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Grist Analysis: Monster Mill 3

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eldplanko

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Just thought I'd share for anyone interested, grist analysis from today with new sieves:

Malt: Skagit Valley Pilot Pilsner; Assortment: 94-4-1; 4.4% moisture
Mill: Monster Mill 3 Roller, 1.5" roller; 1/3 hp @ 175 rpm

Gap (1/1000 in) #14 #30 #60 pan
45 70% 16% 6% 8%
35 61% 23% 8% 8%
30 52% 30% 9% 10%
25 42% 36% 10% 12%
 

danmeljeff

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Hi Eldplanko,

I've got the same mill, and am interested in your analysis. However, I must admit, I'm not exactly sure how to interpret this data. Would you mind stepping me through it a bit?
 

Vale71

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Even the finest grind looks awfully coarse.
 
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eldplanko

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By itself doesn’t mean much, as depends on your lautering system. The percentages represent a particle size distribution, above #14 is coarse, under #60 is fine. Finer grind = quicker conversion, but at the cost of potential stuck or long sparge time. Last mash I did was at 45-thousandths, got 80% conversion by 30 minutes and 96% conversion by 70 minutes, so even with a large percentage above #14 got near full conversion in about an hour. Lauter was 45 min, or about 2L/min with 89% extract into the kettle.

Next time will be 30-thousandths, targeting ~50% above #14, try to get full conversion time down, and still maintain a reasonable sparge.
 

Vale71

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Just watch those hulls at 175 rpm there will be quite a bit of shredding, might require some conditioning.
 
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eldplanko

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Just watch those hulls at 175 rpm there will be quite a bit of shredding, might require some conditioning.
There’s only one way to find out how much you can push the system. I ran this mill forever at 45-thousandths because it was considered “safe” and was surprised how coarse it was... the main reason for sharing this info.
 

danmeljeff

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The percentages represent a particle size distribution, above #14 is coarse, under #60 is fine. Finer grind = quicker conversion, but at the cost of potential stuck or long sparge time.
Ah, I think I see then...
At 45/1000th gap, 70% of milled grain DID NOT pass through the #14 sieve
Of the 30% that DID pass through the #14 sieve, 16% DID NOT pass through the #30 sieve
Of the 14% that DID pass through the #30 sieve, 6% DID NOT pass through the #60 sieve, and 8% DID pass through into the collection pan

Sorry for my naiveite, but trying to make sure I have this data correct.

Also, did you do a fair bit of shaking of the sieves?
 
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eldplanko

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Ah, I think I see then...
At 45/1000th gap, 70% of milled grain DID NOT pass through the #14 sieve
Of the 30% that DID pass through the #14 sieve, 16% DID NOT pass through the #30 sieve
Of the 14% that DID pass through the #30 sieve, 6% DID NOT pass through the #60 sieve, and 8% DID pass through into the collection pan

Sorry for my naiveite, but trying to make sure I have this data correct.

Also, did you do a fair bit of shaking of the sieves?
You got it.... 3 min shake, side to side, tap every 15 seconds.

 

danmeljeff

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Thanks for the link to the craft brewer's conference pdf...very interesting. The thing that stood out is this...

"Results for Mill Setting

ALL of the breweries with a VERY coarse grind had good brewhouse efficiencies (89% and above).
NO breweries with finer grinds had efficiencies in the 89% or higher range."


I would not have guessed that a more course grind would increase brewhouse efficiency. Judging by the report in conjunction with your findings, the 45/1000ths (~1.1mm) gap size appears to be optimal.

Cool data. I appreciate you taking the time to do the work and post the results!
 
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