 35$?
I bought something similar last week and they’re like 1.5$ in my country


Inflation is a bitch.


I like how yours has a built in handle like a regular bucket vs having to use a separate carrier. And I'm assuming a $1.50 is a typo. Even at $15, that's quite the deal!
 
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Nexus555

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Update here: tomorrow, I will add my dry hops to this and next weekend it will time to bottle!

Also, I told my wife I want the Anvil Fermenter for Father's Day! I've decided after research that it will be the best fit for me. The only concern I have is I have a 7 cu chest freezer, and I'm not sure if two would fit in there at the same time. While I won't have two for a while anyways, it is a legitimate concern as I bought that size freezer to fit two fermenting vessels at a time. From using Anvil's measurements, it seems I will only have .25 inch separating them. I'll likely have to use an Anvil and choose some other Fermenter in the future.
 

Yesfan

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Update here: tomorrow, I will add my dry hops to this and next weekend it will time to bottle!

Also, I told my wife I want the Anvil Fermenter for Father's Day! I've decided after research that it will be the best fit for me. The only concern I have is I have a 7 cu chest freezer, and I'm not sure if two would fit in there at the same time. While I won't have two for a while anyways, it is a legitimate concern as I bought that size freezer to fit two fermenting vessels at a time. From using Anvil's measurements, it seems I will only have .25 inch separating them. I'll likely have to use an Anvil and choose some other Fermenter in the future.


I like the Anvil stuff (and Blichmann), but I'm staying with the Fermonsters for my recommendation if you're worried about chest freezer space. It's the cheapest option unless you know someone that can get those $1.50 Iranian carboys (<-----What a crazy deal!)

If you're intent on stainless, there's always your kegs as an alternative. They're taller and skinnier so you may be able to fit more of them in your chest freezer vs the Anvil or even the Fermonster. The biggest issue with the Anvil fermenters that I don't like is the handles sticking out and not being able to fold down against the fermenter's body. Not a big deal in an open room, but a small chest freezer is another issue.
 

RM-MN

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Update here: tomorrow, I will add my dry hops to this and next weekend it will time to bottle!

Also, I told my wife I want the Anvil Fermenter for Father's Day! I've decided after research that it will be the best fit for me. The only concern I have is I have a 7 cu chest freezer, and I'm not sure if two would fit in there at the same time. While I won't have two for a while anyways, it is a legitimate concern as I bought that size freezer to fit two fermenting vessels at a time. From using Anvil's measurements, it seems I will only have .25 inch separating them. I'll likely have to use an Anvil and choose some other Fermenter in the future.
Are you planning to do two brews in one day or will there be time between? Ales only need to be kept cool during the first few days when the fermentation is vigorous. By day 3 or 4 you can take one out and leave it at room temp so you have room for the second fermenter.
 
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Nexus555

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Are you planning to do two brews in one day or will there be time between? Ales only need to be kept cool during the first few days when the fermentation is vigorous. By day 3 or 4 you can take one out and leave it at room temp so you have room for the second fermenter.

Didn't realize this until you mentioned it. Thanks for the advice!

When I eventually get my Anvil Fermenter (I ordered it last night), can I gently stir priming sugar into the vessel and just bottle out of the Anvil Fermenter? Seems like it would save a step, and also, I can't imagine gently stirring the priming sugar would be much different when considering oxidation than transferring it into a seperate bottling bucket. I suppose the main issue would be stirring up sediment. I plan on using a colander when I get that bad boy which will reduce sediment, but of course, not all yeast sediment.
 

RM-MN

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I think that you will get a lot of sediment mixed in well before you can get a good mix of the priming sugar.

There is much ado about oxygen in the beer and while it is wise to avoid oxygen, it isn't the big deal as many seem to make it except for highly hopped beers. I notice that the hop aroma of my pale ales dissappears in 3-4 months but that seems to be the worst problem. A bigger problem is not getting the priming sugar well mixed so you get some bottles with very little carbonation while others, because they got more priming sugar, become gushers when opened. For now, use the bottling bucket so you avoid the sediment but get the priming sugar well mixed. I use a big spoon to gently stir the beer to make sure the sugar solution is well mixed.
 
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