Guess who got a bread machine... This guy!

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Donasay

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Hey I just got a bread machine and I am loving every minute of it. Do you guys have any tested recipes that you would recommend I try. I am on the search for a few good ones and I have an excellent 11 grain bread recipe that has come out well.

This weekend I am going to try a chocolate bread, but don't entirely know if the recipe off the internet will work well. I tried a cheese bread recipe from the same site and the bread mushroomed out of the pan and down on to the heating element (to much bread or to much of a rise). It was very smokey in my kitchen, but delicious none the less.

But I am still amazed at this thing, it totally rocks!
 

McKBrew

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I don't use ours very often and I should. While a bread machine might make purists cringe, it's a simple and quick way to make awesome bread.
 

bmckee56

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I just started using my Kitchen Aide stand mixer to create pizza dough and am looking forward to making some bread recipes soon. Sorry but I have none to share at the moment. Have you tried checking FoodNetwork.com for recipes?

Good Luck.

Salute! :mug:
 

HenryHill

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I have two and I still make bread the old fashioned way, and it ain't because of being purist.
 

Laurel

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<-----Cringing purist.



Bread machines make fine sandwich breads, but it'll never hold a candle to a kitchenaid, time, and a real oven.
 

ChshreCat

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Ours was a lifesaver. We got hit with a bad snowstorm a few years back and the town was cut off. One of the things the stores were out of was bread. We were able to use the breadmaker to pop out a loaf (man that sounds bad) every couple of days. We even made some for our neighbors.

I agree... it's not as good as totally homemade, but it makes a decent bread.
 
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Donasay

Donasay

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<-----Cringing purist.



Bread machines make fine sandwich breads, but it'll never hold a candle to a kitchenaid, time, and a real oven.

I used the dough function to make a nice round sourdough loaf using the oven. The thing rose in 3 hours instead of the usual overnight. I consider that a win right there!
 

jmulligan

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Homemade bread IS delicious...but since I work, the only way I can come home to the lovely smell of baking bread is with my bread machine. This is one of my absolute favorite recipes, it's from The Bread Machine Cookbook.

 

Laurel

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Homemade bread IS delicious...but since I work, the only way I can come home to the lovely smell of baking bread is with my bread machine. This is one of my absolute favorite recipes, it's from The Bread Machine Cookbook.

This is a great recipe and I used to make it all the time when I was in middle school. Thank you for the recipe!

I usually only make breads on the weekends.
 

Laurel

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I used the dough function to make a nice round sourdough loaf using the oven. The thing rose in 3 hours instead of the usual overnight. I consider that a win right there!

There is only so much that a bread machine's knead cycle can do.

These are the same dough with different kneading techniques

 
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<-----Cringing purist.

Bread machines make fine sandwich breads, but it'll never hold a candle to a kitchenaid, time, and a real oven.
That's funny...a few years ago, my cousin gave me her virtually brand new Kitchenaid. I asked why she didn't want it, and her response was "Because I'm a purist." I guess there are varying degrees of purity.

Whatever...all I know, is I got a great mixer out of the deal! I use that thing all the time. Thanks cuz!
 

dontman

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this thread inspired me to make pasta for dinner. I know, not the same thing, but its still dough.
 

dontman

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if from scratch, what drying time..?
Definitely from scratch. 1.5 hour dough rest, work and cut, then anywhere from 1 to 24 hours drying. Tonight 1 hour.

Homemade Sweet Italian Sausage and fresh chopped tomato and parmesan to top.
 

dontman

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To UN thread hijack, I used to make bread by hand but after I cheffed at a restaurant with a dedicated bread oven the effort didn't seem worth it. The thing I missed was the steam injection. Nothing can duplicate that.

That said from purely a convenience point of view bread machines put out a great product. Used to remind of those Pepperidge Farm bread loaves in their density. Kind of pleasing and certainly better than most anything you purchase from a supermarket.
 

Laurel

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That's funny...a few years ago, my cousin gave me her virtually brand new Kitchenaid. I asked why she didn't want it, and her response was "Because I'm a purist." I guess there are varying degrees of purity.

Whatever...all I know, is I got a great mixer out of the deal! I use that thing all the time. Thanks cuz!

I can understand wanting to knead by hand, but in some cases, it's difficult to get as wet a dough as you'd like if you're not using a mixer to knead for you. I reference Rose Levy Beranbaum's The Bread Bible. ;)
 

Laurel

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Definitely from scratch. 1.5 hour dough rest, work and cut, then anywhere from 1 to 24 hours drying. Tonight 1 hour.

Homemade Sweet Italian Sausage and fresh chopped tomato and parmesan to top.
Is there a reason that you rest the dough for 1.5 hours? I admit to never having used a recipe, but I've made pasta numerous times and have never had problems with less than 5 minutes of resting the dough.
 

dontman

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Is there a reason that you rest the dough for 1.5 hours? I admit to never having used a recipe, but I've made pasta numerous times and have never had problems with less than 5 minutes of resting the dough.
Same reason you need to rest bread dough prior to baking. I've never had dough that was even close to workable without at least an hour rest. The glutens need time to relax. If I tried to work my dough into pasta at 5 minutes it would disintegrate into ripped shreds of nastiness.
 

caver95

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this thread made me buy Rose Levy Beranbaum's The Bread Bible. I have had problems with the bread being dense and dry is that too little water? I like to add all kinds of stuff seeds and grain sorts of things.
 

dontman

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this thread made me buy Rose Levy Beranbaum's The Bread Bible. I have had problems with the bread being dense and dry is that too little water? I like to add all kinds of stuff seeds and grain sorts of things.
It is actually more from less gluten formation. This is caused by bread dough not resting enough before baking.
 

Laurel

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Same reason you need to rest bread dough prior to baking. I've never had dough that was even close to workable without at least an hour rest. The glutens need time to relax. If I tried to work my dough into pasta at 5 minutes it would disintegrate into ripped shreds of nastiness.
You must make a much drier dough than me. My pasta turns out fine and I almost always do a very short rest.

I'm not sure what type of rest you're talking about, but in bread, the rest is generally prior to kneading and shaping, not baking. Most recipes call for about a 20 minute rest at that, not 1+ hours.
 

RayInUT

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I haven't used my breadmaker since I started the no knead bread. I can make it way faster than with the bread machine (excluding the 12-18 hour wait). I just make the dough every night or two before I go to bed and bake it the next day. I work from home though so it's easy.
 
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Donasay

Donasay

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I haven't used my breadmaker since I started the no knead bread. I can make it way faster than with the bread machine (excluding the 12-18 hour wait). I just make the dough every night or two before I go to bed and bake it the next day. I work from home though so it's easy.
When I used to make the no knead bread recipe, I would mix all of the ingredients in a one gallon zip lock bag and let it sit overnight in the bag. It saved on a ton of mess around the kitchen, just dump it out of the bag and into the hot dutchoven.
 
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