Habaneros and their uses

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flylock_jac

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Didn't plant any this year ,but Habanero's are my favorite peppers.
Great in Chili ,salsa , my own hot sauce , chili mac , venison stew and believe it or not .....I like to sprinkle just a pinch on top of a bowl of vanilla icecream.
Try it before you flame me , it's actually very good.
 
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Matt Up North

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mine look like that, but they are green and not quite as wrinkly - I'm sure they are Habaneros though, because that was one of the few plants that I managed to keep straight with the label..

so really you guys think only 1/4 of a Habanero will make spicy salsa or guacamole ? i looked online for some recipes and more of them recommend like 2-5 Habaneros

I guess I will start with 1/4 and up it from there

Go to the grocery store and buy one habanero and cut the tip off and take a taste. It is hotter than **** and you will know what I mean. I had the pleasure of doing a pepper tasting with like 10 peppers all minced up. I started at bell, then ancho, then annaheim, jalapeno, thai, serrano, yellow habanero and then scotch bonnet. Then we ate two spoonfuls of the habaneros just to show how manly we were. Everyone in the tasting crapped the most vile stuff like 15 minutes later and there was much milk consumption. Grab a pint when you do your tasting in order to find out the heat in the hab.

I put one pepper into my stir fry, but halved. The more you chop it up the hotter the whole dish/salsa will become. chop it larger for more intense bites, but less all around heat.
 

jgln

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mine look like that, but they are green and not quite as wrinkly - I'm sure they are Habaneros though, because that was one of the few plants that I managed to keep straight with the label..

so really you guys think only 1/4 of a Habanero will make spicy salsa or guacamole ? i looked online for some recipes and more of them recommend like 2-5 Habaneros

I guess I will start with 1/4 and up it from there

I guess that depends on the volume and how hot you like things. I could chop up a habanero (med size) and eat it with 2-4 tacos depending on my mood and how much I want to feel it, but I usually do that on an evening when I don't have to work the next day, just in case, well you know. ;)
 
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Matt Up North

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These are the culprits that started this thread.

photo-779805.jpg


One is good, two you feel it the next morning, three you feel it in like four hours, and four you will see the bathroom within an hour. There is either 1/4 or 1/2 of a hab in each olive.
 

MriswitH

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Habs are hands down the hottest shiot i've ever had in my life. I loooove me hot stuff, but that stuff is downright scary to me.

I grabbed what I thought was our normal hotsauce of the fridge one day, just hosed my burritos and was about halfway through when I could feel my ears filling up with liquid. Grabbed the bottle: red and yellow habanero Dave's insanity sauce.

OUCH!
 
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Matt Up North

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I have had that ears filling with liquid thing happen to me three times. What the hell is that anyways? Nasal fluids or something?
 

fineexampl

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How can you tell if the Habaneros are ready to pick ? Mine are still green but they are nearly 2 inches long.

Also are they really hot ? I want to make some salsa a guacamole weekend after next for the 4th. How many is a good number to use ?

I'm thinking 1 pepper for salsa, and 1 pepper for guacamole. Thats not too much is it ?
You really want to start small and build up to find your tolerance. If not, you may be in for a surprise.

These are the culprits that started this thread.

photo-779805.jpg


One is good, two you feel it the next morning, three you feel it in like four hours, and four you will see the bathroom within an hour. There is either 1/4 or 1/2 of a hab in each olive.
Looks like a candy jar to me. :rockin:

Habs are hands down the hottest shiot i've ever had in my life. I loooove me hot stuff, but that stuff is downright scary to me.

I grabbed what I thought was our normal hotsauce of the fridge one day, just hosed my burritos and was about halfway through when I could feel my ears filling up with liquid. Grabbed the bottle: red and yellow habanero Dave's insanity sauce.

OUCH!
They are indeed hot and sneaky too.

You've had Dave's, look for CaJohn's products. They're much much tastier and usually all natural.

These are in the habanero family. These were grown on the deck of my patio. This is the Guiness World Record holder for the world's hottest pepper...the bhut jolokia. I don't recommend eating one whole unless you've practiced a while.
IMG_0504.jpg

IMG_0506.jpg
 

imaguitargod

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Habs are hands down the hottest shiot i've ever had in my life. I loooove me hot stuff, but that stuff is downright scary to me.

I grabbed what I thought was our normal hotsauce of the fridge one day, just hosed my burritos and was about halfway through when I could feel my ears filling up with liquid. Grabbed the bottle: red and yellow habanero Dave's insanity sauce.

OUCH!

If you think Habs are hot, try the Bhut Jolokia. Habs are generally around 100,000-544,000 SHU, the Jolokia ranks in at 1,001,304 SHU!!!! I've had them fresh off the plant before and they lit me up REALLY good, nice, searing heat.

Dave's sauces are whimpy too, much hotter and better tasting sauces out there. ;)
 

fineexampl

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If you think Habs are hot, try the Bhut Jolokia. Habs are generally around 100,000-544,000 SHU, the Jolokia ranks in at 1,001,304 SHU!!!! I've had them fresh off the plant before and they lit me up REALLY good, nice, searing heat.

Dave's sauces are whimpy too, much hotter and better tasting sauces out there. ;)
I knew you'd find this thread eventually. :D
 

pnj

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The original Daves Insanity sauce is like Pure Grain Alchohol. You know, the 195% stuff that's basicly fire water. They've started making weaker and weaker sauces then they used to...
 

jgln

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You really want to start small and build up to find your tolerance. If not, you may be in for a surprise.

Looks like a candy jar to me. :rockin:

They are indeed hot and sneaky too.

You've had Dave's, look for CaJohn's products. They're much much tastier and usually all natural.

These are in the habanero family. These were grown on the deck of my patio. This is the Guiness World Record holder for the world's hottest pepper...the bhut jolokia. I don't recommend eating one whole unless you've practiced a while.
IMG_0504.jpg

IMG_0506.jpg

Those look just like the Aji Red I grow but I am sure they are not the same as the Aji Red are not even as hot as a habanero. They are VERY tasty though!
 

kjung

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Are they too hot to just pick one and eat it ? I've never had a Habanero that I can remember.

I planted I think 10 different varieties of peppers, but unfortunately I forgot to label most of them until I had them mixed up and lost track of which was which.

I picked one little thin green pepper and tasted it, not sure what kind it was but man it really had some heat to it. It wasn't a Habanero I'm sure though.

The label on my Habanero's said "Worlds Hottest" on it, even though I know its not really the worlds hottest I'm still cautious about using it.

I want it to be nice and spicy so that paired with some salty chips it will facilitate much beer consumption, but I don't want it to be so hot that people won't have more.


The ones that I've seen labeled as "World's Hottest" (I have two planted this year) are Red Savina, and yes, they are VERY hot.

Any one using Habs for the first time should also keep in mind that the oils will stay on your fingers for a LONG time after you cut & dice the peppers. I would suggest using a fork to hold the pepper still while you're prepping.
I made that mistake once, when I was still married. The now-ex and I were...getting friendly...the night after I made my Jerk Sauce (and washing my hands AT LEAST three times since, including taking a shower), and as soon as my fingers reached her nether reagions, she screamed. And NOT in the way that a man wants to hear his woman scream while you're both naked ! :eek:
 

kjung

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If you think Habs are hot, try the Bhut Jolokia. Habs are generally around 100,000-544,000 SHU, the Jolokia ranks in at 1,001,304 SHU!!!! I've had them fresh off the plant before and they lit me up REALLY good, nice, searing heat.

Dave's sauces are whimpy too, much hotter and better tasting sauces out there. ;)


I can't find any of those around here. I've looked for plants and fresh peppers, with no luck.
 

pnj

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what are those little red chilis that are in Kung Pao Chicken ?

Thai Chilli peppers. They probably have more then one name though. I grew some one year (peppers don't do well in seattle) and they are damm hot. But much less so then Habs and the othere.

Has anyone had those little tiny peppers? rat turds...? Not sure of the real name, I've never seen them..
 

Bopper

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Yes...they are too hot to just pick one and eat it. You may end up in the emergency room, should you choose to do so! The last time I was cleaning some, my girlfriend asked for a taste. I gave her the tiniest little sliver of pepper, so small I could barely pick it up with the edge of my knife. She screamed like a banshee, and spent the rest of the day cursing me.

They are small and fat...typically 1 - 1.5 inches long, looking very much like a miniature bell pepper.

caribbean_habanero_pepper.jpg

I concur - they are, for the vast majority of people, MUCH too hot to just pick and eat. I remember back when I was a freshman on the high school football team, one of the team captains dared me to eat a whole habanero (I will not use the term hazing because I did it willingly and felt no pressure to do so). Well, I ate it and my it was fracken INTENSE - definitely not something I'd do again. This is coming from someone who likes very spicy food. For someone who is not accoustomed to spicy food, it could land you in the hospital, as previously mentioned.
 

pnj

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Maybe you mean Piquin. Little red chiles, very spicy, not much other flavor?

I think those are the ones. I've never seen them, only heard of them or seen them mentioned in sauces...
 
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Matt Up North

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Click for Bigger!
Thai peppers are what goes into stir frys typically. Here is one of the thirty thai pepper plants we have growing here. Just starting to turn the blackish back, so that means they are hot.

I wanted to get some of the Bhut jolokia seeds, but then I thought, "What am I trying to do, win a spice contest?" I am only looking for Habanero heat really. I would be down for some Datil Peppers though if anyone knows where to get some...

Fresno Pepper Plants

Click for Bigger!
 
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Matt Up North

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I just looked at the Cooking and Pairing page and noticed this Habanero threads view count. Click the picture for the full size:

 

Mutilated1

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and then you posted and ruined it

some kind of animal got into my peppers last night and ate all the red, orange, and green bell peppers. Ate every last one of them.

Didn't touch the Habaneros or any of the other hot peppers though.

Must have been a squirrel or something.
 
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Matt Up North

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snails ate half of my habaneros, get some of that corners (english brand, corning, cornells...somthing) snail dust and they will die where they lay. Spent coffee grounds work as well if you are the organic humane killing type.
 

GAbrewer

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Let me tell you a little horror story, children. This one is not for the faint hearted, and you may want to send your little ones from the room while you read this. Let me start by saying that I LOVE the habenero pepper, and that it has a great flavor to go with the heat. I use it to this day when I am making hot wings, and consider it an essential ingredient. But you MUST respect it. In my ignorant youth, I did not, and I paid the price. My first experience with this marvel of nature was to try making my own hot sauce. I bought about a dozen peppers or so, and proceded to slice them up and put then in a bottle with some vinegar. Not a bad idea, and the results were quite decent. Unfortunately, when I was slicing them I was not wearing any protection of any kind. If you take nothing else from this story, friends, for the love of holy GOD remember this: ALWAYS WEAR GLOVES WHEN WORKING WITH HABANEROS!!! I did not, and you can bet your ass that I never made that mistake again. If you do, then you cannot imagine the pain that awaits you.

It started with my eyes. Keep in mind, I am not a complete fool and never have been, so I washed my hands immediately after chopping them. Nevertheless later on I noticed a stinging in my eyes when rubbing them with my hands. After experiencing this I naturally tried washing my hands again, but it was too late and to no avail. The damage had been done. I should have taken heed of this experience and from the warning in my hands. They felt warm, and would feel this way for several days. I found out later that there is an arthritis ointment named Capzacin that uses the active ingredient in peppers, called capsaicin. This experience taught me why it is so effective. My hands felt a very distinct warmth for several days afterwards. It was not unpleasant, and indeed if I had arthritis I have no doubt this would have helped. But alas, a warming sensation isn't the end of this story. Later, when I was taking a shower, one of the worst experiences of my life began. It started with my eyes as before, but oh no, it didn't end there. Let's just say that other areas I washed begain to burn as well. Yes, that's right, THAT area. And if you think burning eyes are bad, that is NOTHING in comparison to having your nether region feel as though it is being roasted over an open fire.

Needless to day, I learned my lesson. Whenever I even THINK of chopping up a habanero pepper, I wear gloves now. Looking back, I think what happened is that the oils from the peppers absorbed into my skin. If you've had any chemistry course work, you'll remember the saying "like disolves like". In short, oil won't dissolve in water. All the washing in the world with soap and water won't help, and in fact makes it worse. I have a theory that perhaps cooking oil or something along that line might help, but it will be a cold day in hell before I try that experiment. Anyway, the moral of this story is simple and bears repeating: WEAR GLOVES WHEN CHOPPING HABANEROS. You can disagree with me now, but if you do I guarantee you will come around to my point of view afterwards. Spare yourself the pain and horror.
 

pnj

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my balls are kinda tingly right now, from the jalapeno I cut up for dinner. I've put contacts in after cutting peppers (SUCKED!), lit more then one lady friend up (hee hee hee) and have had my eyes burn, my hands hurt and everything else as a result of cutting up peppers. I don't wear gloves and probably never will. I'm dumb and stubborn..
 
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Matt Up North

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Extra flavor for the dish, adds that "something" special at his household. I too have had that pleasure of pepper nether after a quick trip to the head after prepping a stir fry. The worst came from an ancho pepper that I thought was not too spicy, I was wrong. SUCKS!
 

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Let me tell you a little horror story, children. This one is not for the faint hearted, and you may want to send your little ones from the room while you read this. Let me start by saying that I LOVE the habenero pepper, and that it has a great flavor to go with the heat. I use it to this day when I am making hot wings, and consider it an essential ingredient. But you MUST respect it. In my ignorant youth, I did not, and I paid the price. My first experience with this marvel of nature was to try making my own hot sauce. I bought about a dozen peppers or so, and proceded to slice them up and put then in a bottle with some vinegar. Not a bad idea, and the results were quite decent. Unfortunately, when I was slicing them I was not wearing any protection of any kind. If you take nothing else from this story, friends, for the love of holy GOD remember this: ALWAYS WEAR GLOVES WHEN WORKING WITH HABANEROS!!! I did not, and you can bet your ass that I never made that mistake again. If you do, then you cannot imagine the pain that awaits you.

It started with my eyes. Keep in mind, I am not a complete fool and never have been, so I washed my hands immediately after chopping them. Nevertheless later on I noticed a stinging in my eyes when rubbing them with my hands. After experiencing this I naturally tried washing my hands again, but it was too late and to no avail. The damage had been done. I should have taken heed of this experience and from the warning in my hands. They felt warm, and would feel this way for several days. I found out later that there is an arthritis ointment named Capzacin that uses the active ingredient in peppers, called capsaicin. This experience taught me why it is so effective. My hands felt a very distinct warmth for several days afterwards. It was not unpleasant, and indeed if I had arthritis I have no doubt this would have helped. But alas, a warming sensation isn't the end of this story. Later, when I was taking a shower, one of the worst experiences of my life began. It started with my eyes as before, but oh no, it didn't end there. Let's just say that other areas I washed begain to burn as well. Yes, that's right, THAT area. And if you think burning eyes are bad, that is NOTHING in comparison to having your nether region feel as though it is being roasted over an open fire.

Needless to day, I learned my lesson. Whenever I even THINK of chopping up a habanero pepper, I wear gloves now. Looking back, I think what happened is that the oils from the peppers absorbed into my skin. If you've had any chemistry course work, you'll remember the saying "like disolves like". In short, oil won't dissolve in water. All the washing in the world with soap and water won't help, and in fact makes it worse. I have a theory that perhaps cooking oil or something along that line might help, but it will be a cold day in hell before I try that experiment. Anyway, the moral of this story is simple and bears repeating: WEAR GLOVES WHEN CHOPPING HABANEROS. You can disagree with me now, but if you do I guarantee you will come around to my point of view afterwards. Spare yourself the pain and horror.

Bah, that's nothing, I've gotten pepper extract on me willy once and also stuck hot peppers up my nose. WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T STICK HOT PEPPERS UP YOUR NOSE!!!
 

mysteryberto

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I bought some Tillamook Habanero cheese the other day. It was awesome but intensely hot. Great on a nacho with some regular cheese mixed in. Also good to nibble on.
 

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Bah, that's nothing, I've gotten pepper extract on me willy once and also stuck hot peppers up my nose. WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T STICK HOT PEPPERS UP YOUR NOSE!!!

LMAO, Yea, I've peed after chopping chiles. But I have so far successfully resisted the temptation to put one up my schnozz.

Pics??
 
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Matt Up North

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I admit that the spice up your nose hurts for a long time but to me the vinegar is so potent, like smelling a dead body. You know it's there and then POW, gets you none the less.
 

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I have been growing habs for a number of years now and have done many things using a healthy dose of poor judgment, putting one up my nose is not one of them, i did however give the wifey a little "rub" after making a batch of salsa, talk about gettin her hot!!! ALWAYS WEAR GLOVES WHEN HANDLING HOT PEPPERS! (and make sure your couch is comfy if you dont)
I mostly dry and store the habs for later use, great in a red sauce served over pasta and clams, I also sprinkle a bit on top of my coffee grounds before brewing my morning joe...mmm hot coffee!
 

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My wife and I had a certain burning sensation one afternoon and it took us a few minutes to remember the jalapenos we had cut up earlier in the day for salsa. It wasn't necessarily a bad thing either...
 

azscoob

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excited about this years habs as they were super hot last year and this is the next generation from those, its also hitting 107-115 degrees here now. I also planted them in huge pots so I can bring them inside for the winter so I dont have to plant all from seed next year. also have already harvested some jalapenos that are way up on the heat scale too, gonna be a good year!
 

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Bah, that's nothing, I've gotten pepper extract on me willy once and also stuck hot peppers up my nose. WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T STICK HOT PEPPERS UP YOUR NOSE!!!

Bah, that's nothing. You know Dave's Ultimate Insanity sauce? When we were bored in Iraq, I got paid about $200 to dip my willy in it.

Totally not worth it.


No, there are no pics.




But yeah... +1 to jerk seasoning. The one I make is about like this:
12 Habeneros, minced (cut out the ribs and seeds to lessen the heat. I leave them in. :D)
1 cup green onion, minced (both green and white parts)
2 tbsp crushed allspice berries (buy whole and crush them yourself... the flavor is miles ahead of allspice powder)
1/2 tsbp ginger root, minced
1/2 tbsp garlic, minced (4-5 cloves)
1tbsp fresh thyme leaves if I have them on hand
1tsp cinnamon
1tsp nutmeg
1 tbsp olive oil

Makes about a pint. Great on chicken thighs/legs/wings, shrimp, lamb, goat, etc scorched on the grill.
 

jgln

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excited about this years habs as they were super hot last year and this is the next generation from those, its also hitting 107-115 degrees here now. I also planted them in huge pots so I can bring them inside for the winter so I dont have to plant all from seed next year. also have already harvested some jalapenos that are way up on the heat scale too, gonna be a good year!

We just don't seem to get enough light here for them to survive the winter indoors, at least in our house anyway, that and bugs attack and suck the juice out of them.
 
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