Has anyone had success in growing hops in Missouri? If so what species?

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Aleforge

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About 15 years ago I got a few of my favorite varieties. Built a pretty nice structure, planted them carefully and was super pumped to elevate the "homebrewing" aspect of the hobby. However.... they all died. I had no idea at the time that the climate in my state isn't ideal and can actually make it fairly difficult to consistently grow them. Not to mention from some light reading I did, not all varieties even stand much chance here.

Fast forward to today and I have gotten fairly adept at gardening, and take really good care of my plants (peppers in particular). I feel more capable of taking on the challenge than I did years ago. So that got me thinking once again about hops, and figured someone in the forum has to be not only from Missouri, but have also attempted to grow them.

With that being said, has anyone actually had success here? If so are there certain varieties that you found are best?
 

Aleface

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About 15 years ago I got a few of my favorite varieties. Built a pretty nice structure, planted them carefully and was super pumped to elevate the "homebrewing" aspect of the hobby. However.... they all died. I had no idea at the time that the climate in my state isn't ideal and can actually make it fairly difficult to consistently grow them. Not to mention from some light reading I did, not all varieties even stand much chance here.

Fast forward to today and I have gotten fairly adept at gardening, and take really good care of my plants (peppers in particular). I feel more capable of taking on the challenge than I did years ago. So that got me thinking once again about hops, and figured someone in the forum has to be not only from Missouri, but have also attempted to grow them.

With that being said, has anyone actually had success here? If so are there certain varieties that you found are best?
HI
 

Brushwood Brewing

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@Aleforge : I don't have experience growing hops in Missouri, but considering no one has provided a helpful answer in the past month, I'll say this anyway:

I'm also looking to start growing hops (in NJ) and am trying to decide on varieties. One thing I've found helpful is looking at other hop yards near me. I've had some success googling hop farms, but you might also do well visiting breweries and/or bars that use local ingredients, and ask them where they get their hops from. Then see what varieties those hop yards are growing. If they are doing it on a commercial scale, they likely did the research for you on what hop varieties grow well in your area.
 
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DBhomebrew

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Digging around for a short time, I've noticed the University of Missouri Extension was doing some hop experimenting during the last decade. Seems like they had some success.

 

LokiM4

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What in particular about your climate or location did you find that was contrary to the growing of hops? IMHO they’re pretty adaptable and resilient plants, weeds really. Now quality and volume of production may not be at peak for your specific area, but growing the plants shouldn’t be prohibitive.

Hops grow best when watered and drained well, in full sun so they don’t get diseased from humidity/moisture. You can fertilize them or treat sigh any number of sprays to prevent infestation or infection from their numerous diseases, but unless they’re doing poorly water, sun and good mulch or fertilizer is really all that’s necessary.

Did you get rhizomes or plants? Perhaps whatever you got didn’t take for any number of reasons, bad rhizomes or plants, poor soil/dense non draining clay or pure sand with no nutrients and no ability to hold any water, disease, etc? And them dying was not a fault of your local climate.
 
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