Has anyone used this yeast?

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dhoyt714

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This yeast is my second brew and this is a new way of pitching the yeast for me.

My questions are why do I need to mix the yeast with 86f-92f if I'am pitching the yeast at around 70 degrees?

Is this what you consider a yeast starter? I'am kind of skeptical of using this because of all the extra work involved.

Could someone shed some light.

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elvestinkle

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Two things:

1. Notty's fantastic. You made a pretty good choice.

2. I've had good success just sprinkling it onto the wort. But those instructions are not terribly complicated; they're just a useful way to make sure your yeast is still viable.
 

Quadrupled

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This is just a rehydration - some brewers do it, others skip it and just sprinkle the yeast on top of the wort. There are folks who prefer one method over the other.
 

geer537

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I rehydrate all the time. This post has a good explanation. No harm in not doing it but you'll lose a bit of viability if you beleive the post.
 

jonmohno

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You need to make a starter or pitch more yeast if you have a higher gravity beer.Assuming its average gravity just pitch it but if you want to hydrate it do it with preboiled water cooled to the suggested temp and yeah after that sits for 15-20 min add it to your cooler wort, (I sometimes add a small amount of the wort after 15 to adjust to the cooler temps its going to be in) and if you aerate your wort just pitch it in after,its easy but just another step if that doesnt bother you.My experience is that hydrated yeast had less lag time for a start,not that i was concerned about when it starts too much but i just noticed it took half the time than it did before when i was pitching dry.Pitching dry is fine.Ive made plenty of good beer pitching dry.
 

jaytizzle

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I just used that same packet of Notty for my koelsch (Brewer's Best kit). I followed the instructions on the packet and within 15 minutes I had a happily active and bubbling yeast mixture ready to be pitched over the wort. I've read that it can go either way, though (leave dry and pitch or rehydrate and pitch). Mine turned out fine and, if nothing else, fermented a little fast. This may have been due to the rehydrating but it was my first brew so who the heck knows!
 

jonmohno

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Too fast could be too high a temp.Mine typically feremnt 2-5days mostly 2-3.
 

BradleyBrew

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Thats probably the most popular dry yeast on the market. That or US-05. Its a great yeast. If your OG is below 1.060 I would just sprinkle it on top of the wort. I used it for a 10% IIPA and it was very good with 1 re-hydrated pack.
 
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dhoyt714

dhoyt714

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It says on the packet that it should be stored at 41-50f. It was shipped via fed-ex from northern brewer, and then at 80 degrees in my apartment. Should I still use it?
 

PIGMAN

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I used to just sprinkle the dry yeast, and the beer came out fine for the most part, but for the last 5 batches or so, I rehydrated, and I would not go back to sprinkling it dry. The lag time was greatly reduced, and the active fermentation seemed more vigorous, even at the bottom end of the yeast's range. I think it's worth the extra step.:mug:
 
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I used to just sprinkle the dry yeast, and the beer came out fine for the most part, but for the last 5 batches or so, I rehydrated, and I would not go back to sprinkling it dry. The lag time was greatly reduced, and the active fermentation seemed more vigorous, even at the bottom end of the yeast's range. I think it's worth the extra step.:mug:
that's cuz you can lose something like 50% viability pitching it dry. it's a much better idea to rehydrate, or pitch twice as much yeast.


I'am kind of skeptical of using this because of all the extra work involved.
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:confused: i hope you're being sarcastic. the only 'extra work' is pouring the yeast into water and waiting ~15 mins then pouring the rehydrated yeast into the wort. if pre boiling and chilling to ~80 degrees is too much, you can always use bottled spring water.
 

CPFITNESS

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This yeast is my second brew and this is a new way of pitching the yeast for me.

My questions are why do I need to mix the yeast with 86f-92f if I'am pitching the yeast at around 70 degrees?

Is this what you consider a yeast starter? I'am kind of skeptical of using this because of all the extra work involved.

Could someone shed some light.
do you really consider mixing yeast with 4 oz of water that much work? it's quite easy, yes i do it that way. the warmer temps gets the yeast working quicker and is sort of like creating a starter but not really. follow the directions, it will work great.
 
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dhoyt714

dhoyt714

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No i didn't mean it'd that much more work. This is my second brew and just a little skeptical of something I know a little about.

But you guys have convinced me.

Thanks for the info!
 
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Do you ave any evidence to support this? Just curious.


:rolleyes: i should first reword that.... you could lose up to 50% viability. but i believe the topic's been discussed a time or two here and by some respected brewers.

this thread touches on it.....

as does this one, read post 15 and listen to the podcast referenced.

this section of how to brew discusses how it can be harmful to yeast cell membranes to rehyrate in wort instead of water.

Dr. Cone discusses the topic here, even goes into different temps for different strain. i believe he says something about as much as 60% viability can be lost without proper hydration.

i can find more links if you want, but that should suffice for now. it's not just a viability issue either, there's numerous reasons to rehydrate. that said, i've made great beer just sprinkling dry yeast onto the wort, but the more i learn about yeast health, the more i try to do everything i can to ensure it.


i can find more links if you want, but that should suffice for now
 
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