Hallertauer Magnum Cascade IPA

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Sundy

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I am brewing an IPA from ingredients I have on hand. I like IPAs with a good malt backbone to support the hops. I would like some feedback on this recipie.

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: Hallertauer Magnum Cascade IPA

Brew Method: Extract
Style Name: American IPA
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 6 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 7 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.055
Efficiency: 70% (steeping grains only)

Hop Utilization Multiplier: 1

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.064
Final Gravity: 1.016
ABV (standard): 6.27%
IBU (tinseth): 84.08
SRM (morey): 8.44
Mash pH: 0

FERMENTABLES:
8 lb - DME Pale Ale (88.9%)
1 lb - Amber (11.1%)

HOPS:
1.8 oz - Hallertauer Magnum, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.9, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 70.55
1 oz - Cascade, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.6, Use: Boil for 20 min, IBU: 8.46
1 oz - Cascade, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.6, Use: Boil for 10 min, IBU: 5.07

YEAST:
Fermentis / Safale - English Ale Yeast S-04
Starter: Yes
Form: Dry
Attenuation (avg): 75%
Flocculation: High
Optimum Temp: 54 - 77 F
Fermentation Temp: 68 F
Pitch Rate: 0.35 (M cells / ml / deg P)

PRIMING:
CO2 Level: 2.25 Volumes

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
Profile Name: Light colored and hoppy
Ca2: 75
Mg2: 5
Na: 10
Cl: 50
SO4: 150
HCO3: 0
Water Notes:


This recipe has been published online at:

Generated by Brewer's Friend - Brewer's Friend | Homebrew Beer Recipes, Calculators & Forum
Date: 2021-04-21 21:48 UTC
Recipe Last Updated: 2021-04-21 21:43 UTC
 

mashpaddled

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The IBUs are fine but you're going to be short on hop flavor. For a west coast IPA 1oz/gal is a decent rule of thumb and you're a long way off. I also feel like IPAs, especially west coast style, need dry hop flavor.
 
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Sundy

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So if I dry hop with a couple of OZ you think it would be closer to style? I could do more hops at knock out too.
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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I would like some feedback on this recipie.
Consider doing a 30 minute boil rather than a 60 minute boil.

If the Cascade hops are for aroma/flavor, consider adding them closer to "flame-out".

Using an "all grain" water profile with an all DME recipe runs the risk of over-mineralizing the beer.

I'm curious as to why you are using starter with dry yeast.
 
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Sundy

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Why the shorter boil? The water is what the software fills in, I use RO water. I rehydrate but I don't use a starter. I will do a better job posting recipes.
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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The DME doesn't need to be boiled for 60 minutes. So a 30 min boil saves time. Recipe software should be able to help adjust the amount of bittering hops.
 

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my humble opinoin is that'll be awful bitter compared to the flavor and aroma contributions.
I'd think about dropping the e60 min addition down to an ounce, and maybe up the later additions. Aslo, move that 20 to 10, and the 10 to flameout or just before.
|I have a pale ale that uses an ounce cascade each at 10 and FO, and it's just a touch of hops there.
|For an |IPA you want more.
 
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I have been trying to get my head around the short boil or no-boil method. I started brewing around 1990 and we all boiled our wort for 60 minutes. I understand the time idea, I'm retired and have more time than money so that is not an issue. I have not been able to nail down a hop routine that gets the hop profile beer needs. I read some about 'hop tea' but the opinions are varied and strong. Almost any discussion about 'hop tea' gets way beyond what I care to worry about quickly. Use a Digiboil so it's cheap and easy to boil for 60 minutes and I can clean and do other tasks while waiting for my next hop addition.
 
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So now I have a SMASH IPA which I tried a few weeks ago but screwed up because I entered gain rather than DME.
Water and yeast starter fixed.
It lands toward the large end on both O.G. and IBU according to Brewersfriend style guide.

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: Hallertauer Magnum Cascade IPA

Brew Method: Extract
Style Name: American IPA
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 6 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 7 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.058
Efficiency: 70% (steeping grains only)

Hop Utilization Multiplier: 1

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.068
Final Gravity: 1.017
ABV (standard): 6.64%
IBU (tinseth): 67.02
SRM (morey): 6.74
Mash pH: 0

FERMENTABLES:
9 lb - DME Pale Ale (100%)

HOPS:
1.8 oz - Barth-Haas - Hallertauer Magnum (13.5 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 12.9, Use: Boil for 55 min, IBU: 67.02

YEAST:
Fermentis / Safale - English Ale Yeast S-04
Starter: No
Form: Dry
Attenuation (avg): 75%
Flocculation: High
Optimum Temp: 54 - 77 F
Fermentation Temp: 68 F
Pitch Rate: 0.35 (M cells / ml / deg P)

PRIMING:
CO2 Level: 2.25 Volumes

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
R.O.


This recipe has been published online at:

Generated by Brewer's Friend - Brewer's Friend | Homebrew Beer Recipes, Calculators & Forum
Date: 2021-04-22 19:02 UTC
Recipe Last Updated: 2021-04-22 19:02 UTC
 

marc1

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So now I have a SMASH IPA which I tried a few weeks ago but screwed up because I entered gain rather than DME.
Water and yeast starter fixed.
It lands toward the large end on both O.G. and IBU according to Brewersfriend style guide.

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: Hallertauer Magnum Cascade IPA

Brew Method: Extract
Style Name: American IPA
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 6 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 7 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.058
Efficiency: 70% (steeping grains only)

Hop Utilization Multiplier: 1

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.068
Final Gravity: 1.017
ABV (standard): 6.64%
IBU (tinseth): 67.02
SRM (morey): 6.74
Mash pH: 0

FERMENTABLES:
9 lb - DME Pale Ale (100%)

HOPS:
1.8 oz - Barth-Haas - Hallertauer Magnum (13.5 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 12.9, Use: Boil for 55 min, IBU: 67.02

YEAST:
Fermentis / Safale - English Ale Yeast S-04
Starter: No
Form: Dry
Attenuation (avg): 75%
Flocculation: High
Optimum Temp: 54 - 77 F
Fermentation Temp: 68 F
Pitch Rate: 0.35 (M cells / ml / deg P)

PRIMING:
CO2 Level: 2.25 Volumes

TARGET WATER PROFILE:
R.O.


This recipe has been published online at:

Generated by Brewer's Friend - Brewer's Friend | Homebrew Beer Recipes, Calculators & Forum
Date: 2021-04-22 19:02 UTC
Recipe Last Updated: 2021-04-22 19:02 UTC
Magnum for 55 minutes will give you bitterness and not too much else, flavor wise. Also, Magnum is known for being a clean bittering hop, not a good flavor hop.

For Cascade flavor, I'd add an ounce or two of it at 15, a couple oz whirlpool, and a couple-few oz dry hop. Then make up any IBUs needed to the desired amount in the recipe with a 60 minute Magnum (or Cascade) addition.
 

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Agreed w/ the above. I like using what you have, but 1.8 of Magnum for 60 minutes is going to be all bitter, no flavor. Set that around half, and then add the Cascade late-ish (-20 min, -10, flameout, whirlpool, dry.... take your pick).

Off the top, an ounce of Magnum at boil and then 4 - 6 oz. Cascade distributed across 2 or maybe 3 of the later spots mentioned. 2 at -10 min, 2 whirpooled at 190F, 1 dry after a few days fermenting?

Definitely don't brew our recipes, but yeah, do reconsider that full load of Magnum for that long. Or use the .8 ounces, and the Cascades sometime later, and call it a Pale Ale if you really want to use what you have. It should still be pretty good.
 

marc1

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I have been trying to get my head around the short boil or no-boil method. I started brewing around 1990 and we all boiled our wort for 60 minutes. I understand the time idea, I'm retired and have more time than money so that is not an issue. I have not been able to nail down a hop routine that gets the hop profile beer needs. I read some about 'hop tea' but the opinions are varied and strong. Almost any discussion about 'hop tea' gets way beyond what I care to worry about quickly. Use a Digiboil so it's cheap and easy to boil for 60 minutes and I can clean and do other tasks while waiting for my next hop addition.
Extract doesn't need to be boiled for 60 minutes, so your boil is mostly to get what you want out of the hops.

I'm not really understanding your confusion - no boil would certainly be a big process change so I can see your hesitancy with that, but no one was suggesting that. A 30 minute boil for extract doesn't really change much, you'd just adjust your hop additions to make sure that you get the IBUs desired.

However, if you have things worked out for 60 minute boils and want to keep them, go for it. They won't hurt anything, and it's your beer :)

To your other point, what questions do you have about a hop routine that gets the hop profile that the beer needs?
What are you trying to achieve? What have you tried and what were the results? It could be a recipe issue, or a process issue. This forum is usually pretty good at troubleshooting.
 
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"To your other point, what questions do you have about a hop routine that gets the hop profile that the beer needs?" I change my boil from 55 minutes to 30 minutes my IBUs change from 67 to 52. I would then need to use more hops to achieve the same IBU.
 
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Here are the hops I have on hand:

Cascade
centennial
chinook
crystal
hallertauler magnum
HBC 682
loral brand
mt. hood
nugget
warrior brand
5 hbu hop pellet pack

I don't have enough Cascade (3 OZ @ 4.6 AA) to get the bitterness I want. If I could use a neutral bittering hop then I would get the beer I am trying for. The "5 hbu hop pellet pack" came in a kit and I am not sure what it contains or how to use them. I assume the 5 HBU would be a 60 minute boil? I also have 1 OZ of Centennial and Nugget, they are at least one year old but still in a sealed packet. All my hops are in pellet form.
 
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So this is the latest version, I cut the boil down to 30 minutes. My Hallertauer Magnum package is open so I want to use them all. I changed the Cascade to 10, 5, and hop stand. Is there a hop I have on hand that would be more neutral than Hallertauer Magnum? (See post above) I can make another batch next week to use the Hallertauer Magnum.

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: Hallertauer Magnum Cascade IPA

Brew Method: Extract
Style Name: American IPA
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 6 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 7 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.058
Efficiency: 70% (steeping grains only)

Hop Utilization Multiplier: 1

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.068
Final Gravity: 1.017
ABV (standard): 6.64%
IBU (tinseth): 63.17
SRM (morey): 6.74
Mash pH: 0

FERMENTABLES:
9 lb - DME Pale Ale (100%)

HOPS:
1.8 oz - Barth-Haas - Hallertauer Magnum (13.5 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 12.9, Use: Boil for 30 min, IBU: 52.67
1 oz - Cascade, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.6, Use: Boil for 10 min, IBU: 4.92
1 oz - Cascade, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.6, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 2.71
1 oz - Cascade, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.6, Use: Hop Stand for 10 min, IBU: 2.87

YEAST:
Fermentis / Safale - English Ale Yeast S-04
Starter: No
Form: Dry
Attenuation (avg): 75%
Flocculation: High
Optimum Temp: 54 - 77 F
Fermentation Temp: 68 F
Pitch Rate: 0.35 (M cells / ml / deg P)
 
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Definitely don't brew our recipes, but yeah, do reconsider that full load of Magnum for that long. Or use the .8 ounces, and the Cascades sometime later, and call it a Pale Ale if you really want to use what you have. It should still be pretty good.
I am here to learn and appreciate the feedback. I used to brew "seat of the pants" and had good results. I am trying to become a better brewer and use the tools that were not available to me before.
 

marc1

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"To your other point, what questions do you have about a hop routine that gets the hop profile that the beer needs?" I change my boil from 55 minutes to 30 minutes my IBUs change from 67 to 52. I would then need to use more hops to achieve the same IBU.
OK. Yes, you would.

With IPAs nowadays, having to add more hops is usually a plus :), and people add more later in the boil.


So this is the latest version, I cut the boil down to 30 minutes. My Hallertauer Magnum package is open so I want to use them all. I changed the Cascade to 10, 5, and hop stand. Is there a hop I have on hand that would be more neutral than Hallertauer Magnum? (See post above) I can make another batch next week to use the Hallertauer Magnum.

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: Hallertauer Magnum Cascade IPA

Brew Method: Extract
Style Name: American IPA
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 6 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 7 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.058
Efficiency: 70% (steeping grains only)

Hop Utilization Multiplier: 1

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.068
Final Gravity: 1.017
ABV (standard): 6.64%
IBU (tinseth): 63.17
SRM (morey): 6.74
Mash pH: 0

FERMENTABLES:
9 lb - DME Pale Ale (100%)

HOPS:
1.8 oz - Barth-Haas - Hallertauer Magnum (13.5 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 12.9, Use: Boil for 30 min, IBU: 52.67
1 oz - Cascade, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.6, Use: Boil for 10 min, IBU: 4.92
1 oz - Cascade, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.6, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 2.71
1 oz - Cascade, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.6, Use: Hop Stand for 10 min, IBU: 2.87

YEAST:
Fermentis / Safale - English Ale Yeast S-04
Starter: No
Form: Dry
Attenuation (avg): 75%
Flocculation: High
Optimum Temp: 54 - 77 F
Fermentation Temp: 68 F
Pitch Rate: 0.35 (M cells / ml / deg P)
This looks good!

IPAs usually have dry hops nowadays, too. From the list of hops you have, Centennial and/or Chinook would work well as a dry hop with the Cascade you have in the boil. Classic old school C-hop IPA flavors.
 

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I am here to learn and appreciate the feedback. I used to brew "seat of the pants" and had good results. I am trying to become a better brewer and use the tools that were not available to me before.
Love to hear it. I've dabbled for decades on and off and got more serious, well at least declared it a primary not secondary hobby, a couple years ago. I was always seat of the pants recipe making thinking I could do it. I finally quit. I did a couple things that helped a ton: 1) Decide on 8 - 10 "styles" of beer I wanted to focus on (i.e. porter, stout, pale, IPA, NEIPA, nut brown, Wheat, ESB, etc.). 2) Bought a lot of sample grain, 20+ kinds, to take home and munch on to see what they really tasted like (no more internet results "this grain tastes roasted" confusion).

So I brew those recipes time and again and decide what way I would tweak them the next time, making just baby steps. For example I know porters and stouts intermingle, but I'm tweaking the porter to be a lighter body and coffee notes with the stout going creamier and chocolatey. My beers have gotten SO much better as a result.

Anyhow, off topic, sorry. But maybe related?
 
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Love to hear it. I've dabbled for decades on and off and got more serious, well at least declared it a primary not secondary hobby, a couple years ago. I was always seat of the pants recipe making thinking I could do it. I finally quit. I did a couple things that helped a ton: 1) Decide on 8 - 10 "styles" of beer I wanted to focus on (i.e. porter, stout, pale, IPA, NEIPA, nut brown, Wheat, ESB, etc.). 2) Bought a lot of sample grain, 20+ kinds, to take home and munch on to see what they really tasted like (no more internet results "this grain tastes roasted" confusion).

So I brew those recipes time and again and decide what way I would tweak them the next time, making just baby steps. For example I know porters and stouts intermingle, but I'm tweaking the porter to be a lighter body and coffee notes with the stout going creamier and chocolatey. My beers have gotten SO much better as a result.

Anyhow, off topic, sorry. But maybe related?
If these are the beers you have settled on I would love to know what specialty grains you selected. I like the chewy grainy flavor in my ales. I am thinking about trying biscuit malt since I have never used it that I can remember. That would save me lots of work! I am not so interested in wheat beers, except I am contemplating a Hefe Wizen kit right now.
 

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I'm still learning mind you. Flaked barley has been interesting in that way for grainy, in a stout but haven't tried it in an IPA. Victory is more like a saltine cracker for me (without the salt, just the cracker part). I put it in the stout and ESB but also not the IPA, not anymore. Munich is malty for sure, too much and you have an Oktoberfest but a little does help. Still experimenting with 2-row vs. Pale vs Maris Otter as a base. Getting OK with Pales for my hops additions but still wandering about for my base recipe. Want to try a little wheat next time, not much but a little.

Wish I could give a better answer. If you have a local shop, bring a box of ziplocs and get 4 oz of like everything you've ever heard of (within reason). Smell them and chew them and take notes. Next time you look at a recipe, try them and decide if you'd like it or not. Also really helped picking out caramel / crystal malts, 20L vs 40 vs 60 vs 120 etc.
 
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I live at the end of the supply chain except for stuff that comes from Mexico. Our LBS shut down in Dec. He said he was doing fine as a business but had family stuff up north to attend to. San Antonio is 3 hours Corpus Christie is 2 hours but I don't know if they have an LBS. I know they have some mediocre brewpubs! Flaked barley, I have never used that. Remember the Sierra Nevada Robust Porter? It was the one with a brown label. That was right in my wheelhouse. And Smutty Nose Old Brown Dog. Yum.
 
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OK. Yes, you would.

With IPAs nowadays, having to add more hops is usually a plus :), and people add more later in the boil.




This looks good!

IPAs usually have dry hops nowadays, too. From the list of hops you have, Centennial and/or Chinook would work well as a dry hop with the Cascade you have in the boil. Classic old school C-hop IPA flavors.
Yeah, my wife LOVES the citrus fruit flavor in NEIPA. I am practicing for one of those. I need to get more batches under my belt before I spend a bunch of money on ingredients.
I guess this will be more or less a northwest IPA?
 

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Yeah, my wife LOVES the citrus fruit flavor in NEIPA. I am practicing for one of those. I need to get more batches under my belt before I spend a bunch of money on ingredients.
I guess this will be more or less a northwest IPA?
Yup. Old school west coast style.

There's a giant thread on here about making NEIPA. It's very process sensitive, good cold side O2 mitigation can help them from becoming a brown oxidized mess.
 
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Yup. Old school west coast style.

There's a giant thread on here about making NEIPA. It's very process sensitive, good cold side O2 mitigation can help them from becoming a brown oxidized mess.
I have seen that thread but holy snickers how can an old fart like me glean necessary info out of there? Process sensitive does not sound like my style. I tend to be a little loosey-goosey. Maybe I'll just buy those with the money I save on my beer drinking. ;)
 

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Seems to be a shop in Corpus Christi? Per Google anyhow.

Yeah you must be way down there. I see Donna. Well if you ever make it to Austin, there's a big one there.

You might also be able to chat w/ a place and see if they'll mail you a special order of sorts. Work out a deal to buy 1lb of each grain, but only ship a few ounces, and not mill it, in an effort to help make it worth their while. You'd have to start calling around to see if there are any takers. Before you know it you'd be out $50 for a sampler pack but it might still actually be worth it.
 
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I guesstimate the border is less than 2 miles south as the crow flies.
I'm headed to KC to see the grandkids. I'll schedule an LBS stop or two on the way.
 

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@Sundy Centennial is often referred to "Super Cascade". You could use Centennial with, or in place of, Cascade extracting the flavors associated with Cascade, but with the added bonus of greater bittering contribution.
 

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What are some commercial west coast IPA’s you like?

I ask because your recipes seem to be a long way from what’s on the store shelves. Nothing wrong with them if they’re what you like but if you’re expecting something to mimic a commercial west coast IPA, you may need more tweaking.

Shift most of your hops to the end of the boil utilizing flameout, whirlpool and dry hopping. Focus on the cascade, centennial, chinook and nugget
 
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@Sundy Centennial is often referred to "Super Cascade". You could use Centennial with, or in place of, Cascade extracting the flavors associated with Cascade, but with the added bonus of greater bittering contribution.
I will try Centennial in the boil and move some of the Cascade to dry hop. Thanks for the suggestion
 
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Sundy

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What are some commercial west coast IPA’s you like?

I ask because your recipes seem to be a long way from what’s on the store shelves. Nothing wrong with them if they’re what you like but if you’re expecting something to mimic a commercial west coast IPA, you may need more tweaking.

Shift most of your hops to the end of the boil utilizing flameout, whirlpool and dry hopping. Focus on the cascade, centennial, chinook and nugget
I really don't have a commercial IPA in mind. I am working on my process and trying to get good beer to drink. I am an extract brewer so no whirlpool.
 

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The book Brewing Classic Styles may be helpful in determining which character malts (steeping grains) to focus on initially. It has recipes for 80 different styles. Pick the styles you are interested in, find the common ingredients, and start brewing / researching.

With regard to crystal/caramel malts, most people find that different brands will have a different flavor for the some *L (for example crystal 60L). Consider starting with a set of crystal malts from the same brand, then try other brands after you get a good understanding of the initial set of malts.

Malt Sensory Methods - Brewing With Briess may be of interest.

Don't be afraid of "partial mash". It's essentially a small BIAB - and "water chemistry" and mash temperature are well solved problems for a 1 or 2.5 gal mash.
 

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I read above that you are also wanting to know about short boils and no boil. Short boils were explained well and mentioned to adjust your hopping amounts to achieve your desired bitterness. I have found NEIPAs fair well from the no boil process because the proteins are not heated and fall out as Trub adding to mouth feel. There is usually no buttering hops and almost all hopping is done in a hop stand and dry hop. My last recipe was a no boil, no chill neipa. It was all grain but it is the same as using extract. With dme I like to mix it in when the water is below 100F as it doesn’t clump together as much. Then Heat to 170F. Add a sanitized hop bag and steep(hop stand) for 30 minutes. You can now chill or transfer 170F wort into a stainless fermenter. Stir to get O2 into the wort but to also stir up the hot wort to touch all parts of the vessel. Let sit over night and pitch yeast at desired temp. If you chill, you will not have a extra bitterness from the extend hot time. I have found that a 1.070 wort with 6oz of high alpha hops lends a nice balance to the end beer with no need to dry hop. Last beer was 2oz citra, 2oz azacca, 1oz bru-1 and 1oz Sabro.
 
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Sundy

Sundy

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The book Brewing Classic Styles may be helpful in determining which character malts (steeping grains) to focus on initially. It has recipes for 80 different styles. Pick the styles you are interested in, find the common ingredients, and start brewing / researching.

With regard to crystal/caramel malts, most people find that different brands will have a different flavor for the some *L (for example crystal 60L). Consider starting with a set of crystal malts from the same brand, then try other brands after you get a good understanding of the initial set of malts.

Malt Sensory Methods - Brewing With Briess may be of interest.

Don't be afraid of "partial mash". It's essentially a small BIAB - and "water chemistry" and mash temperature are well solved problems for a 1 or 2.5 gal mash.
I was doing this exact thing. I like to use other folks' knowledge if I can. My book is a beer clone book, I don't recall the title right now. I have been using the resources on the Breiss website and I use their extract in 50 LBS bags.
 
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I read above that you are also wanting to know about short boils and no boil. Short boils were explained well and mentioned to adjust your hopping amounts to achieve your desired bitterness. I have found NEIPAs fair well from the no boil process because the proteins are not heated and fall out as Trub adding to mouth feel. There is usually no buttering hops and almost all hopping is done in a hop stand and dry hop. My last recipe was a no boil, no chill neipa. It was all grain but it is the same as using extract. With dme I like to mix it in when the water is below 100F as it doesn’t clump together as much. Then Heat to 170F. Add a sanitized hop bag and steep(hop stand) for 30 minutes. You can now chill or transfer 170F wort into a stainless fermenter. Stir to get O2 into the wort but to also stir up the hot wort to touch all parts of the vessel. Let sit over night and pitch yeast at desired temp. If you chill, you will not have a extra bitterness from the extend hot time. I have found that a 1.070 wort with 6oz of high alpha hops lends a nice balance to the end beer with no need to dry hop. Last beer was 2oz citra, 2oz azacca, 1oz bru-1 and 1oz Sabro.
I am saving this for my NEIPA brewing guide.:)
 
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So I brewed this on 4/29 using this recipe. O.G. was 1.072, I just checked the gravity and it is at 1.012. It tasted good (can't throw a sample away!) I will leave it for another week and then keg it.

HOME BREW RECIPE:
Title: Centennial IPA

Brew Method: Extract
Style Name: American IPA
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 6 gallons (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 7 gallons
Boil Gravity: 1.058
Efficiency: 70% (steeping grains only)

Hop Utilization Multiplier: 1

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.068
Final Gravity: 1.017
ABV (standard): 6.64%
IBU (tinseth): 44.59
SRM (morey): 6.74
Mash pH: 0

FERMENTABLES:
9 lb - DME Pale Ale (100%)

HOPS:
1 oz - Centennial, Type: Pellet, AA: 7.4, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 21.84
1 oz - Cascade (7 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 4.6, Use: Boil for 10 min, IBU: 4.92
1 oz - Cascade (7 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 4.6, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 2.71
1 oz - Cascade (7 AA), Type: Pellet, AA: 4.6, Use: Hop Stand for 10 min, IBU: 2.87
0.4 oz - Hallertauer Magnum, Type: Pellet, AA: 13.5, Use: Boil for 30 min, IBU: 12.25

YEAST:
Fermentis / Safale - English Ale Yeast S-04
Starter: No
Form: Dry
Attenuation (avg): 75%
Flocculation: High
Optimum Temp: 54 - 77 F
Fermentation Temp: 68 F
Pitch Rate: 0.35 (M cells / ml / deg P)
 
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