Has anyone grown Neomexicana hops?

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Crito

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I see one of our sponsors is setting up Pre orders. Got me thinking of they do well where I live.

Neomexicana is a true American hop. Not transplanted from Europe.

So far on my Google searches, the variants are Multi head, Neo1, Amallia, and Willow Creek.

Multi is peachy. Neo1 is lemon/citrus and Amallia is earthy.

I am willing to buy a few to test out. I am wondering if anyone else planted them.
 

OakPond

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I was thinking about ordering 1 of each, but not sure how they would handle the Mexico to Maine transition. I don't think these Mexican breeds will make it in the U.S on a huge scale for that reason, all the huge hop growing is in the North.
 

day_trippr

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"Crazy Mountain partnered with CLS Farms in the Yakima growing region of Washington to brew with this unheard of hop."

So....

Cheers!
 
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Crito

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They found the plants in New Mexico / Colorado region.

High elevation, extreme hot and cold seasons. I am guessing dry and humid conditions as well.

Only one that I cannot find is multi head hop. I hope a vendor will sell that rhizome. A peach flavored hop. Sounds yummy.
 

corkybstewart

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I was thinking about ordering 1 of each, but not sure how they would handle the Mexico to Maine transition. I don't think these Mexican breeds will make it in the U.S on a huge scale for that reason, all the huge hop growing is in the North.
New Mexico is actually a state in the United States, it occupies that strange space between Texas and Arizona. Mexico is that space south of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. We're kind of sensitive about people in the US not understanding the difference between Mexico and New Mexico.
 
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Crito

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New Mexico is actually a state in the United States, it occupies that strange space between Texas and Arizona. Mexico is that space south of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. We're kind of sensitive about people in the US not understanding the difference between Mexico and New Mexico.
Its my fault. I posted the name of the hop type " Neomexicana" and I did not post it was discovered in New Mexico. Neomexicana does kind of look like "Mexico". (by the casual reader).
 

roastquake

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I asked this elsewhere with no answer, does anybody know how well these stand up to humidity? I assume they like aridity as do most all hops, but if they are as hardy as Cascade then I may be able to grow them in SC. Anyone familiar?
 

OakPond

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Its my fault. I posted the name of the hop type " Neomexicana" and I did not post it was discovered in New Mexico. Neomexicana does kind of look like "Mexico". (by the casual reader).
This.

Also, regardless of the Mexico or New Mexico origin, the general point remains. You don't expect hops named Glacier, or coming from the Willamette Valley to do well in Florida, I don't see why you would expect hops originating from down south (this more sensitive for you??) to do well up north (where the majority of the hops in the U.S are grown..). It's common sense, really.
 
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Crito

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I asked this elsewhere with no answer, does anybody know how well these stand up to humidity? I assume they like aridity as do most all hops, but if they are as hardy as Cascade then I may be able to grow them in SC. Anyone familiar?
I just googled "new Mexico mountains humidity levels during summer". And it seems it gets pretty hot and humid in the summer time.
 

blizzard

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I think it would be worth a try. Being a native hop without careful cultivation practices, I imagine they are pretty hardy. The cost of rhizomes in general is pretty low and it sounds like a tasty hop and fun story.
 

corkybstewart

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This.

Also, regardless of the Mexico or New Mexico origin, the general point remains. You don't expect hops named Glacier, or coming from the Willamette Valley to do well in Florida, I don't see why you would expect hops originating from down south (this more sensitive for you??) to do well up north (where the majority of the hops in the U.S are grown..). It's common sense, really.
New Mexico is a large state and there are several climate regions. I live in the hot dry lowlands(around 3110' above sea level), the northwest is very high, dry and much cooler and then the central mountains have cool wet valleys much like inland Oregon and Idaho. BTW my Cascades(from Oregon) do very well here as long as I water them a little bit.
Mexico has 2 regions-the hot and dry, and the hot and wet.
 

roastquake

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New Mexico is a large state and there are several climate regions. I live in the hot dry lowlands(around 3110' above sea level), the northwest is very high, dry and much cooler and then the central mountains have cool wet valleys much like inland Oregon and Idaho. BTW my Cascades(from Oregon) do very well here as long as I water them a little bit.
Mexico has 2 regions-the hot and dry, and the hot and wet.
I'm an easy sell, making my pre-order today. I guess the only way to know for sure is to do it!
 

corkybstewart

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I actually had exchanged emails a few years ago with the original developers of these NM hops. They were reluctant to let anybody try them or even know where they were first found since there was no reason to believe the hops would ever be suitable for brewing. So I've been anxious to try them for years. I've run across another place selling them so I'll probably buy a few from them also to see if there is any difference.
 

eulipion2

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I just found out about these hops and am considering planting a few here in northeast PA. The growing season might be a little short, but I'm willing to risk it. Sorachi Ace rhizomes aren't available, and I'd love to grow some lemony hops for my saisons.

New Mexico is actually a state in the United States, it occupies that strange space between Texas and Arizona. Mexico is that space south of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. We're kind of sensitive about people in the US not understanding the difference between Mexico and New Mexico.
:off:I'm from West Virginia. Oh, the number of people who don't realize West Virginia is an actual state, which broke off from Virginia in 1863 to rejoin the Union while Virginia stayed with the Confederacy. You've had 150 years to realize we're there. While some West Virginians may claim to be Southern (many residents, especially in the southern part of the state, sided with the Confederacy,) the Northern Panhandle reaches farther north than Pittsburgh, Columbus, and even Philadelphia.

Of course now people who watch the news might know us for the chemical spill that has contaminated the water supply of nine counties.

That's my long-winded way of saying, "I feel your pain, brother!":off:
 
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Crito

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The sponsor farmhouse is selling them. Can anyone PM me of the other sellers please? I am definitely buying from farmhouse (they rock). But I cannot find multi head for sale.
 

McGlothan

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So can these hops be found in the wild all over NM and CO? I live about an hour from Crazy Mountain in Carbondale, CO. We have a bike path that stretches for miles and miles. There are so many wild hops growing all over this bike path in certain areas. From what I have researched online, they are most likely neomexicanus. They smell wonderful and have a lot of lupulin in them. I have picked them and made great beer with them. If these are the same hops, they grow near the river but not right next to it in very dry soil. The sun blazes all day and we hardly get any moisture here, yet they thrive! I will go and dig up a rhizome this spring and nurture it and see what I can do with these hops. I am excited to experiment!
 

PapaBearJay

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So can these hops be found in the wild all over NM and CO? I live about an hour from Crazy Mountain in Carbondale, CO. We have a bike path that stretches for miles and miles. There are so many wild hops growing all over this bike path in certain areas. From what I have researched online, they are most likely neomexicanus. They smell wonderful and have a lot of lupulin in them. I have picked them and made great beer with them. If these are the same hops, they grow near the river but not right next to it in very dry soil. The sun blazes all day and we hardly get any moisture here, yet they thrive! I will go and dig up a rhizome this spring and nurture it and see what I can do with these hops. I am excited to experiment!
Next season when you're out, mind checking in late summer for seed?
 

B-Hoppy

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"I have picked them and made great beer with them. If these are the same hops, they grow near the river but not right next to it in very dry soil. The sun blazes all day and we hardly get any moisture here, yet they thrive! "

The roots will go WAY deep to locate water and where you find them in the wild is usually in close proximity of a water source.

To find seeds, just examine the cones in the late summer. Look closely and you'll see that in an un-pollenated cone, the orientation of the bracts (bracteoles underneath) all look very very uniformly oriented. If there are any seeds formed, you'll see one or more of the bracteoles associated with that seed protruding out a little farther than the others and it's usually a little paler in color. If you've looked at lots of cones, you'll know what I'm talking about and will be able to spot them. If not, have a beer and start picking and rubbing as you'll feel the seeds rolling around between your hands as you mash them up. Hop On~
 

corkybstewart

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So can these hops be found in the wild all over NM and CO? I live about an hour from Crazy Mountain in Carbondale, CO. We have a bike path that stretches for miles and miles. There are so many wild hops growing all over this bike path in certain areas. From what I have researched online, they are most likely neomexicanus. They smell wonderful and have a lot of lupulin in them. I have picked them and made great beer with them. If these are the same hops, they grow near the river but not right next to it in very dry soil. The sun blazes all day and we hardly get any moisture here, yet they thrive! I will go and dig up a rhizome this spring and nurture it and see what I can do with these hops. I am excited to experiment!
I'd be willing to pay you for some big chunks of rhyzomes when they start sprouting. The guys who found these in NM have been very secretive about where they can be found in the wild.
 

nagmay

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"So can these hops be found in the wild all over NM and CO?"

Apparently, yes. For those interested in tracking down neomexicanus, here is a report from the 2002 USDA expedition: http://www.ars-grin.gov/cor/reprints/hopexpedition2002.pdf

A map with exact GPS is also available: https://sun.ars-grin.gov:8082/npgs_public/prodweb.gmapsp?in_acid=1642235

Last year I obtained some USDA seeds, but germination was abysmal. However, the ones that survived produced beautiful cones. If anyone does collect seeds/rhizomes please let me know as well.

hops.jpg
 

blizzard

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"So can these hops be found in the wild all over NM and CO?"

Apparently, yes. For those interested in tracking down neomexicanus, here is a report from the 2002 USDA expedition: http://www.ars-grin.gov/cor/reprints/hopexpedition2002.pdf

A map with exact GPS is also available: https://sun.ars-grin.gov:8082/npgs_public/prodweb.gmapsp?in_acid=1642235

Last year I obtained some USDA seeds, but germination was abysmal. However, the ones that survived produced beautiful cones. If anyone does collect seeds/rhizomes please let me know as well.
Thanks for the links! If I check out those sites near Golden later this year, I will definitely let you know.
 

corkybstewart

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"So can these hops be found in the wild all over NM and CO?"

Apparently, yes. For those interested in tracking down neomexicanus, here is a report from the 2002 USDA expedition: http://www.ars-grin.gov/cor/reprints/hopexpedition2002.pdf

A map with exact GPS is also available: https://sun.ars-grin.gov:8082/npgs_public/prodweb.gmapsp?in_acid=1642235

Last year I obtained some USDA seeds, but germination was abysmal. However, the ones that survived produced beautiful cones. If anyone does collect seeds/rhizomes please let me know as well.
Thanks a ton for that link. One of these sites is only a couple of hours from my house. I may talk the wife into a hop and rock collecting road trip this weekend.
 

McGlothan

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I wish I had some pictures of the ones by where I live. I will investigate this spring and will definitely be checking for seeds and getting some rhizomes. There are a few home brewers near where I live but no one seemed interested to go and pick with me. I had fun doing it on my own anyway and I am glad now that I have kept this to myself. I could grow them at home but its so easy to let nature do all of the work and I can just go collect. These are very out in the open and there are dozens of them. The ground is frozen solid now but I am excited to go back this spring. I read the same "2002 usda expedition" paper and thats where I made the conclusion that they were neomexicanus hops. Maybe I'm wrong but they are beautiful, wild and they deliver a great flavor and aroma. I am willing to share whatever I discover. Just message me in the spring!
 

roastquake

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Anybody know the storage stability of these hops? My google searches are coming up dry
 

eulipion2

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Anybody know the storage stability of these hops? My google searches are coming up dry
Why would it be any different than any other hops?
Different varieties of hops alpha acids deteriorate more rapidly than others. This storability is usually rated at 60-65 degrees F, but since most of us store our hops in the freezer it's, IMHO, not as much of an issue.

Whenever I'm interested in such things I look to beerlegends.com or something similar, but they don't have Neo-1 or Amilla listed. As an example, here's what they say about Pacific Gem:
Pacific Gem Hops maintains 70%-80% alpha acid contents after 6 months storage at 20 degrees C [68 F]
SOURCE
 

roastquake

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Interesting, yea I freeze all my hops yet this whole time I've been selecting varieties partially based on storage stability. I guess I just need to relax and.. well, you know
 

PapaBearJay

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Thanks a ton for that link. One of these sites is only a couple of hours from my house. I may talk the wife into a hop and rock collecting road trip this weekend.
Corky, if you find yourself in possession of new plant material, I'd be interested in a rhizome or seed if possible....
 

Greatlakeshops

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We are currently growing Neo1 and Amallia.

We trialed the plants last season in Michigan, and they yielded fantastically. We're still waiting for second year trials this year. Brewers in Michigan were interested in the cones, including Shorts and New Holland Brewing Company. They will likely be given enough cones this fall as part of our Brewer Trial Program in order to brew some test batches. This will determine if we want to try to establish hopyards of these varieties in Michigan.

They seem to prefer to grow in more dry conditions than wet, which seems obvious when you take the region the developed in. We don't have any details about how the hop stores at the moment.

We have spoken with the original breeder, and while he didn't give specifics of where he found his plants. The varieties that he created Amallia, Neo1, and Multihead, can be found from a few different sources online. He sold the entire breeding line to a hop producer in Washington I believe. New varieties are being bred using the Neomexicana genetics as we speak. I'm not sure what the labs out west are doing but both Neo1 and Amallia are in our breeding program and have produced viable crosses.

We will also have both varieties for sale this year. At the moment Spring sales are limited to commercial sized orders only. If we are able to build up a big enough inventory, we hope to have them available for smaller retail orders later in the season.

We also have Willow Creek growing in house too, but have yet to run that one through our trials.
 

NTexBrewer

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I live in Dallas and tried growing Neo1,
amallia and multihead last season.

I ordered 2 rhizomes of each. I had 1 neo grow, both amallia and one multi head. The multi head appeared to be male so I dug it up.

The neo1 and one amalia produced hops. I'm hopeful that with each year the quality and quantity will be better.

I used drip irrigation to water them 3 times a day as we typically have temps around 100 for most of the summer.

I'm actually going to brew a beer with my neo1 this weekend.

I did notice in the fall when the temps were cooler (90's) some of the remaining neo1 cones plumped up and smelled great. I would pick them and crush them up into a beer for some great aroma.
 

brewerelated

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Hello Nagmay, I've asked the USDA on numerous occasions for both seed and rhizomes of native North American hops, but they have never sent me anything.

I am trying to collect male plants for breeding purposes. If you could send me some seeds or rhizomes I would greatly appreciate it.

If anybody could send me some male hop rhizomes I would be more then willing send back my hybrid rhizomes in the case that I am successful in crossbreeding the hops.

"So can these hops be found in the wild all over NM and CO?"

Apparently, yes. For those interested in tracking down neomexicanus, here is a report from the 2002 USDA expedition: http://www.ars-grin.gov/cor/reprints/hopexpedition2002.pdf

A map with exact GPS is also available: https://sun.ars-grin.gov:8082/npgs_public/prodweb.gmapsp?in_acid=1642235

Last year I obtained some USDA seeds, but germination was abysmal. However, the ones that survived produced beautiful cones. If anyone does collect seeds/rhizomes please let me know as well.
 
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