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Gyle for Priming

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TeleTwanger

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I'm gonna start doing this for every batch. It seems like it would be a lot easier than buying, measuring, boiling, cooling, sugar for priming. Going by Papazain's formula for 5 gallons = to 5 oz corn sugar you just divide 60 by the last 2 numbers of the og to get the qts gyle needed. So for 1.060 OG you need 1 qt gyle(60/60=1), 1.050 would be 1.2 qts(60/50=1.2) 1.070 would be .85 qts(60/70=.85), etc;

All one needs to do is before racking from the kettle to primary rack off 1-1.5 qts into a sterilized container first (preferrably a graduated flask w/accurate vol marks), put a stopper on and put in the fridge until bottling day. You won't lose any beer because it goes back in during bottling.

How accurate do you think this formula is?
 

menschmaschine

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I've done this a few times. The formula I used is Qts Gyle = (12 X Gallons of beer to be primed) / last two digits of OG. It's the same thing as what you have, but might be a little more accurate because your formula assumes a 5 gallon constant. This has worked great for me, BUT... I found the costs to far outweigh the benefits.

You have to scrounge for the extra wort on brew-day and have a sanitized container ready in which to store it. I froze my wort in a sanitized container, but still didn't feel comfortable risking not boiling the wort before adding it to the bottling bucket. I found the corn sugar method to be less of a hassle and not waste precious beer. I haven't noticed any flavor differences, so if they're there, they're so minimal it's negligible. Also, if you make any lagers, lagers primed with spiese/gyle need to be stored at primary temps (~50dF) or they may have a noticable fruitiness from ester production. Lager yeasts don't form noticable esters when carbonating with corn sugar at room temp.

I've tried several different priming methods (corn sugar, gyle, carb tabs) and I ended up right back at corn sugar as the easiest and most efficient method. I guess if I had to brew a Reinheitsgebot beer I'd do it again, but otherwise I'll stick with corn sugar.
 
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TeleTwanger

TeleTwanger

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The only problem I see is getting the gyle out of the vessel without aerating it, the gurgling of typical bottles, so a wide-mouth flask would be best. Also, the fear of leaving the gyle +1 month in the fridge and not worrying about boiling it. Hmm...
 

JMass

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I do this all the time as long as I remember. I keg my beer though. I like the head better - finer bubbles with the gyle. Or is it my imaginations Anyway, it is worth it for me and cuts down on my need for CO2 (and the cost of CO2). I also imagine that it is more like cask conditioned ale when I'm done. I don't even usually do the calculation. I usually just set aside 2 pints or so in 2 Grolsch type bottles and add it back in when I keg.

Not sure what you mean by boiling. The wort is boiled and chilled before refrigerating. To get the gyle out of the vessel, I just dip the bottles in the wort-filled pan and fill them before I put the wort into the the fermenting container.

My carbonation preferences in order are:
1. Gyle
2. CO2
3. Sugar - I think the bubbles are too big.
 
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