Quantcast

Gumbo

HomeBrewTalk.com - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Community.

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

FireBrew63

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2010
Messages
266
Reaction score
5
Location
Lakebay
The freshest seafood you can find with hot and spicy sausage links. We catch our own crab and muscles near my house and cook the same day. The shrimp and scallops we get from a local market. Can't remember the exact spices, will ask SWMBO, but I know there's gumbo file and cumin involved. We also serve ours over jasmine rice.
 

trevor_b

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2011
Messages
177
Reaction score
1
Location
Georgetown
Any seafood gumbo recipes would be great! I've been looking for some good recipes.

Sorry to hijack the thread. Continue. :D
 

Wetfoot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2010
Messages
112
Reaction score
2
Location
Louisville
The roux. I think its the most important thing. You need to be patient and careful, make a really dark, but not burnt, roux. That deep flavor, along with everything else, separates Gumbo from all the other soups and stews.

The other thing to keep in mind is that you don't make a gumbo, you have a gumbo. Its about friends and family - don't get too wrapped up with cultural authenticity.
 

Brek81

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2010
Messages
181
Reaction score
5
Location
Indianola,IA
The roux. I think its the most important thing. You need to be patient and careful, make a really dark, but not burnt, roux. That deep flavor, along with everything else, separates Gumbo from all the other soups and stews.

The other thing to keep in mind is that you don't make a gumbo, you have a gumbo. Its about friends and family - don't get too wrapped up with cultural authenticity.

+1 on both counts

I've found that you can make roux a slightly different way and still get the same effect. I do it by toasting the flour in the oven on a cookie sheet (no oil) about 350f, just stir it every 15-20 min till it gets pretty roasty. fyi It will get a lot darker when you add the oil.
 

rhamilton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2011
Messages
1,242
Reaction score
65
Location
Austin
The roux is key. And slower you cook it, the better it is.

Also slowly boil a whole chicken with a bit of salt and herbs to make your own broth, discard the skin and readd the shredded chicken.

also, don't forget okra : D
 

arturo7

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2007
Messages
10,821
Reaction score
1,028
Location
Huntington Beach
Make your own stock. Use andouille sausage. I use one stick of butter plus one cup of flour for the roux. I stir 'dat roux in a frying pan over medium-low heat fir a least 45 minutes.

Use either filet or okra or both, they add to the thickness. If you use filet, put it in at flame out.

Once the roux happy, I add it to chopped and sweated onion, celery, and garlic. Toss in the stock and stir over high heat for a minute or two. Then add any and all other ingredients (excepting shrimp) and bring to a boil. Once you have a nice rolling boil, crank the heat back to a steady simmer.

After about an hour, I add the filet (I hates okra) and transfer it to a crock pot to let it hang out on low until serving. If you can manage to let it hang for an hour or two, lawdy lawdy, you got some fiine gumbo!
 

rhamilton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2011
Messages
1,242
Reaction score
65
Location
Austin
Also,

I like to add a few tins of smoked oysters you can find near the canned tuna at the store. They also have jumbo oysters that are in a jar but I haven't tried them yet.
 

Pappers_

Moderator
Staff member
Mod
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Jan 31, 2009
Messages
17,862
Reaction score
4,311
Location
Chicago
rhamilton said:
Also,

I like to add a few tins of smoked oysters you can find near the canned tuna at the store. They also have jumbo oysters that are in a jar but I haven't tried them yet.
Smoked oysters in gumbo sounds great! They would go great with the okra!
 

frailn

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2010
Messages
323
Reaction score
15
Location
Overland Park
Make your own stock. Use andouille sausage. I use one stick of butter plus one cup of flour for the roux. I stir 'dat roux in a frying pan over medium-low heat fir a least 45 minutes.

Use either filet or okra or both, they add to the thickness. If you use filet, put it in at flame out.

Once the roux happy, I add it to chopped and sweated onion, celery, and garlic. Toss in the stock and stir over high heat for a minute or two. Then add any and all other ingredients (excepting shrimp) and bring to a boil. Once you have a nice rolling boil, crank the heat back to a steady simmer.

After about an hour, I add the filet (I hates okra) and transfer it to a crock pot to let it hang out on low until serving. If you can manage to let it hang for an hour or two, lawdy lawdy, you got some fiine gumbo!
Are there any spices that go in?
 

rhamilton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2011
Messages
1,242
Reaction score
65
Location
Austin
Are there any spices that go in?
The 'Holy Trinity' of cajun cuisine :D -- onions, green pepper, and celery!

I'll roast a head of garlic and throw it in there too just to be safe. And don't forget the file / bay leaves. I generally use bay leaves and have file on the table for anyone who wants more.
 

rhamilton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2011
Messages
1,242
Reaction score
65
Location
Austin
I'll post my two recipes when I get home. I have my mother's 'traditional' gumbo recipe which is pretty epic but takes most of the day to cook.

I also have a healthier/faster recipe from the SWMBO which isn't as good but only takes an hour or two to cook but it gets better in the fridge/freezer and reheats nicely.

There is also a trick with the okra which is important to prevent it from turning 'slimy' -- if you are in a hurry use whole okra and simmer for the final 30-45 minutes. If you have a few hours to simmer, add cut up okra early and it'll be slimy at first but after a few hours on the heat, it'll break down and add to the texture.
 

mredge73

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 21, 2011
Messages
1,337
Reaction score
231
Location
La Porte
I grew up in south Louisiana, Savoies's pig farm was across the bayou from my house. I have made some of my best Gumbo from their caned Roux. A good starting base is the real secret. Start off with 2 chopped onions (3 Gal batch, 1 onion if less) and a little celery, green peppers, and a small amount of garlic with 2 sticks of butter. Cook them down and then add your water and Roux. (Roux is prepared in another pot if making it from scratch) Add roux and darken to taste. It is seasoned with another product made a few miles away and found in every household in south Louisiana, Tony Chachere. It is just 3 parts salt and 1 part red pepper. For a chicken and sausage gumbo, go ahead and add the chicken (no skins, dark meat only) after the boil starts. Watch out for that hot break, you know what I mean. Boil at least an hour. Sausage can be added in at the last 5 minutes of the boil. Seafood Gumbo is similar except that the seafood only needs to be boiled about 5 min max. Different spices can be used, like filet, to change the taste to a Seafood Gumbo.

Okra is not really a south Louisiana thing, more of a transplant ingredient, but it can be added in at the same time with the onions if you must.
 

arturo7

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2007
Messages
10,821
Reaction score
1,028
Location
Huntington Beach
Sausage in the last 5 minutes? And miss all the flavor it adds? Yowsa

That's the beauty of gumbo, more than one way to skin a cat...
 

mredge73

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 21, 2011
Messages
1,337
Reaction score
231
Location
La Porte
You don't eat it as soon as the boil stops.
The sausage will sit there long enough to impart flavor and fat to the Gumbo without plumping up and floating to the top if you add it toward the end.
Let the Gumbo cool a little before eating it, it is even better the next day.
It usually sits on my warmer (not boiling) for 1/2 hour or more before the first bowl is served.
Good Luck, Gumbo is similar to making wort and I have never made it exactly the same way twice. Make your adjustments based on taste and you will be just fine.
 

ishkochito

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2009
Messages
93
Reaction score
3
Actually the word "gumbo" means okra in a language in west Africa, where the origins of the dish can be traced to. I grew up in western LA and have always preferred gumbo with okra, although I know a few people in the northern part of the state that just put celery, chicken and sausage, and roux and such for a thin soup.

IMO, not gumbo without okra, but to each his own.
 

ishkochito

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2009
Messages
93
Reaction score
3
I didn't read all the responses above, but smoked meats are great in gumbo. Tasso ham is excellent in there, but a couple smoked ducks can't be beat. I happen to have a small pot of smoked chicken gumbo cooking when I stumbled on this thread.

As someone mentioned, or probably several have, the roux is key. You can get a dark roux by just cooking the flour in an iron skillet dry and then adding some broth. I usually just use the method I grew up with, which is one part oil (or butter) and one part flour. Either way, have a beer or wine in one hand while stirring constantly with the other until you are afraid you will burn it, then keep stirring for a few more minutes.
 

mojo_wire

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
204
Reaction score
32
Location
Milwaukee
Man, this thread reminds me of back before I had kids and had more than 5 minutes at a time to devote to things like cooking. Suddenly gumbo tomorrow sounds so good, until I remember I have to chase two boys around all day.
 

mredge73

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 21, 2011
Messages
1,337
Reaction score
231
Location
La Porte
The only rule is to not burn it.
Darken to taste, I like it a dark amber color and I use oil.
Make it in a skillet so you can add it in a little at a time to your Gumbo pot until it taste just right.
 

rhamilton

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2011
Messages
1,242
Reaction score
65
Location
Austin
Yea lighter is OK, burnt is not.

If you are familiar with roux:

Darker than etouffee roux, slightly lighter than a dark gravy roux

Attached is SWMBO's quick gumbo recipe. It gets better with age and freezes well so it's a good option if you are only cooking for 2 or 3 like I am. You can use canned roux or make your own -- no real difference. The recipe calles for 'healthy' options but feel free to go 'full-flavor' if SWMBO will let you :p

Emily’s Healthy Chicken & Sausage Gumbo Recipe

~ means around/approximately…because I don’t ever really measure.

Ingredients:
1 whole cut up chicken. Try to find one with the heart/liver/gizzards!
1 pkg sausage of your choice (I like Richard’s—either the low sodium pork or the turkey)
~4 onions—chopped
~2-3 bell peppers—chopped (at least 1 green, be creative with the others)
~2-3 stalks celery—chopped
~8-10 cloves of garlic—chopped
~ - ½ container of powdered roux
~1 Tbsp dried thyme—more or less depending on your tastes
~2-3 dried bay leaves
1 bunch green onions (just the green part on top)
--Don’t throw away the green onion bottoms. If you wrap a damp paper towel around the roots or put
them in a cup of water in the fridge, they will grow and you can keep using them for several weeks
Salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper—to taste
~ - ½ bunch fresh parsley OR ~2 Tbsp dried parsley

1) Put chicken pieces into a big pot and cover the chicken with water. Bring to a boil & salt the water (but not til it
boils). Let the chicken boil for about 10-15 minutes (the chicken doesn’t need to be cooked all the way) & pull
the chicken out of the stock and let it cool. Keep the stock on the stove at a simmer. Once the chicken is cool
enough, pick all the meat away from the skin & bones. Don’t add it back to the pot right away.

2) Meanwhile, (while the chicken is boiling) chop your onion, bell pepper, celery, garlic.

3) Mix the powdered roux with a little cold water and stir til its smooth & add it to the hot stock. Make sure to
whisk it really well so there aren’t any lil lumps. Keep it at a simmer.

4) Ok, now you have a choice (I really don’t notice a difference in the taste either way).

a. If you want it to be ready sooner…sauté your onion, bell pepper & celery in a little olive oil until they’re
translucent. Don’t add the chopped garlic until the other veggies are almost done or it will get bitter. Add
cooked veggies to stock/roux mixture.
b. OR…if you aren’t in a hurry… just dump all the raw chopped veggies into the stock/roux mixture and let
them cook til they are soft.

5) Add the thyme & bay leaves. Keep on a’simmerin.

6) You have options with the sausage too. You can just slice it and dump it in or you can slice it, brown it, and then
add it (I personally prefer it browned).

7) Add the chicken meat & let it simmer for a few more minutes. Taste it for seasoning, add what you want.

8) About 10-15 minutes before you are ready to eat, add the green onion and the parsley.

9) Serve over rice.
 

craigd

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2008
Messages
315
Reaction score
2
Location
Central Florida
I keep the roux lighter (peanut butter shade) for seafood and dark (milk chocolate) for game/red meats. I really enjoy smoked ham and andouille sausage in mine but I generally just use whatever leftover meat is around and rarely buy meat specifically for a gumbo. I generally find that meat that was precooked and added in late to the gumbo works better anyway - except for seafood which should be fresh if possible but I'm not above frozen.
 
Top